Aquafaba: what’s the inside story on chickpea water?

Aquafaba: what’s the inside story on chickpea water?

By
Louise Burfitt
October 13, 2020

You say "aqua", I say "faba"

IMeringues, mousse, macaroons – all tempting treats, but ones that were until very recently off-limits for vegans due to the traditional use of eggs in all three. Until 2015, that is, when a French food blogger discovered by chance that whipped chickpea water fluffs up into a light meringue – just like egg whites do.

Since named ‘aquafaba’, this viscous liquid can be used as an emulsifying, foaming, binding and thickening agent in baking recipes and other dishes where eggs are normally used. Last year aquafaba was hailed as a top food trend (alongside jackfruit) and it’s thought that the global market for egg substitutes will climb to $1.152 billion by 2022.

What is aquafaba?

Aquafaba (Latin for ‘bean water’) refers to the drained liquid leftover from cooking dried pulses or from tins or jars of cooked beans, usually chickpeas. Vegan bakers have been driving the increasing popularity of this liquid, previously poured down the drain, as the starchy water can be whipped up and used as a substitute for egg whites or yolks in plant-based meringues, macaroons, mayonnaise and even cocktails.

Trend drivers: Ethical egg substitutes and food waste concerns 

Demand for plant-based products is higher than ever and consumers are increasingly seeking alternatives to eggs for moral reasons. About 90% of all the eggs consumed each year are still laid on battery farms, which makes them something of a no-no for ethically-minded consumers (particularly millennials) as well as devoted vegans. Aquafaba means egg avoiders can continue enjoying traditional egg-based foods like waffles, mousses and pavlovas. The same is true of people who might be steering clear of eggs for other reasons - whether environmental concerns about the egg industry or an allergy.

Reducing food waste is another reason behind the rise of aquafaba, and one that’s increasingly on the minds of consumers. Food waste is responsible for 8% of global emissions, making the use of underutilised byproducts of production more important than ever. Aquafaba is produced in great quantities by companies processing chickpeas, for example to make hummus, and is also regularly poured down the sink by home cooks. By transforming the idea of this liquid in the minds of consumers - from waste product to ingenious egg substitute - companies can help customers to start thinking of chickpea liquid as something to utilise.

Product Applications: Baking substitutes, butter and vegan mayonnaise

As aquafaba mimics the properties of eggs when whipped, it’s no surprise that initial development has focused on substitute products. Oggs has created a world-first egg white liquid replacement that acts just like liquid egg white when whipped or baked (read on to find out more). Meanwhile, Vor’s aquafaba powder and Flourish Baking Company’s meringue powder can be used in place of egg whites in vegan baking recipes.

NYC-based Fora Foods are going a step further, with their plant-based ForA:Butter (formerly known as Fababutter) that cooks, clarifies and tastes exactly like conventional butter thanks to the mild flavour of chickpea water. It’s got the seal of approval from Michelin-starred chefs and tackles the problem of food waste by using leftover aquafaba from hummus makers.

The silky smooth qualities of aquafaba equally make it ideal for whipping up into plant-based mayonnaise. In Australia vegan startup Dibble has partnered with fast food restaurant Mad Mex to create a plant-based chipotle mayo using aquafaba as the base ingredient. In the US, Fabalish are also dabbling in sauces with an aquafaba-based range including ranch dressing, tzatziki and queso dip.

Case studies: Oggs Aquafaba and CheeseItYourself

This year vegan baking brand Oggs launched the world’s first ever patented plant-based liquid egg alternative Oggs Aquafaba. Made from chickpea water, the product whisks and whips just like an egg but is totally vegan. The product launched in UK supermarket Waitrose in 2020 and is soon to be found on the shelves of competitors Asda and Sainsbury’s. A larger 1-litre version is planned for launch for the food service industry in early 2021

Danish company CheeseItYourself aims to inspire customers to rethink the liquid at the bottom of that jar of chickpeas. The young startup has developed a vegan powder mix that can be combined with chickpea liquid to make a plant-based soft cheese. The cashew-based powder is designed to empower consumers to make the most of their food waste – cook the powder with leftover aquafaba for a few minutes, then chill for a few hours. This creates a sliceable cream-like cheese that can be customised according to preference with herbs and spices. In the medium term CheeseItYourself plans to target food service retailers and restaurants with their low-waste messaging. 

