E-Grocery's: From the humble basket 🧺 to the growth of a multi-billion dollar global industry

E-Grocery's: From the humble basket 🧺 to the growth of a multi-billion dollar global industry

By
Arman Anatürk
February 5, 2021

Every summer I used to visit my aunt's house in Istanbul. One thing that I always loved helping with was buying the groceries.

We made a list of what we needed for the week and picked up the phone to dial the local Bakkal. 20 minutes later someone would ring the bell (or more often shout from the street). But rather than them coming upstairs, my aunt and I would grab the cash, head to her balcony, put the money in a basket and lower it down to the delivery boy who would then fill it up with the groceries along with the leftover change whilst I'd hurriedly pull it back up excited to see what's inside.

Voila groceries delivered direct to your home.

Today the basket delivery system of Turkey has evolved and Getir, the Turkish eGrocery platform is leading the way, fulfilling over 5 million orders every month, in an average delivery time of just 10-minutes and raising over $170M to expand to the US and Europe.

It’s not just Turkey that’s working on speedy deliveries; there’s eGrocery platforms across the world delivering in record-breaking times; Berlin’s Gorilla (10-minutes), London's Weezy (15-minutes), China's Meituan (17-minutes) & US GoPuff (30-minutes) which collectively have raised over $7b to bring groceries to our doors.

Fuelled by covid shoppers who don't want to risk a trip to the store and who have gotten use to the convenience of at home ordering, the eGrocery space has grown massively in 2020 and investors are pouring cash into this sector.

Just this week we've seen big rounds from US-based online grocer Good Eggs which raised $100M, to Uber purchasing the alcohol delivery service Drizly for a whopping $1.1Bn. But companies can't compete on just delivery time alone, and as this space crowds I'll be interested to see the next evolution to set them apart - will it be product choice, ease of discovery, sustainability?

Here in Switzerland I'm an avid user of the online supermarket Farmy, but sometimes, I miss my childhood excitement of pulling up that basket hanging from my aunts balcony...

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Every summer I used to visit my aunt's house in Istanbul. One thing that I always loved helping with was buying the groceries.

We made a list of what we needed for the week and picked up the phone to dial the local Bakkal. 20 minutes later someone would ring the bell (or more often shout from the street). But rather than them coming upstairs, my aunt and I would grab the cash, head to her balcony, put the money in a basket and lower it down to the delivery boy who would then fill it up with the groceries along with the leftover change whilst I'd hurriedly pull it back up excited to see what's inside.

Voila groceries delivered direct to your home.

Today the basket delivery system of Turkey has evolved and Getir, the Turkish eGrocery platform is leading the way, fulfilling over 5 million orders every month, in an average delivery time of just 10-minutes and raising over $170M to expand to the US and Europe.

It’s not just Turkey that’s working on speedy deliveries; there’s eGrocery platforms across the world delivering in record-breaking times; Berlin’s Gorilla (10-minutes), London's Weezy (15-minutes), China's Meituan (17-minutes) & US GoPuff (30-minutes) which collectively have raised over $7b to bring groceries to our doors.

Fuelled by covid shoppers who don't want to risk a trip to the store and who have gotten use to the convenience of at home ordering, the eGrocery space has grown massively in 2020 and investors are pouring cash into this sector.

Just this week we've seen big rounds from US-based online grocer Good Eggs which raised $100M, to Uber purchasing the alcohol delivery service Drizly for a whopping $1.1Bn. But companies can't compete on just delivery time alone, and as this space crowds I'll be interested to see the next evolution to set them apart - will it be product choice, ease of discovery, sustainability?

Here in Switzerland I'm an avid user of the online supermarket Farmy, but sometimes, I miss my childhood excitement of pulling up that basket hanging from my aunts balcony...

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Access premium publications
  • Get listed on our directory
  • Join a Global Community

Every summer I used to visit my aunt's house in Istanbul. One thing that I always loved helping with was buying the groceries.

We made a list of what we needed for the week and picked up the phone to dial the local Bakkal. 20 minutes later someone would ring the bell (or more often shout from the street). But rather than them coming upstairs, my aunt and I would grab the cash, head to her balcony, put the money in a basket and lower it down to the delivery boy who would then fill it up with the groceries along with the leftover change whilst I'd hurriedly pull it back up excited to see what's inside.

Voila groceries delivered direct to your home.

Today the basket delivery system of Turkey has evolved and Getir, the Turkish eGrocery platform is leading the way, fulfilling over 5 million orders every month, in an average delivery time of just 10-minutes and raising over $170M to expand to the US and Europe.

It’s not just Turkey that’s working on speedy deliveries; there’s eGrocery platforms across the world delivering in record-breaking times; Berlin’s Gorilla (10-minutes), London's Weezy (15-minutes), China's Meituan (17-minutes) & US GoPuff (30-minutes) which collectively have raised over $7b to bring groceries to our doors.

Fuelled by covid shoppers who don't want to risk a trip to the store and who have gotten use to the convenience of at home ordering, the eGrocery space has grown massively in 2020 and investors are pouring cash into this sector.

Just this week we've seen big rounds from US-based online grocer Good Eggs which raised $100M, to Uber purchasing the alcohol delivery service Drizly for a whopping $1.1Bn. But companies can't compete on just delivery time alone, and as this space crowds I'll be interested to see the next evolution to set them apart - will it be product choice, ease of discovery, sustainability?

Here in Switzerland I'm an avid user of the online supermarket Farmy, but sometimes, I miss my childhood excitement of pulling up that basket hanging from my aunts balcony...

Every summer I used to visit my aunt's house in Istanbul. One thing that I always loved helping with was buying the groceries.

We made a list of what we needed for the week and picked up the phone to dial the local Bakkal. 20 minutes later someone would ring the bell (or more often shout from the street). But rather than them coming upstairs, my aunt and I would grab the cash, head to her balcony, put the money in a basket and lower it down to the delivery boy who would then fill it up with the groceries along with the leftover change whilst I'd hurriedly pull it back up excited to see what's inside.

Voila groceries delivered direct to your home.

Today the basket delivery system of Turkey has evolved and Getir, the Turkish eGrocery platform is leading the way, fulfilling over 5 million orders every month, in an average delivery time of just 10-minutes and raising over $170M to expand to the US and Europe.

It’s not just Turkey that’s working on speedy deliveries; there’s eGrocery platforms across the world delivering in record-breaking times; Berlin’s Gorilla (10-minutes), London's Weezy (15-minutes), China's Meituan (17-minutes) & US GoPuff (30-minutes) which collectively have raised over $7b to bring groceries to our doors.

Fuelled by covid shoppers who don't want to risk a trip to the store and who have gotten use to the convenience of at home ordering, the eGrocery space has grown massively in 2020 and investors are pouring cash into this sector.

Just this week we've seen big rounds from US-based online grocer Good Eggs which raised $100M, to Uber purchasing the alcohol delivery service Drizly for a whopping $1.1Bn. But companies can't compete on just delivery time alone, and as this space crowds I'll be interested to see the next evolution to set them apart - will it be product choice, ease of discovery, sustainability?

Here in Switzerland I'm an avid user of the online supermarket Farmy, but sometimes, I miss my childhood excitement of pulling up that basket hanging from my aunts balcony...