What does COVID-19 mean for food businesses?

What does COVID-19 mean for food businesses?

By
Laura Robinson
March 17, 2020

In just a few weeks, the coronavirus has transformed from something we were following on the news to a worldwide pandemic that’s having a very real impact on our day to day lives.

Our food system is at the heart of the outbreak. From vulnerabilities in complex global supply chains to fears around food availability sparking panic buying and price gouging, food businesses across the world are being forced to quickly evolve and adjust to a new reality.

Of course, no one has a crystal ball that can predict how things will develop. But by taking a look at how fellow food sector actors are responding, we can consider how best to protect ourselves, our businesses and our customers – and build resilience for the future.

COVID-19 and food: what’s the connection?

Food safety concerns are at the centre of the pandemic. The source of COVID-19 is believed to be a “wet market” in Wuhan, China. Wet markets pose an increased threat of animal disease passing from animals to humans, as it’s difficult to maintain good hygiene standards with animals being slaughtered on site.

But based on previous outbreaks of similar diseases, experts from the European Food Safety Authority claim that there is no evidence that food is a source of transmission. The disease is mainly spread from person to person via respiratory droplets that people sneeze, cough or exhale. So the implications for food businesses mainly relate to reduced capacity due to staff sickness throughout the supply chain and hygiene and communication on site or at point of delivery.

Manufacturing: review and reprioritize proactively

In countries most heavily affected by the virus to date, labour shortages, resulting in reduced production and transportation capacity, have been a key challenge for manufacturers. Fresh food production systems, which are typically dependent on day to day labour, have been particularly subject to shortages in supply chains. While non-perishable food brands, like Campbells, have seen a spike in sales and are approaching the epidemic as they would a storm or another natural disaster.  

To mitigate operational risks and reduce instances of staff illness, some companies have reviewed their manufacturing flows to identify opportunities to reduce physical contact by, for example, removing finger touch access or time records. Many are also investing resources in anticipating changes in consumer behaviour and adapting distribution strategies accordingly. Master Kong, for example, a leading Chinese instant noodle and beverage producer, reviewed dynamics on a daily basis and shifted their focus away from offline, large retail channels towards online-to-offline alternatives and smaller stores. Consequently, they were able to supply 60% of reopened stores – three times as many as competitors.

Retail: combating panic buying and adapting to changes in purchasing patterns

As many other brick and mortar shops are forced to close in the countries most heavily affected, food retail businesses remain at the forefront of the response to the pandemic. But despite authorities’ calls to the contrary, one third of consumers already claim to be stockpiling food – with 88% planning on doing so if the situation continues. From dried foods, like pasta or rice, through tinned tomatoes and vegetables to frozen foods, consumers are looking for products with long shelf lives that they can work through while self-isolating. Some retailers have also implemented sales restrictions on certain items to ensure that all consumers have equal access to staples.

As manufacturers observed, consumers are increasingly turning to local shops or online ordering to reduce the risk of infection. ReWe, Ocado, Picnic BV and Le Shop have already noticed a significant increase in demand, with delivery systems quickly reaching capacity. British supermarkets have also drawn up plans to secure a steady supply of staples and are willing to collaborate to continue to provide a delivery service if any of them were forced to close. Click and collect models are also being heralded by retail experts as potential alternatives for those who want to reduce their time in store or send relatives to pick up their supplies.

Food Service: extra vigilance on hard surface hygiene and shift to delivery models

Even though there is no evidence that COVID-19 is transmitted via food, reservations and restaurant footfall is plummeting. Consumers are concerned about items that might be handled by multiple customers or staff members, such as shared serving spoons at buffets or counter services, menus and condiment shakers or even credit card touch screens. To allay fears around direct contagion, some restaurants have also removed tables to create more distance between diners.

Many teams are already adapting their concepts to open up new revenue streams. Canlis, a 70 year old fine-dining restaurant in Seattle, for example, has shifted from a purely eat-in concept to launching three alternatives: a drive thru, a takeaway stand and family dinner delivery – enabling them to increase their sales from fifty covers to serving over one thousand people a day.

Larger food service actors, like McDonalds and Starbucks were also quick to develop contactless delivery services in China. Door Dash, Grub Hub and Über Eats allow customers to add a photo to their order, setting out where the food should be left for pick-up. Meituan, a leading Chinese delivery service, even provides customers with a paper shield for those eating in crowded restaurants or canteens.

