Game on: the 21 brands after the growing esports nutrition industry for gamers

Game on: the 21 brands after the growing esports nutrition industry for gamers

By
Louise Burfitt
September 21, 2021

🎮 What is it?

  • In recent years, computer and online gaming has gone from an at-home hobby to a massive global industry marked by huge competitions, events and corporate sponsorships. 
  • This is all described under the umbrella term ‘esports’, which refers to competition-level video gaming. 
  • And similar to the field of sports nutrition, a whole market had sprung up to fuel these competitive e-athletes - from supplements to energy drinks to meal replacements that claim to enhance concentration and memory among other things. 

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Professional video gamers need some of the same attributes as any athlete - stamina, laser focus, and an ability to perform at their best when it matters. Many brands are targeting these characteristics when developing new products.
  • And the market is a big one: last year, esports was worth $1.08 billion worldwide.

📈  The figures

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • The rise of esports as a major, global industry is clearly the main driver behind the growth of esports nutrition. That’s in terms of both increased viewing figures - up 8.7% year on year - and in the profile of professional e-athletes, who can now be influencers in their own right and sign lucrative advertising deals with brands. 
  • As the level of competition has become more serious, gaming sportsmen and women have come to care more about their physical and mental fitness. With higher stakes, professional gamers care more about keeping their health in check so products targeting their vision, focus and performance are welcome. 
  • And the loyal (and massive) esports audience - mostly millennial and Gen Z consumers - are also interested in gaming and receptive to the products recommended by their favourite gamers. 

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • From energy drinks to supplements, functional foods and gummies, the options in the esports nutrition space are varied. 
  • Some 50% of gaming products are energy drinks. Major energy drink brands have also got in on the esports action with sponsorships and advertising, opening up a new market for these companies. SInce the mid-noughties Red Bull has been a key sponsor of events hosted by Riot Games, while Monster Energy and Mountain Dew have also funded major tournaments. 
  • But a new wave of esports energy drink startups are targeting gamers exclusively, and opting for formulations less laden with sugar and additives than the traditional offerings. WRAITH Energy makes sugar-free energy drinks marketed for gamers, while Russian IBMA sells an energy powder drink mix.
  • The area of nootropics - chemicals thought to boost brain power - are also increasingly being used in products targeted at esports. These brain-energisers are thought to improve memory, focus, creative thinking and more. The UK’s Mind Lab and Beyond NRG are two leaders in this specific segment. 
  • Many brands are also trying to differentiate themselves from traditional energy drinks with more natural, healthier ingredients, such as coffeine in place of caffeine, the amino acid L-theanine, and adaptogens. Supplements to this effect are becoming more widely available: check out MADMONQ, G FUEL and Eu Natural, and Gamers Only for caffeine-free gamer drinks.
  • A handful of companies, including Runtime in Berlin and CTRL in the US, offer complete nutrition meal replacements to help gamers survive long hours of streaming or gaming. The former markets their product, designed to promote endurance and concentration, to both pros and amateurs, while CTRL meal replacement shakes are already available in 750 stores across the States. 
  • Gamers have very specific needs compared to other athletes and some brands are honing in on particular demands, specialising to attract their ideal customers. Neubria Zone, in the UK, for example make gamer supplements developed to aid players’ vision, which can be affected by long sessions staring at a screen. NAU Drinks, in Sweden, meanwhile, are targeted gamers’ need for cognitive excellence with a specialised drink.  
  • Several big-name food and beverage brands have become involved with esports sponsorship and advertising at events, including Coca-Cola, Kelloggs, Chipotle and McDonald’s. This shows what was once a niche segment is already going mainstream. 