The final hurdles: Customers and competition

Although vegans are signed on to the many benefits of aquafaba, less plugged-in consumers may need educating on its uses and advantages. Brands can build this into their messaging, highlighting the potential for food waste reduction and aquafaba’s many versatile uses. Research shows that millennials are the most likely to try experimental products, making this segment a good demographic to target initially.

Companies may also find it an uphill climb to convince consumers that ready-to-use aquafaba products are worth opening their wallets for. Why buy pure aquafaba when you can get it in a tin of chickpeas, essentially as a free extra? Products like Oggs Aquafaba plan to convince consumers with their product’s long shelf life and convenience - something increasingly important to consumers today, while getting the pricing right will also be key.

Egg replacements are bang on trend so it’s no surprise that aquafaba is far from the only egg alternative on the block. However, it is one of the most natural options, free from processed ingredients and soy. Consumers may need a little persuading that the foamy liquid they’ve been pouring down the sink is actually liquid gold, but once convinced, there’ll be no stopping those waffles and whisky sours.

30-second pitch: Aquafaba

🔍 What

  • Aquafaba is the translucent liquid strained from a tin of chickpeas or leftover after cooking dried pulses. Most commonly used as an egg white replacement in vegan bakes, it’s now also being used in vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter. 


🤷 Why 

  • Aquafaba provides an egg-free alternative to egg whites and yolks in traditional baking recipes, perfect for plant-based consumers or those with food allergies. It’s also a way to utilise an ingredient that would otherwise go to waste.


🥚 How

  • In liquid form as an egg white replacement 
  • In vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter
  • As a baking ingredient (e.g. meringue powder)


👀 Who


👍 The good

  • Restaurants that currently make use of hummus or chickpeas on their menus can use leftover aquafaba to create free-from desserts and reduce food waste. 
  • Baking companies and eateries can branch out with aquafaba-based baked goods, like vegan meringues, mousse and macaroons. 
  • Aquafaba can be used to replace eggs as a binding agent in many ways: there’s plenty of room to innovate with vegan burgers, ‘egg’ noodles and further baking product applications.


👎 The bad

  • Competition from other egg replacement products is strong, and aquafaba can’t replace whole eggs directly, for example in quiches and tarts. 
  • Consumers may need educating and convincing, as awareness of aquafaba is low outside of vegan circles.


💡 The bottom line 

  • While using aquafaba might not initially seem as easy as cracking open an egg, it is an excellent substitute for vegans and people with food allergies, and provides a concrete opportunity to tackle food waste. By educating consumers on its benefits and pricing products right, brands utilising aquafab are well-placed to complete with other egg substitute products on the market.

Written by
Louise Burfitt

Louise is an editor and writer based in Oxfordshire. When her nose isn’t buried in a dictionary, you’re most likely to find her taking long weekend walks or nurturing herbs and vegetables in her container garden.

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
  • Get Event Discounts

You say "aqua", I say "faba"

IMeringues, mousse, macaroons – all tempting treats, but ones that were until very recently off-limits for vegans due to the traditional use of eggs in all three. Until 2015, that is, when a French food blogger discovered by chance that whipped chickpea water fluffs up into a light meringue – just like egg whites do.

Since named ‘aquafaba’, this viscous liquid can be used as an emulsifying, foaming, binding and thickening agent in baking recipes and other dishes where eggs are normally used. Last year aquafaba was hailed as a top food trend (alongside jackfruit) and it’s thought that the global market for egg substitutes will climb to $1.152 billion by 2022.

What is aquafaba?