Building resilience: diversification and digitalization

This is unlikely to be the last outbreak of infectious disease that will affect our food systems. So it’s critical that businesses have plans in place that enable them to adapt flexibly and remain resilient. Current reports seem to indicate that diversity and digitalization are key.

Just as governments seek to ensure that food production is geographically dispersed to mitigate risks, food businesses will need to develop a better oversight of their supply chains and mitigate the risks of single sourcing. COVID-19 is also likely to further spur the development of e-commerce and encourage businesses currently focused on traditional store-based selling to take the first step towards digitalization and omni-channel models.

But as experts have noted, shocks to systems can sometimes force companies to discover alternative approaches that ultimately improve the way they operate. Food businesses’ ability to process emerging information, listen to customer concerns and adapt to offer them trusted solutions in the most challenging times will heighten loyalty and ultimately help companies weather the storm.

Things to consider

Manufacturing

  • Map out your supply chain to identify and mitigate any potential risks.
  • Review your manufacturing flows to identify ways to reduce physical contact and keep your staff safe.
  • If capacity is tight due to staff absences, focus on staple goods that have a longer shelf life.
  • Observe how consumers are adapting their purchasing behaviour and adjust your distribution strategy accordingly.


Retail

  • Consider implementing sales restrictions on staples to ensure that all customers have access to key items.
  • Make a hand sanitizer dispenser available in store so that customers are able to disinfect their hands before handling products.  
  • If you don’t already offer delivery services, consider if there are services locally that might enable to offer this to your customers.  
  • If delivery isn’t possible, a “click and collect” model might offer a less resource intensive alternative.

Food Service

  • Pay particular attention to wiping down and disinfecting hard surfaces and items that are touched by multiple customers, like menus, utensils and saltshakers.
  • If you don’t have your own delivery service, consider which third party services you could connect into, if needed.
  • Consider making a hand sanitizer dispenser available to reassure customers that safety is an utmost priority.
  • Offer customers the option of purchasing pre-made meals in package form, instead of offering hot or cold buffets.  
  • Temporarily stop allowing customers to use refillable containers, like bowls, cups and water bottles.

Written by
Laura Robinson

From policy geek to digital consultant, Laura has always enjoyed bringing people together through words or tools to drive positive change. She is most proud of finally taking the leap into entrepreneurship by founding Pink Pear Agency - a network of passionate specialists who help food businesses grow innovative projects and share their stories with the world. Laura is currently interested in project development and management, digital tools, content strategy and copywriting.

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  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
  • Get Event Discounts

In just a few weeks, the coronavirus has transformed from something we were following on the news to a worldwide pandemic that’s having a very real impact on our day to day lives.

Our food system is at the heart of the outbreak. From vulnerabilities in complex global supply chains to fears around food availability sparking panic buying and price gouging, food businesses across the world are being forced to quickly evolve and adjust to a new reality.

Of course, no one has a crystal ball that can predict how things will develop. But by taking a look at how fellow food sector actors are responding, we can consider how best to protect ourselves, our businesses and our customers – and build resilience for the future.

COVID-19 and food: what’s the connection?

Food safety concerns are at the centre of the pandemic. The source of COVID-19 is believed to be a “wet market” in Wuhan, China. Wet markets pose an increased threat of animal disease passing from animals to humans, as it’s difficult to maintain good hygiene standards with animals being slaughtered on site.

But based on previous outbreaks of similar diseases, experts from the European Food Safety Authority claim that there is no evidence that food is a source of transmission. The disease is mainly spread from person to person via respiratory droplets that people sneeze, cough or exhale. So the implications for food businesses mainly relate to reduced capacity due to staff sickness throughout the supply chain and hygiene and communication on site or at point of delivery.

Manufacturing: review and reprioritize proactively

In countries most heavily affected by the virus to date, labour shortages, resulting in reduced production and transportation capacity, have been a key challenge for manufacturers. Fresh food production systems, which are typically dependent on day to day labour, have been particularly subject to shortages in supply chains. While non-perishable food brands, like Campbells, have seen a spike in sales and are approaching the epidemic as they would a storm or another natural disaster.  