👀 Who? (21 companies in this space)

⛽ Case study: G FUEL 

  • G FUEL is based in the USA and has been active in esports since 2012.
  • Owned by parent company Gamma Labs, they’ve successfully styled themselves as the ‘official’ energy drink of esports.
  • The brand also differentiate themselves from conventional energy drinks with their ‘healthier’ ingredients. 
  • Alongside canned energy drinks, the leading brand also sells powdered versions, energy crystals and hydration formulas. 
  • With over 1 billion social media followers and partnerships with major brands including FaZe Clan, G FUEL has a pretty good claim to its ‘official’ title, and continues to invest heavily in new flavour and innovation. 
  • In 2019 G FUEL signed a partnership, slated to run for years, with Enthusiast Gaming and Luminosity Gaming

🥃 Case study: Beyond NRG 

  • UK nootropics brand Beyond NRG makes zero-sugar powdered energy drinks marketed at gamers. 
  • Containing nootropics, these active ingredients claim to offer gamers a powerful boost of natural energy. The formula features coffeine (an extract from green coffee beans), acetyl-l-carnitine (which boosts memory) and n-acetyl-l-tyrosine (to enhance performance under stress). 
  • The brand was created specifically with the gaming community and industry in mind, with the company stating that the vitamin, mineral and nootropics blend is useful for hobby gamers as well as competitive players.  
  • Beyond NRG styles itself as a ‘healthier’ energy drink, thanks to botanical ingredients and its lack of taurine, caffeine and sugar.
  • It launched in the UK in 2020 and announced partnerships with UK esports companies Excel Esports and Endpoint in 2021.

👍The good

  • With the rise of esports as a lucrative industry, investment is flooding into the sector, with investors keen to fund hot new e-nutrition products that look set to do well.
  • And many products have cross-party appeal: supplements aimed at visual health and energy drinks that improve focus and concentration don’t have to limit themselves to gamers. In the new WFH era, screen use is on the up for many people, who could be open to trying these sorts of products too. 
  • What’s more, the COVID-19 pandemic has seen a massive rise in amateur video gaming - now’s the time for brands that have previously limited themselves to pro customers to branch out. 

👎 The bad

  • There is a huge potential market for gaming-specific food and drink products, given the amount of gamers globally, but this doesn’t mean brands are guaranteed success. Though there’s loads of innovation going on in the sector, supplement and gamer-specific energy drink consumption remains low among amateurs. Brands may need to target a broader audience to remain successful. 
  • Moreover, health claims on esports products don’t generally have to be externally substantiated and many - like ‘better focus’ - are subjective. Consumers are likely to quickly see through dishonest statements and take their wallets elsewhere. 
  • And gamers aren’t necessarily seen as the most health-conscious demographic, so convincing them of the potential benefits of expensive or complex products may not be an easy win. 

 💡The bottom line

  • As the esports industry continue to grow as a whole, the opportunities for esports nutrition will rise in tandem. Esports dietary supplements and drinks are slated for exponential growth. 
  • Of course, as the market becomes more crowded, brands will have to offer a unique value proposition to stand out, with solid, scientifically-backed claims and ingredients to lure in gamers

How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

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🎮 What is it?

  • In recent years, computer and online gaming has gone from an at-home hobby to a massive global industry marked by huge competitions, events and corporate sponsorships. 
  • This is all described under the umbrella term ‘esports’, which refers to competition-level video gaming. 
  • And similar to the field of sports nutrition, a whole market had sprung up to fuel these competitive e-athletes - from supplements to energy drinks to meal replacements that claim to enhance concentration and memory among other things. 

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Professional video gamers need some of the same attributes as any athlete - stamina, laser focus, and an ability to perform at their best when it matters. Many brands are targeting these characteristics when developing new products.
  • And the market is a big one: last year, esports was worth $1.08 billion worldwide.

📈  The figures

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • The rise of esports as a major, global industry is clearly the main driver behind the growth of esports nutrition. That’s in terms of both increased viewing figures - up 8.7% year on year - and in the profile of professional e-athletes, who can now be influencers in their own right and sign lucrative advertising deals with brands. 
  • As the level of competition has become more serious, gaming sportsmen and women have come to care more about their physical and mental fitness. With higher stakes, professional gamers care more about keeping their health in check so products targeting their vision, focus and performance are welcome. 
  • And the loyal (and massive) esports audience - mostly millennial and Gen Z consumers - are also interested in gaming and receptive to the products recommended by their favourite gamers. 