Aquafaba (Latin for ‘bean water’) refers to the drained liquid leftover from cooking dried pulses or from tins or jars of cooked beans, usually chickpeas. Vegan bakers have been driving the increasing popularity of this liquid, previously poured down the drain, as the starchy water can be whipped up and used as a substitute for egg whites or yolks in plant-based meringues, macaroons, mayonnaise and even cocktails.

Trend drivers: Ethical egg substitutes and food waste concerns 

Demand for plant-based products is higher than ever and consumers are increasingly seeking alternatives to eggs for moral reasons. About 90% of all the eggs consumed each year are still laid on battery farms, which makes them something of a no-no for ethically-minded consumers (particularly millennials) as well as devoted vegans. Aquafaba means egg avoiders can continue enjoying traditional egg-based foods like waffles, mousses and pavlovas. The same is true of people who might be steering clear of eggs for other reasons - whether environmental concerns about the egg industry or an allergy.

Reducing food waste is another reason behind the rise of aquafaba, and one that’s increasingly on the minds of consumers. Food waste is responsible for 8% of global emissions, making the use of underutilised byproducts of production more important than ever. Aquafaba is produced in great quantities by companies processing chickpeas, for example to make hummus, and is also regularly poured down the sink by home cooks. By transforming the idea of this liquid in the minds of consumers - from waste product to ingenious egg substitute - companies can help customers to start thinking of chickpea liquid as something to utilise.

Product Applications: Baking substitutes, butter and vegan mayonnaise

As aquafaba mimics the properties of eggs when whipped, it’s no surprise that initial development has focused on substitute products. Oggs has created a world-first egg white liquid replacement that acts just like liquid egg white when whipped or baked (read on to find out more). Meanwhile, Vor’s aquafaba powder and Flourish Baking Company’s meringue powder can be used in place of egg whites in vegan baking recipes.

NYC-based Fora Foods are going a step further, with their plant-based ForA:Butter (formerly known as Fababutter) that cooks, clarifies and tastes exactly like conventional butter thanks to the mild flavour of chickpea water. It’s got the seal of approval from Michelin-starred chefs and tackles the problem of food waste by using leftover aquafaba from hummus makers.

The silky smooth qualities of aquafaba equally make it ideal for whipping up into plant-based mayonnaise. In Australia vegan startup Dibble has partnered with fast food restaurant Mad Mex to create a plant-based chipotle mayo using aquafaba as the base ingredient. In the US, Fabalish are also dabbling in sauces with an aquafaba-based range including ranch dressing, tzatziki and queso dip.

Case studies: Oggs Aquafaba and CheeseItYourself

This year vegan baking brand Oggs launched the world’s first ever patented plant-based liquid egg alternative Oggs Aquafaba. Made from chickpea water, the product whisks and whips just like an egg but is totally vegan. The product launched in UK supermarket Waitrose in 2020 and is soon to be found on the shelves of competitors Asda and Sainsbury’s. A larger 1-litre version is planned for launch for the food service industry in early 2021

Danish company CheeseItYourself aims to inspire customers to rethink the liquid at the bottom of that jar of chickpeas. The young startup has developed a vegan powder mix that can be combined with chickpea liquid to make a plant-based soft cheese. The cashew-based powder is designed to empower consumers to make the most of their food waste – cook the powder with leftover aquafaba for a few minutes, then chill for a few hours. This creates a sliceable cream-like cheese that can be customised according to preference with herbs and spices. In the medium term CheeseItYourself plans to target food service retailers and restaurants with their low-waste messaging. 

The final hurdles: Customers and competition

Although vegans are signed on to the many benefits of aquafaba, less plugged-in consumers may need educating on its uses and advantages. Brands can build this into their messaging, highlighting the potential for food waste reduction and aquafaba’s many versatile uses. Research shows that millennials are the most likely to try experimental products, making this segment a good demographic to target initially.