To mitigate operational risks and reduce instances of staff illness, some companies have reviewed their manufacturing flows to identify opportunities to reduce physical contact by, for example, removing finger touch access or time records. Many are also investing resources in anticipating changes in consumer behaviour and adapting distribution strategies accordingly. Master Kong, for example, a leading Chinese instant noodle and beverage producer, reviewed dynamics on a daily basis and shifted their focus away from offline, large retail channels towards online-to-offline alternatives and smaller stores. Consequently, they were able to supply 60% of reopened stores – three times as many as competitors.

Retail: combating panic buying and adapting to changes in purchasing patterns

As many other brick and mortar shops are forced to close in the countries most heavily affected, food retail businesses remain at the forefront of the response to the pandemic. But despite authorities’ calls to the contrary, one third of consumers already claim to be stockpiling food – with 88% planning on doing so if the situation continues. From dried foods, like pasta or rice, through tinned tomatoes and vegetables to frozen foods, consumers are looking for products with long shelf lives that they can work through while self-isolating. Some retailers have also implemented sales restrictions on certain items to ensure that all consumers have equal access to staples.

As manufacturers observed, consumers are increasingly turning to local shops or online ordering to reduce the risk of infection. ReWe, Ocado, Picnic BV and Le Shop have already noticed a significant increase in demand, with delivery systems quickly reaching capacity. British supermarkets have also drawn up plans to secure a steady supply of staples and are willing to collaborate to continue to provide a delivery service if any of them were forced to close. Click and collect models are also being heralded by retail experts as potential alternatives for those who want to reduce their time in store or send relatives to pick up their supplies.

Food Service: extra vigilance on hard surface hygiene and shift to delivery models

Even though there is no evidence that COVID-19 is transmitted via food, reservations and restaurant footfall is plummeting. Consumers are concerned about items that might be handled by multiple customers or staff members, such as shared serving spoons at buffets or counter services, menus and condiment shakers or even credit card touch screens. To allay fears around direct contagion, some restaurants have also removed tables to create more distance between diners.

Many teams are already adapting their concepts to open up new revenue streams. Canlis, a 70 year old fine-dining restaurant in Seattle, for example, has shifted from a purely eat-in concept to launching three alternatives: a drive thru, a takeaway stand and family dinner delivery – enabling them to increase their sales from fifty covers to serving over one thousand people a day.

Larger food service actors, like McDonalds and Starbucks were also quick to develop contactless delivery services in China. Door Dash, Grub Hub and Über Eats allow customers to add a photo to their order, setting out where the food should be left for pick-up. Meituan, a leading Chinese delivery service, even provides customers with a paper shield for those eating in crowded restaurants or canteens.

Building resilience: diversification and digitalization

This is unlikely to be the last outbreak of infectious disease that will affect our food systems. So it’s critical that businesses have plans in place that enable them to adapt flexibly and remain resilient. Current reports seem to indicate that diversity and digitalization are key.

Just as governments seek to ensure that food production is geographically dispersed to mitigate risks, food businesses will need to develop a better oversight of their supply chains and mitigate the risks of single sourcing. COVID-19 is also likely to further spur the development of e-commerce and encourage businesses currently focused on traditional store-based selling to take the first step towards digitalization and omni-channel models.

But as experts have noted, shocks to systems can sometimes force companies to discover alternative approaches that ultimately improve the way they operate. Food businesses’ ability to process emerging information, listen to customer concerns and adapt to offer them trusted solutions in the most challenging times will heighten loyalty and ultimately help companies weather the storm.

Things to consider

Manufacturing

  • Map out your supply chain to identify and mitigate any potential risks.
  • Review your manufacturing flows to identify ways to reduce physical contact and keep your staff safe.
  • If capacity is tight due to staff absences, focus on staple goods that have a longer shelf life.
  • Observe how consumers are adapting their purchasing behaviour and adjust your distribution strategy accordingly.


Retail

  • Consider implementing sales restrictions on staples to ensure that all customers have access to key items.
  • Make a hand sanitizer dispenser available in store so that customers are able to disinfect their hands before handling products.  
  • If you don’t already offer delivery services, consider if there are services locally that might enable to offer this to your customers.  
  • If delivery isn’t possible, a “click and collect” model might offer a less resource intensive alternative.

Food Service

  • Pay particular attention to wiping down and disinfecting hard surfaces and items that are touched by multiple customers, like menus, utensils and saltshakers.
  • If you don’t have your own delivery service, consider which third party services you could connect into, if needed.
  • Consider making a hand sanitizer dispenser available to reassure customers that safety is an utmost priority.
  • Offer customers the option of purchasing pre-made meals in package form, instead of offering hot or cold buffets.  
  • Temporarily stop allowing customers to use refillable containers, like bowls, cups and water bottles.