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • From energy drinks to supplements, functional foods and gummies, the options in the esports nutrition space are varied. 
  • Some 50% of gaming products are energy drinks. Major energy drink brands have also got in on the esports action with sponsorships and advertising, opening up a new market for these companies. SInce the mid-noughties Red Bull has been a key sponsor of events hosted by Riot Games, while Monster Energy and Mountain Dew have also funded major tournaments. 
  • But a new wave of esports energy drink startups are targeting gamers exclusively, and opting for formulations less laden with sugar and additives than the traditional offerings. WRAITH Energy makes sugar-free energy drinks marketed for gamers, while Russian IBMA sells an energy powder drink mix.
  • The area of nootropics - chemicals thought to boost brain power - are also increasingly being used in products targeted at esports. These brain-energisers are thought to improve memory, focus, creative thinking and more. The UK’s Mind Lab and Beyond NRG are two leaders in this specific segment. 
  • Many brands are also trying to differentiate themselves from traditional energy drinks with more natural, healthier ingredients, such as coffeine in place of caffeine, the amino acid L-theanine, and adaptogens. Supplements to this effect are becoming more widely available: check out MADMONQ, G FUEL and Eu Natural, and Gamers Only for caffeine-free gamer drinks.
  • A handful of companies, including Runtime in Berlin and CTRL in the US, offer complete nutrition meal replacements to help gamers survive long hours of streaming or gaming. The former markets their product, designed to promote endurance and concentration, to both pros and amateurs, while CTRL meal replacement shakes are already available in 750 stores across the States. 
  • Gamers have very specific needs compared to other athletes and some brands are honing in on particular demands, specialising to attract their ideal customers. Neubria Zone, in the UK, for example make gamer supplements developed to aid players’ vision, which can be affected by long sessions staring at a screen. NAU Drinks, in Sweden, meanwhile, are targeted gamers’ need for cognitive excellence with a specialised drink.  
  • Several big-name food and beverage brands have become involved with esports sponsorship and advertising at events, including Coca-Cola, Kelloggs, Chipotle and McDonald’s. This shows what was once a niche segment is already going mainstream. 

👀 Who? (21 companies in this space)

⛽ Case study: G FUEL 

  • G FUEL is based in the USA and has been active in esports since 2012.
  • Owned by parent company Gamma Labs, they’ve successfully styled themselves as the ‘official’ energy drink of esports.
  • The brand also differentiate themselves from conventional energy drinks with their ‘healthier’ ingredients. 
  • Alongside canned energy drinks, the leading brand also sells powdered versions, energy crystals and hydration formulas. 
  • With over 1 billion social media followers and partnerships with major brands including FaZe Clan, G FUEL has a pretty good claim to its ‘official’ title, and continues to invest heavily in new flavour and innovation. 
  • In 2019 G FUEL signed a partnership, slated to run for years, with Enthusiast Gaming and Luminosity Gaming

🥃 Case study: Beyond NRG 

  • UK nootropics brand Beyond NRG makes zero-sugar powdered energy drinks marketed at gamers. 
  • Containing nootropics, these active ingredients claim to offer gamers a powerful boost of natural energy. The formula features coffeine (an extract from green coffee beans), acetyl-l-carnitine (which boosts memory) and n-acetyl-l-tyrosine (to enhance performance under stress). 
  • The brand was created specifically with the gaming community and industry in mind, with the company stating that the vitamin, mineral and nootropics blend is useful for hobby gamers as well as competitive players.  
  • Beyond NRG styles itself as a ‘healthier’ energy drink, thanks to botanical ingredients and its lack of taurine, caffeine and sugar.
  • It launched in the UK in 2020 and announced partnerships with UK esports companies Excel Esports and Endpoint in 2021.

