Big Food x Startups: Something for Everyone

Big Food x Startups: Something for Everyone

By
Nicola Spalding
February 2, 2021

Big Food x Startups: Something for Everyone

 

The big news last week was the announcement of PepsiCo and Beyond Meat coming together to create the future of plant-based snacks and drinks. 

 

💡 What it means:

🤷‍♂️Why they did it:

  • Beyond Meat can now take advantage of the powerhouse that PepsiCo is to tap into its massive global sales and distribution network and skyrocket their products into the big leagues.
  • Plus, with the marketing prowess (and budget) of a multinational doing nearly $70 billion in annual revenue, Beyond Meat’s message can be spread far and wide, winning over more mainstream consumers.
  • For PepsiCo, the often slow moving corporate that sometimes misses the mark now gets to play in the ever-growing plant-based arena without the need to start from scratch. Also cha-ching 💰

💸More money moves in big food x startups:

  • US meat giant Tyson Foods invested in cell-based meat techs Memphis Meats and Future Meat Technologies in 2018 and the cultivated shrimp startup, New Wave Foods in 2019.
  • Kellogg’s and Tyson Ventures teamed up to invest in the future of fermented funghi's with MycoTechnology in 2020.
  • Vinh Hoan Corporation, the world’s largest fish producer, partnered with cell-based seafood tech Avant Meats just last week.
  • General Mills took part in alt seafood startup Good Catch's $32M funding round in 2020. 
  • Kraft Heinz got cultured with alt-dairy through its $3.5M investment in New Culture back in 2019.
  • Danone got behind waste food rescuers by participating in a $13.7M round of Hungry Harvest in 2020.
  • Müller the still privately-held German dairy giant cornered the dairy-free market with a $2.5 Million cash injection into plant-based yoghurt startup Yofix Probiotics in 2020.

❤️Why all the startup love?

No, corporates haven't suddenly started a crusade to help out the little guy. Instead, they have a lot to gain by taking part in fast-paced startups:

  • Simplicity: It’s a (relatively) easy way for the big players to pick up new tech and capabilities without the drag and expense involved with years of R&D.
  • Low(er)-risk: Which means traditionally safe big corps can play in emerging markets that are potentially fast-growing but with lower risk than starting from scratch themselves.
  • Image: There’s a rub-off halo effect of being involved in impact tech and startups that says: “We’re not what you think. Look at us saving the planet and staying ahead of the curve!”
  • Culture: An old dog really can learn new tricks. Big firms can revitalise jaded practices and business models with fresh inspiration from dynamic startup. #InnovationOutings anyone? 

👀Dive-deeper:


Go beyond the headlines - explore the true impact of corporates and wether or not all of this is making a difference.

👂 Corporates: we know you're reading. What's your take on this? Are you for or against more collaborations with startups? Don't worry, we'll keep it between us.

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Access premium publications
  • Get listed on our directory
  • Join a Global Community

Big Food x Startups: Something for Everyone

 

The big news last week was the announcement of PepsiCo and Beyond Meat coming together to create the future of plant-based snacks and drinks. 

 

💡 What it means:

🤷‍♂️Why they did it:

  • Beyond Meat can now take advantage of the powerhouse that PepsiCo is to tap into its massive global sales and distribution network and skyrocket their products into the big leagues.
  • Plus, with the marketing prowess (and budget) of a multinational doing nearly $70 billion in annual revenue, Beyond Meat’s message can be spread far and wide, winning over more mainstream consumers.
  • For PepsiCo, the often slow moving corporate that sometimes misses the mark now gets to play in the ever-growing plant-based arena without the need to start from scratch. Also cha-ching 💰

💸More money moves in big food x startups:

  • US meat giant Tyson Foods invested in cell-based meat techs Memphis Meats and Future Meat Technologies in 2018 and the cultivated shrimp startup, New Wave Foods in 2019.
  • Kellogg’s and Tyson Ventures teamed up to invest in the future of fermented funghi's with MycoTechnology in 2020.
  • Vinh Hoan Corporation, the world’s largest fish producer, partnered with cell-based seafood tech Avant Meats just last week.
  • General Mills took part in alt seafood startup Good Catch's $32M funding round in 2020. 
  • Kraft Heinz got cultured with alt-dairy through its $3.5M investment in New Culture back in 2019.
  • Danone got behind waste food rescuers by participating in a $13.7M round of Hungry Harvest in 2020.
  • Müller the still privately-held German dairy giant cornered the dairy-free market with a $2.5 Million cash injection into plant-based yoghurt startup Yofix Probiotics in 2020.

❤️Why all the startup love?

No, corporates haven't suddenly started a crusade to help out the little guy. Instead, they have a lot to gain by taking part in fast-paced startups:

  • Simplicity: It’s a (relatively) easy way for the big players to pick up new tech and capabilities without the drag and expense involved with years of R&D.
  • Low(er)-risk: Which means traditionally safe big corps can play in emerging markets that are potentially fast-growing but with lower risk than starting from scratch themselves.
  • Image: There’s a rub-off halo effect of being involved in impact tech and startups that says: “We’re not what you think. Look at us saving the planet and staying ahead of the curve!”
  • Culture: An old dog really can learn new tricks. Big firms can revitalise jaded practices and business models with fresh inspiration from dynamic startup. #InnovationOutings anyone? 

👀Dive-deeper:


Go beyond the headlines - explore the true impact of corporates and wether or not all of this is making a difference.