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  • Access Member Directory
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In just a few weeks, the coronavirus has transformed from something we were following on the news to a worldwide pandemic that’s having a very real impact on our day to day lives.

Our food system is at the heart of the outbreak. From vulnerabilities in complex global supply chains to fears around food availability sparking panic buying and price gouging, food businesses across the world are being forced to quickly evolve and adjust to a new reality.

Of course, no one has a crystal ball that can predict how things will develop. But by taking a look at how fellow food sector actors are responding, we can consider how best to protect ourselves, our businesses and our customers – and build resilience for the future.

COVID-19 and food: what’s the connection?

Food safety concerns are at the centre of the pandemic. The source of COVID-19 is believed to be a “wet market” in Wuhan, China. Wet markets pose an increased threat of animal disease passing from animals to humans, as it’s difficult to maintain good hygiene standards with animals being slaughtered on site.

But based on previous outbreaks of similar diseases, experts from the European Food Safety Authority claim that there is no evidence that food is a source of transmission. The disease is mainly spread from person to person via respiratory droplets that people sneeze, cough or exhale. So the implications for food businesses mainly relate to reduced capacity due to staff sickness throughout the supply chain and hygiene and communication on site or at point of delivery.

Manufacturing: review and reprioritize proactively

In countries most heavily affected by the virus to date, labour shortages, resulting in reduced production and transportation capacity, have been a key challenge for manufacturers. Fresh food production systems, which are typically dependent on day to day labour, have been particularly subject to shortages in supply chains. While non-perishable food brands, like Campbells, have seen a spike in sales and are approaching the epidemic as they would a storm or another natural disaster.  

To mitigate operational risks and reduce instances of staff illness, some companies have reviewed their manufacturing flows to identify opportunities to reduce physical contact by, for example, removing finger touch access or time records. Many are also investing resources in anticipating changes in consumer behaviour and adapting distribution strategies accordingly. Master Kong, for example, a leading Chinese instant noodle and beverage producer, reviewed dynamics on a daily basis and shifted their focus away from offline, large retail channels towards online-to-offline alternatives and smaller stores. Consequently, they were able to supply 60% of reopened stores – three times as many as competitors.

Retail: combating panic buying and adapting to changes in purchasing patterns

As many other brick and mortar shops are forced to close in the countries most heavily affected, food retail businesses remain at the forefront of the response to the pandemic. But despite authorities’ calls to the contrary, one third of consumers already claim to be stockpiling food – with 88% planning on doing so if the situation continues. From dried foods, like pasta or rice, through tinned tomatoes and vegetables to frozen foods, consumers are looking for products with long shelf lives that they can work through while self-isolating. Some retailers have also implemented sales restrictions on certain items to ensure that all consumers have equal access to staples.

As manufacturers observed, consumers are increasingly turning to local shops or online ordering to reduce the risk of infection. ReWe, Ocado, Picnic BV and Le Shop have already noticed a significant increase in demand, with delivery systems quickly reaching capacity. British supermarkets have also drawn up plans to secure a steady supply of staples and are willing to collaborate to continue to provide a delivery service if any of them were forced to close. Click and collect models are also being heralded by retail experts as potential alternatives for those who want to reduce their time in store or send relatives to pick up their supplies.

Food Service: extra vigilance on hard surface hygiene and shift to delivery models

Even though there is no evidence that COVID-19 is transmitted via food, reservations and restaurant footfall is plummeting. Consumers are concerned about items that might be handled by multiple customers or staff members, such as shared serving spoons at buffets or counter services, menus and condiment shakers or even credit card touch screens. To allay fears around direct contagion, some restaurants have also removed tables to create more distance between diners.

Many teams are already adapting their concepts to open up new revenue streams. Canlis, a 70 year old fine-dining restaurant in Seattle, for example, has shifted from a purely eat-in concept to launching three alternatives: a drive thru, a takeaway stand and family dinner delivery – enabling them to increase their sales from fifty covers to serving over one thousand people a day.