👍The good

  • With the rise of esports as a lucrative industry, investment is flooding into the sector, with investors keen to fund hot new e-nutrition products that look set to do well.
  • And many products have cross-party appeal: supplements aimed at visual health and energy drinks that improve focus and concentration don’t have to limit themselves to gamers. In the new WFH era, screen use is on the up for many people, who could be open to trying these sorts of products too. 
  • What’s more, the COVID-19 pandemic has seen a massive rise in amateur video gaming - now’s the time for brands that have previously limited themselves to pro customers to branch out. 

👎 The bad

  • There is a huge potential market for gaming-specific food and drink products, given the amount of gamers globally, but this doesn’t mean brands are guaranteed success. Though there’s loads of innovation going on in the sector, supplement and gamer-specific energy drink consumption remains low among amateurs. Brands may need to target a broader audience to remain successful. 
  • Moreover, health claims on esports products don’t generally have to be externally substantiated and many - like ‘better focus’ - are subjective. Consumers are likely to quickly see through dishonest statements and take their wallets elsewhere. 
  • And gamers aren’t necessarily seen as the most health-conscious demographic, so convincing them of the potential benefits of expensive or complex products may not be an easy win. 

 💡The bottom line

  • As the esports industry continue to grow as a whole, the opportunities for esports nutrition will rise in tandem. Esports dietary supplements and drinks are slated for exponential growth. 
  • Of course, as the market becomes more crowded, brands will have to offer a unique value proposition to stand out, with solid, scientifically-backed claims and ingredients to lure in gamers

How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

🎮 What is it?

  • In recent years, computer and online gaming has gone from an at-home hobby to a massive global industry marked by huge competitions, events and corporate sponsorships. 
  • This is all described under the umbrella term ‘esports’, which refers to competition-level video gaming. 
  • And similar to the field of sports nutrition, a whole market had sprung up to fuel these competitive e-athletes - from supplements to energy drinks to meal replacements that claim to enhance concentration and memory among other things. 

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Professional video gamers need some of the same attributes as any athlete - stamina, laser focus, and an ability to perform at their best when it matters. Many brands are targeting these characteristics when developing new products.
  • And the market is a big one: last year, esports was worth $1.08 billion worldwide.

📈  The figures

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • The rise of esports as a major, global industry is clearly the main driver behind the growth of esports nutrition. That’s in terms of both increased viewing figures - up 8.7% year on year - and in the profile of professional e-athletes, who can now be influencers in their own right and sign lucrative advertising deals with brands. 
  • As the level of competition has become more serious, gaming sportsmen and women have come to care more about their physical and mental fitness. With higher stakes, professional gamers care more about keeping their health in check so products targeting their vision, focus and performance are welcome. 
  • And the loyal (and massive) esports audience - mostly millennial and Gen Z consumers - are also interested in gaming and receptive to the products recommended by their favourite gamers. 

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • From energy drinks to supplements, functional foods and gummies, the options in the esports nutrition space are varied. 
  • Some 50% of gaming products are energy drinks. Major energy drink brands have also got in on the esports action with sponsorships and advertising, opening up a new market for these companies. SInce the mid-noughties Red Bull has been a key sponsor of events hosted by Riot Games, while Monster Energy and Mountain Dew have also funded major tournaments. 
  • But a new wave of esports energy drink startups are targeting gamers exclusively, and opting for formulations less laden with sugar and additives than the traditional offerings. WRAITH Energy makes sugar-free energy drinks marketed for gamers, while Russian IBMA sells an energy powder drink mix.
  • The area of nootropics - chemicals thought to boost brain power - are also increasingly being used in products targeted at esports. These brain-energisers are thought to improve memory, focus, creative thinking and more. The UK’s Mind Lab and Beyond NRG are two leaders in this specific segment. 
  • Many brands are also trying to differentiate themselves from traditional energy drinks with more natural, healthier ingredients, such as coffeine in place of caffeine, the amino acid L-theanine, and adaptogens. Supplements to this effect are becoming more widely available: check out MADMONQ, G FUEL and Eu Natural, and Gamers Only for caffeine-free gamer drinks.
  • A handful of companies, including Runtime in Berlin and CTRL in the US, offer complete nutrition meal replacements to help gamers survive long hours of streaming or gaming. The former markets their product, designed to promote endurance and concentration, to both pros and amateurs, while CTRL meal replacement shakes are already available in 750 stores across the States. 
  • Gamers have very specific needs compared to other athletes and some brands are honing in on particular demands, specialising to attract their ideal customers. Neubria Zone, in the UK, for example make gamer supplements developed to aid players’ vision, which can be affected by long sessions staring at a screen. NAU Drinks, in Sweden, meanwhile, are targeted gamers’ need for cognitive excellence with a specialised drink.  
  • Several big-name food and beverage brands have become involved with esports sponsorship and advertising at events, including Coca-Cola, Kelloggs, Chipotle and McDonald’s. This shows what was once a niche segment is already going mainstream. 