Companies may also find it an uphill climb to convince consumers that ready-to-use aquafaba products are worth opening their wallets for. Why buy pure aquafaba when you can get it in a tin of chickpeas, essentially as a free extra? Products like Oggs Aquafaba plan to convince consumers with their product’s long shelf life and convenience - something increasingly important to consumers today, while getting the pricing right will also be key.

Egg replacements are bang on trend so it’s no surprise that aquafaba is far from the only egg alternative on the block. However, it is one of the most natural options, free from processed ingredients and soy. Consumers may need a little persuading that the foamy liquid they’ve been pouring down the sink is actually liquid gold, but once convinced, there’ll be no stopping those waffles and whisky sours.

30-second pitch: Aquafaba

🔍 What

  • Aquafaba is the translucent liquid strained from a tin of chickpeas or leftover after cooking dried pulses. Most commonly used as an egg white replacement in vegan bakes, it’s now also being used in vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter. 


🤷 Why 

  • Aquafaba provides an egg-free alternative to egg whites and yolks in traditional baking recipes, perfect for plant-based consumers or those with food allergies. It’s also a way to utilise an ingredient that would otherwise go to waste.


🥚 How

  • In liquid form as an egg white replacement 
  • In vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter
  • As a baking ingredient (e.g. meringue powder)


👀 Who


👍 The good

  • Restaurants that currently make use of hummus or chickpeas on their menus can use leftover aquafaba to create free-from desserts and reduce food waste. 
  • Baking companies and eateries can branch out with aquafaba-based baked goods, like vegan meringues, mousse and macaroons. 
  • Aquafaba can be used to replace eggs as a binding agent in many ways: there’s plenty of room to innovate with vegan burgers, ‘egg’ noodles and further baking product applications.


👎 The bad

  • Competition from other egg replacement products is strong, and aquafaba can’t replace whole eggs directly, for example in quiches and tarts. 
  • Consumers may need educating and convincing, as awareness of aquafaba is low outside of vegan circles.


💡 The bottom line 

  • While using aquafaba might not initially seem as easy as cracking open an egg, it is an excellent substitute for vegans and people with food allergies, and provides a concrete opportunity to tackle food waste. By educating consumers on its benefits and pricing products right, brands utilising aquafab are well-placed to complete with other egg substitute products on the market.

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  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
  • Join a Global Community
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You say "aqua", I say "faba"

IMeringues, mousse, macaroons – all tempting treats, but ones that were until very recently off-limits for vegans due to the traditional use of eggs in all three. Until 2015, that is, when a French food blogger discovered by chance that whipped chickpea water fluffs up into a light meringue – just like egg whites do.

Since named ‘aquafaba’, this viscous liquid can be used as an emulsifying, foaming, binding and thickening agent in baking recipes and other dishes where eggs are normally used. Last year aquafaba was hailed as a top food trend (alongside jackfruit) and it’s thought that the global market for egg substitutes will climb to $1.152 billion by 2022.

What is aquafaba?

Aquafaba (Latin for ‘bean water’) refers to the drained liquid leftover from cooking dried pulses or from tins or jars of cooked beans, usually chickpeas. Vegan bakers have been driving the increasing popularity of this liquid, previously poured down the drain, as the starchy water can be whipped up and used as a substitute for egg whites or yolks in plant-based meringues, macaroons, mayonnaise and even cocktails.

Trend drivers: Ethical egg substitutes and food waste concerns 

Demand for plant-based products is higher than ever and consumers are increasingly seeking alternatives to eggs for moral reasons. About 90% of all the eggs consumed each year are still laid on battery farms, which makes them something of a no-no for ethically-minded consumers (particularly millennials) as well as devoted vegans. Aquafaba means egg avoiders can continue enjoying traditional egg-based foods like waffles, mousses and pavlovas. The same is true of people who might be steering clear of eggs for other reasons - whether environmental concerns about the egg industry or an allergy.