Larger food service actors, like McDonalds and Starbucks were also quick to develop contactless delivery services in China. Door Dash, Grub Hub and Über Eats allow customers to add a photo to their order, setting out where the food should be left for pick-up. Meituan, a leading Chinese delivery service, even provides customers with a paper shield for those eating in crowded restaurants or canteens.

Building resilience: diversification and digitalization

This is unlikely to be the last outbreak of infectious disease that will affect our food systems. So it’s critical that businesses have plans in place that enable them to adapt flexibly and remain resilient. Current reports seem to indicate that diversity and digitalization are key.

Just as governments seek to ensure that food production is geographically dispersed to mitigate risks, food businesses will need to develop a better oversight of their supply chains and mitigate the risks of single sourcing. COVID-19 is also likely to further spur the development of e-commerce and encourage businesses currently focused on traditional store-based selling to take the first step towards digitalization and omni-channel models.

But as experts have noted, shocks to systems can sometimes force companies to discover alternative approaches that ultimately improve the way they operate. Food businesses’ ability to process emerging information, listen to customer concerns and adapt to offer them trusted solutions in the most challenging times will heighten loyalty and ultimately help companies weather the storm.

Things to consider

Manufacturing

  • Map out your supply chain to identify and mitigate any potential risks.
  • Review your manufacturing flows to identify ways to reduce physical contact and keep your staff safe.
  • If capacity is tight due to staff absences, focus on staple goods that have a longer shelf life.
  • Observe how consumers are adapting their purchasing behaviour and adjust your distribution strategy accordingly.


Retail

  • Consider implementing sales restrictions on staples to ensure that all customers have access to key items.
  • Make a hand sanitizer dispenser available in store so that customers are able to disinfect their hands before handling products.  
  • If you don’t already offer delivery services, consider if there are services locally that might enable to offer this to your customers.  
  • If delivery isn’t possible, a “click and collect” model might offer a less resource intensive alternative.

Food Service

  • Pay particular attention to wiping down and disinfecting hard surfaces and items that are touched by multiple customers, like menus, utensils and saltshakers.
  • If you don’t have your own delivery service, consider which third party services you could connect into, if needed.
  • Consider making a hand sanitizer dispenser available to reassure customers that safety is an utmost priority.
  • Offer customers the option of purchasing pre-made meals in package form, instead of offering hot or cold buffets.  
  • Temporarily stop allowing customers to use refillable containers, like bowls, cups and water bottles.

In just a few weeks, the coronavirus has transformed from something we were following on the news to a worldwide pandemic that’s having a very real impact on our day to day lives.

Our food system is at the heart of the outbreak. From vulnerabilities in complex global supply chains to fears around food availability sparking panic buying and price gouging, food businesses across the world are being forced to quickly evolve and adjust to a new reality.

Of course, no one has a crystal ball that can predict how things will develop. But by taking a look at how fellow food sector actors are responding, we can consider how best to protect ourselves, our businesses and our customers – and build resilience for the future.

COVID-19 and food: what’s the connection?

Food safety concerns are at the centre of the pandemic. The source of COVID-19 is believed to be a “wet market” in Wuhan, China. Wet markets pose an increased threat of animal disease passing from animals to humans, as it’s difficult to maintain good hygiene standards with animals being slaughtered on site.

But based on previous outbreaks of similar diseases, experts from the European Food Safety Authority claim that there is no evidence that food is a source of transmission. The disease is mainly spread from person to person via respiratory droplets that people sneeze, cough or exhale. So the implications for food businesses mainly relate to reduced capacity due to staff sickness throughout the supply chain and hygiene and communication on site or at point of delivery.

Manufacturing: review and reprioritize proactively

In countries most heavily affected by the virus to date, labour shortages, resulting in reduced production and transportation capacity, have been a key challenge for manufacturers. Fresh food production systems, which are typically dependent on day to day labour, have been particularly subject to shortages in supply chains. While non-perishable food brands, like Campbells, have seen a spike in sales and are approaching the epidemic as they would a storm or another natural disaster.  

To mitigate operational risks and reduce instances of staff illness, some companies have reviewed their manufacturing flows to identify opportunities to reduce physical contact by, for example, removing finger touch access or time records. Many are also investing resources in anticipating changes in consumer behaviour and adapting distribution strategies accordingly. Master Kong, for example, a leading Chinese instant noodle and beverage producer, reviewed dynamics on a daily basis and shifted their focus away from offline, large retail channels towards online-to-offline alternatives and smaller stores. Consequently, they were able to supply 60% of reopened stores – three times as many as competitors.