👂 Corporates: we know you're reading. What's your take on this? Are you for or against more collaborations with startups? Don't worry, we'll keep it between us.

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Access premium publications
  • Get listed on our directory
  • Join a Global Community

Big Food x Startups: Something for Everyone

 

The big news last week was the announcement of PepsiCo and Beyond Meat coming together to create the future of plant-based snacks and drinks. 

 

💡 What it means:

🤷‍♂️Why they did it:

  • Beyond Meat can now take advantage of the powerhouse that PepsiCo is to tap into its massive global sales and distribution network and skyrocket their products into the big leagues.
  • Plus, with the marketing prowess (and budget) of a multinational doing nearly $70 billion in annual revenue, Beyond Meat’s message can be spread far and wide, winning over more mainstream consumers.
  • For PepsiCo, the often slow moving corporate that sometimes misses the mark now gets to play in the ever-growing plant-based arena without the need to start from scratch. Also cha-ching 💰

💸More money moves in big food x startups:

  • US meat giant Tyson Foods invested in cell-based meat techs Memphis Meats and Future Meat Technologies in 2018 and the cultivated shrimp startup, New Wave Foods in 2019.
  • Kellogg’s and Tyson Ventures teamed up to invest in the future of fermented funghi's with MycoTechnology in 2020.
  • Vinh Hoan Corporation, the world’s largest fish producer, partnered with cell-based seafood tech Avant Meats just last week.
  • General Mills took part in alt seafood startup Good Catch's $32M funding round in 2020. 
  • Kraft Heinz got cultured with alt-dairy through its $3.5M investment in New Culture back in 2019.
  • Danone got behind waste food rescuers by participating in a $13.7M round of Hungry Harvest in 2020.
  • Müller the still privately-held German dairy giant cornered the dairy-free market with a $2.5 Million cash injection into plant-based yoghurt startup Yofix Probiotics in 2020.

❤️Why all the startup love?

No, corporates haven't suddenly started a crusade to help out the little guy. Instead, they have a lot to gain by taking part in fast-paced startups:

  • Simplicity: It’s a (relatively) easy way for the big players to pick up new tech and capabilities without the drag and expense involved with years of R&D.
  • Low(er)-risk: Which means traditionally safe big corps can play in emerging markets that are potentially fast-growing but with lower risk than starting from scratch themselves.
  • Image: There’s a rub-off halo effect of being involved in impact tech and startups that says: “We’re not what you think. Look at us saving the planet and staying ahead of the curve!”
  • Culture: An old dog really can learn new tricks. Big firms can revitalise jaded practices and business models with fresh inspiration from dynamic startup. #InnovationOutings anyone? 

👀Dive-deeper:


Go beyond the headlines - explore the true impact of corporates and wether or not all of this is making a difference.

👂 Corporates: we know you're reading. What's your take on this? Are you for or against more collaborations with startups? Don't worry, we'll keep it between us.

Big Food x Startups: Something for Everyone

 

The big news last week was the announcement of PepsiCo and Beyond Meat coming together to create the future of plant-based snacks and drinks. 

 

💡 What it means:

🤷‍♂️Why they did it:

  • Beyond Meat can now take advantage of the powerhouse that PepsiCo is to tap into its massive global sales and distribution network and skyrocket their products into the big leagues.
  • Plus, with the marketing prowess (and budget) of a multinational doing nearly $70 billion in annual revenue, Beyond Meat’s message can be spread far and wide, winning over more mainstream consumers.
  • For PepsiCo, the often slow moving corporate that sometimes misses the mark now gets to play in the ever-growing plant-based arena without the need to start from scratch. Also cha-ching 💰

💸More money moves in big food x startups:

  • US meat giant Tyson Foods invested in cell-based meat techs Memphis Meats and Future Meat Technologies in 2018 and the cultivated shrimp startup, New Wave Foods in 2019.
  • Kellogg’s and Tyson Ventures teamed up to invest in the future of fermented funghi's with MycoTechnology in 2020.
  • Vinh Hoan Corporation, the world’s largest fish producer, partnered with cell-based seafood tech Avant Meats just last week.
  • General Mills took part in alt seafood startup Good Catch's $32M funding round in 2020. 
  • Kraft Heinz got cultured with alt-dairy through its $3.5M investment in New Culture back in 2019.
  • Danone got behind waste food rescuers by participating in a $13.7M round of Hungry Harvest in 2020.
  • Müller the still privately-held German dairy giant cornered the dairy-free market with a $2.5 Million cash injection into plant-based yoghurt startup Yofix Probiotics in 2020.

❤️Why all the startup love?

No, corporates haven't suddenly started a crusade to help out the little guy. Instead, they have a lot to gain by taking part in fast-paced startups:

  • Simplicity: It’s a (relatively) easy way for the big players to pick up new tech and capabilities without the drag and expense involved with years of R&D.
  • Low(er)-risk: Which means traditionally safe big corps can play in emerging markets that are potentially fast-growing but with lower risk than starting from scratch themselves.
  • Image: There’s a rub-off halo effect of being involved in impact tech and startups that says: “We’re not what you think. Look at us saving the planet and staying ahead of the curve!”
  • Culture: An old dog really can learn new tricks. Big firms can revitalise jaded practices and business models with fresh inspiration from dynamic startup. #InnovationOutings anyone? 

👀Dive-deeper:


Go beyond the headlines - explore the true impact of corporates and wether or not all of this is making a difference.

👂 Corporates: we know you're reading. What's your take on this? Are you for or against more collaborations with startups? Don't worry, we'll keep it between us.