Reducing food waste is another reason behind the rise of aquafaba, and one that’s increasingly on the minds of consumers. Food waste is responsible for 8% of global emissions, making the use of underutilised byproducts of production more important than ever. Aquafaba is produced in great quantities by companies processing chickpeas, for example to make hummus, and is also regularly poured down the sink by home cooks. By transforming the idea of this liquid in the minds of consumers - from waste product to ingenious egg substitute - companies can help customers to start thinking of chickpea liquid as something to utilise.

Product Applications: Baking substitutes, butter and vegan mayonnaise

As aquafaba mimics the properties of eggs when whipped, it’s no surprise that initial development has focused on substitute products. Oggs has created a world-first egg white liquid replacement that acts just like liquid egg white when whipped or baked (read on to find out more). Meanwhile, Vor’s aquafaba powder and Flourish Baking Company’s meringue powder can be used in place of egg whites in vegan baking recipes.

NYC-based Fora Foods are going a step further, with their plant-based ForA:Butter (formerly known as Fababutter) that cooks, clarifies and tastes exactly like conventional butter thanks to the mild flavour of chickpea water. It’s got the seal of approval from Michelin-starred chefs and tackles the problem of food waste by using leftover aquafaba from hummus makers.

The silky smooth qualities of aquafaba equally make it ideal for whipping up into plant-based mayonnaise. In Australia vegan startup Dibble has partnered with fast food restaurant Mad Mex to create a plant-based chipotle mayo using aquafaba as the base ingredient. In the US, Fabalish are also dabbling in sauces with an aquafaba-based range including ranch dressing, tzatziki and queso dip.

Case studies: Oggs Aquafaba and CheeseItYourself

This year vegan baking brand Oggs launched the world’s first ever patented plant-based liquid egg alternative Oggs Aquafaba. Made from chickpea water, the product whisks and whips just like an egg but is totally vegan. The product launched in UK supermarket Waitrose in 2020 and is soon to be found on the shelves of competitors Asda and Sainsbury’s. A larger 1-litre version is planned for launch for the food service industry in early 2021

Danish company CheeseItYourself aims to inspire customers to rethink the liquid at the bottom of that jar of chickpeas. The young startup has developed a vegan powder mix that can be combined with chickpea liquid to make a plant-based soft cheese. The cashew-based powder is designed to empower consumers to make the most of their food waste – cook the powder with leftover aquafaba for a few minutes, then chill for a few hours. This creates a sliceable cream-like cheese that can be customised according to preference with herbs and spices. In the medium term CheeseItYourself plans to target food service retailers and restaurants with their low-waste messaging. 

The final hurdles: Customers and competition

Although vegans are signed on to the many benefits of aquafaba, less plugged-in consumers may need educating on its uses and advantages. Brands can build this into their messaging, highlighting the potential for food waste reduction and aquafaba’s many versatile uses. Research shows that millennials are the most likely to try experimental products, making this segment a good demographic to target initially.

Companies may also find it an uphill climb to convince consumers that ready-to-use aquafaba products are worth opening their wallets for. Why buy pure aquafaba when you can get it in a tin of chickpeas, essentially as a free extra? Products like Oggs Aquafaba plan to convince consumers with their product’s long shelf life and convenience - something increasingly important to consumers today, while getting the pricing right will also be key.

Egg replacements are bang on trend so it’s no surprise that aquafaba is far from the only egg alternative on the block. However, it is one of the most natural options, free from processed ingredients and soy. Consumers may need a little persuading that the foamy liquid they’ve been pouring down the sink is actually liquid gold, but once convinced, there’ll be no stopping those waffles and whisky sours.

30-second pitch: Aquafaba

🔍 What

  • Aquafaba is the translucent liquid strained from a tin of chickpeas or leftover after cooking dried pulses. Most commonly used as an egg white replacement in vegan bakes, it’s now also being used in vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter. 


🤷 Why 

  • Aquafaba provides an egg-free alternative to egg whites and yolks in traditional baking recipes, perfect for plant-based consumers or those with food allergies. It’s also a way to utilise an ingredient that would otherwise go to waste.