Retail: combating panic buying and adapting to changes in purchasing patterns

As many other brick and mortar shops are forced to close in the countries most heavily affected, food retail businesses remain at the forefront of the response to the pandemic. But despite authorities’ calls to the contrary, one third of consumers already claim to be stockpiling food – with 88% planning on doing so if the situation continues. From dried foods, like pasta or rice, through tinned tomatoes and vegetables to frozen foods, consumers are looking for products with long shelf lives that they can work through while self-isolating. Some retailers have also implemented sales restrictions on certain items to ensure that all consumers have equal access to staples.

As manufacturers observed, consumers are increasingly turning to local shops or online ordering to reduce the risk of infection. ReWe, Ocado, Picnic BV and Le Shop have already noticed a significant increase in demand, with delivery systems quickly reaching capacity. British supermarkets have also drawn up plans to secure a steady supply of staples and are willing to collaborate to continue to provide a delivery service if any of them were forced to close. Click and collect models are also being heralded by retail experts as potential alternatives for those who want to reduce their time in store or send relatives to pick up their supplies.

Food Service: extra vigilance on hard surface hygiene and shift to delivery models

Even though there is no evidence that COVID-19 is transmitted via food, reservations and restaurant footfall is plummeting. Consumers are concerned about items that might be handled by multiple customers or staff members, such as shared serving spoons at buffets or counter services, menus and condiment shakers or even credit card touch screens. To allay fears around direct contagion, some restaurants have also removed tables to create more distance between diners.

Many teams are already adapting their concepts to open up new revenue streams. Canlis, a 70 year old fine-dining restaurant in Seattle, for example, has shifted from a purely eat-in concept to launching three alternatives: a drive thru, a takeaway stand and family dinner delivery – enabling them to increase their sales from fifty covers to serving over one thousand people a day.

Larger food service actors, like McDonalds and Starbucks were also quick to develop contactless delivery services in China. Door Dash, Grub Hub and Über Eats allow customers to add a photo to their order, setting out where the food should be left for pick-up. Meituan, a leading Chinese delivery service, even provides customers with a paper shield for those eating in crowded restaurants or canteens.

Building resilience: diversification and digitalization

This is unlikely to be the last outbreak of infectious disease that will affect our food systems. So it’s critical that businesses have plans in place that enable them to adapt flexibly and remain resilient. Current reports seem to indicate that diversity and digitalization are key.

Just as governments seek to ensure that food production is geographically dispersed to mitigate risks, food businesses will need to develop a better oversight of their supply chains and mitigate the risks of single sourcing. COVID-19 is also likely to further spur the development of e-commerce and encourage businesses currently focused on traditional store-based selling to take the first step towards digitalization and omni-channel models.

But as experts have noted, shocks to systems can sometimes force companies to discover alternative approaches that ultimately improve the way they operate. Food businesses’ ability to process emerging information, listen to customer concerns and adapt to offer them trusted solutions in the most challenging times will heighten loyalty and ultimately help companies weather the storm.

Things to consider

Manufacturing

  • Map out your supply chain to identify and mitigate any potential risks.
  • Review your manufacturing flows to identify ways to reduce physical contact and keep your staff safe.
  • If capacity is tight due to staff absences, focus on staple goods that have a longer shelf life.
  • Observe how consumers are adapting their purchasing behaviour and adjust your distribution strategy accordingly.


Retail

  • Consider implementing sales restrictions on staples to ensure that all customers have access to key items.
  • Make a hand sanitizer dispenser available in store so that customers are able to disinfect their hands before handling products.  
  • If you don’t already offer delivery services, consider if there are services locally that might enable to offer this to your customers.  
  • If delivery isn’t possible, a “click and collect” model might offer a less resource intensive alternative.

Food Service

  • Pay particular attention to wiping down and disinfecting hard surfaces and items that are touched by multiple customers, like menus, utensils and saltshakers.
  • If you don’t have your own delivery service, consider which third party services you could connect into, if needed.
  • Consider making a hand sanitizer dispenser available to reassure customers that safety is an utmost priority.
  • Offer customers the option of purchasing pre-made meals in package form, instead of offering hot or cold buffets.  
  • Temporarily stop allowing customers to use refillable containers, like bowls, cups and water bottles.

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