🥚 How

  • In liquid form as an egg white replacement 
  • In vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter
  • As a baking ingredient (e.g. meringue powder)


👀 Who


👍 The good

  • Restaurants that currently make use of hummus or chickpeas on their menus can use leftover aquafaba to create free-from desserts and reduce food waste. 
  • Baking companies and eateries can branch out with aquafaba-based baked goods, like vegan meringues, mousse and macaroons. 
  • Aquafaba can be used to replace eggs as a binding agent in many ways: there’s plenty of room to innovate with vegan burgers, ‘egg’ noodles and further baking product applications.


👎 The bad

  • Competition from other egg replacement products is strong, and aquafaba can’t replace whole eggs directly, for example in quiches and tarts. 
  • Consumers may need educating and convincing, as awareness of aquafaba is low outside of vegan circles.


💡 The bottom line 

  • While using aquafaba might not initially seem as easy as cracking open an egg, it is an excellent substitute for vegans and people with food allergies, and provides a concrete opportunity to tackle food waste. By educating consumers on its benefits and pricing products right, brands utilising aquafab are well-placed to complete with other egg substitute products on the market.

You say "aqua", I say "faba"

IMeringues, mousse, macaroons – all tempting treats, but ones that were until very recently off-limits for vegans due to the traditional use of eggs in all three. Until 2015, that is, when a French food blogger discovered by chance that whipped chickpea water fluffs up into a light meringue – just like egg whites do.

Since named ‘aquafaba’, this viscous liquid can be used as an emulsifying, foaming, binding and thickening agent in baking recipes and other dishes where eggs are normally used. Last year aquafaba was hailed as a top food trend (alongside jackfruit) and it’s thought that the global market for egg substitutes will climb to $1.152 billion by 2022.

What is aquafaba?

Aquafaba (Latin for ‘bean water’) refers to the drained liquid leftover from cooking dried pulses or from tins or jars of cooked beans, usually chickpeas. Vegan bakers have been driving the increasing popularity of this liquid, previously poured down the drain, as the starchy water can be whipped up and used as a substitute for egg whites or yolks in plant-based meringues, macaroons, mayonnaise and even cocktails.

Trend drivers: Ethical egg substitutes and food waste concerns 

Demand for plant-based products is higher than ever and consumers are increasingly seeking alternatives to eggs for moral reasons. About 90% of all the eggs consumed each year are still laid on battery farms, which makes them something of a no-no for ethically-minded consumers (particularly millennials) as well as devoted vegans. Aquafaba means egg avoiders can continue enjoying traditional egg-based foods like waffles, mousses and pavlovas. The same is true of people who might be steering clear of eggs for other reasons - whether environmental concerns about the egg industry or an allergy.

Reducing food waste is another reason behind the rise of aquafaba, and one that’s increasingly on the minds of consumers. Food waste is responsible for 8% of global emissions, making the use of underutilised byproducts of production more important than ever. Aquafaba is produced in great quantities by companies processing chickpeas, for example to make hummus, and is also regularly poured down the sink by home cooks. By transforming the idea of this liquid in the minds of consumers - from waste product to ingenious egg substitute - companies can help customers to start thinking of chickpea liquid as something to utilise.

Product Applications: Baking substitutes, butter and vegan mayonnaise

As aquafaba mimics the properties of eggs when whipped, it’s no surprise that initial development has focused on substitute products. Oggs has created a world-first egg white liquid replacement that acts just like liquid egg white when whipped or baked (read on to find out more). Meanwhile, Vor’s aquafaba powder and Flourish Baking Company’s meringue powder can be used in place of egg whites in vegan baking recipes.

NYC-based Fora Foods are going a step further, with their plant-based ForA:Butter (formerly known as Fababutter) that cooks, clarifies and tastes exactly like conventional butter thanks to the mild flavour of chickpea water. It’s got the seal of approval from Michelin-starred chefs and tackles the problem of food waste by using leftover aquafaba from hummus makers.

The silky smooth qualities of aquafaba equally make it ideal for whipping up into plant-based mayonnaise. In Australia vegan startup Dibble has partnered with fast food restaurant Mad Mex to create a plant-based chipotle mayo using aquafaba as the base ingredient. In the US, Fabalish are also dabbling in sauces with an aquafaba-based range including ranch dressing, tzatziki and queso dip.

Case studies: Oggs Aquafaba and CheeseItYourself

This year vegan baking brand Oggs launched the world’s first ever patented plant-based liquid egg alternative Oggs Aquafaba. Made from chickpea water, the product whisks and whips just like an egg but is totally vegan. The product launched in UK supermarket Waitrose in 2020 and is soon to be found on the shelves of competitors Asda and Sainsbury’s. A larger 1-litre version is planned for launch for the food service industry in early 2021

Danish company CheeseItYourself aims to inspire customers to rethink the liquid at the bottom of that jar of chickpeas. The young startup has developed a vegan powder mix that can be combined with chickpea liquid to make a plant-based soft cheese. The cashew-based powder is designed to empower consumers to make the most of their food waste – cook the powder with leftover aquafaba for a few minutes, then chill for a few hours. This creates a sliceable cream-like cheese that can be customised according to preference with herbs and spices. In the medium term CheeseItYourself plans to target food service retailers and restaurants with their low-waste messaging. 

The final hurdles: Customers and competition

Although vegans are signed on to the many benefits of aquafaba, less plugged-in consumers may need educating on its uses and advantages. Brands can build this into their messaging, highlighting the potential for food waste reduction and aquafaba’s many versatile uses. Research shows that millennials are the most likely to try experimental products, making this segment a good demographic to target initially.

Companies may also find it an uphill climb to convince consumers that ready-to-use aquafaba products are worth opening their wallets for. Why buy pure aquafaba when you can get it in a tin of chickpeas, essentially as a free extra? Products like Oggs Aquafaba plan to convince consumers with their product’s long shelf life and convenience - something increasingly important to consumers today, while getting the pricing right will also be key.

Egg replacements are bang on trend so it’s no surprise that aquafaba is far from the only egg alternative on the block. However, it is one of the most natural options, free from processed ingredients and soy. Consumers may need a little persuading that the foamy liquid they’ve been pouring down the sink is actually liquid gold, but once convinced, there’ll be no stopping those waffles and whisky sours.

30-second pitch: Aquafaba

🔍 What

  • Aquafaba is the translucent liquid strained from a tin of chickpeas or leftover after cooking dried pulses. Most commonly used as an egg white replacement in vegan bakes, it’s now also being used in vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter. 


🤷 Why 

  • Aquafaba provides an egg-free alternative to egg whites and yolks in traditional baking recipes, perfect for plant-based consumers or those with food allergies. It’s also a way to utilise an ingredient that would otherwise go to waste.


🥚 How

  • In liquid form as an egg white replacement 
  • In vegan mayonnaise, cheeses and butter
  • As a baking ingredient (e.g. meringue powder)


👀 Who


👍 The good

  • Restaurants that currently make use of hummus or chickpeas on their menus can use leftover aquafaba to create free-from desserts and reduce food waste. 
  • Baking companies and eateries can branch out with aquafaba-based baked goods, like vegan meringues, mousse and macaroons. 
  • Aquafaba can be used to replace eggs as a binding agent in many ways: there’s plenty of room to innovate with vegan burgers, ‘egg’ noodles and further baking product applications.


👎 The bad

  • Competition from other egg replacement products is strong, and aquafaba can’t replace whole eggs directly, for example in quiches and tarts. 
  • Consumers may need educating and convincing, as awareness of aquafaba is low outside of vegan circles.


💡 The bottom line 

  • While using aquafaba might not initially seem as easy as cracking open an egg, it is an excellent substitute for vegans and people with food allergies, and provides a concrete opportunity to tackle food waste. By educating consumers on its benefits and pricing products right, brands utilising aquafab are well-placed to complete with other egg substitute products on the market.