👀 Who? (21 companies in this space)

⛽ Case study: G FUEL 

  • G FUEL is based in the USA and has been active in esports since 2012.
  • Owned by parent company Gamma Labs, they’ve successfully styled themselves as the ‘official’ energy drink of esports.
  • The brand also differentiate themselves from conventional energy drinks with their ‘healthier’ ingredients. 
  • Alongside canned energy drinks, the leading brand also sells powdered versions, energy crystals and hydration formulas. 
  • With over 1 billion social media followers and partnerships with major brands including FaZe Clan, G FUEL has a pretty good claim to its ‘official’ title, and continues to invest heavily in new flavour and innovation. 
  • In 2019 G FUEL signed a partnership, slated to run for years, with Enthusiast Gaming and Luminosity Gaming

🥃 Case study: Beyond NRG 

  • UK nootropics brand Beyond NRG makes zero-sugar powdered energy drinks marketed at gamers. 
  • Containing nootropics, these active ingredients claim to offer gamers a powerful boost of natural energy. The formula features coffeine (an extract from green coffee beans), acetyl-l-carnitine (which boosts memory) and n-acetyl-l-tyrosine (to enhance performance under stress). 
  • The brand was created specifically with the gaming community and industry in mind, with the company stating that the vitamin, mineral and nootropics blend is useful for hobby gamers as well as competitive players.  
  • Beyond NRG styles itself as a ‘healthier’ energy drink, thanks to botanical ingredients and its lack of taurine, caffeine and sugar.
  • It launched in the UK in 2020 and announced partnerships with UK esports companies Excel Esports and Endpoint in 2021.

👍The good

  • With the rise of esports as a lucrative industry, investment is flooding into the sector, with investors keen to fund hot new e-nutrition products that look set to do well.
  • And many products have cross-party appeal: supplements aimed at visual health and energy drinks that improve focus and concentration don’t have to limit themselves to gamers. In the new WFH era, screen use is on the up for many people, who could be open to trying these sorts of products too. 
  • What’s more, the COVID-19 pandemic has seen a massive rise in amateur video gaming - now’s the time for brands that have previously limited themselves to pro customers to branch out. 

👎 The bad

  • There is a huge potential market for gaming-specific food and drink products, given the amount of gamers globally, but this doesn’t mean brands are guaranteed success. Though there’s loads of innovation going on in the sector, supplement and gamer-specific energy drink consumption remains low among amateurs. Brands may need to target a broader audience to remain successful. 
  • Moreover, health claims on esports products don’t generally have to be externally substantiated and many - like ‘better focus’ - are subjective. Consumers are likely to quickly see through dishonest statements and take their wallets elsewhere. 
  • And gamers aren’t necessarily seen as the most health-conscious demographic, so convincing them of the potential benefits of expensive or complex products may not be an easy win. 

 💡The bottom line

  • As the esports industry continue to grow as a whole, the opportunities for esports nutrition will rise in tandem. Esports dietary supplements and drinks are slated for exponential growth. 
  • Of course, as the market becomes more crowded, brands will have to offer a unique value proposition to stand out, with solid, scientifically-backed claims and ingredients to lure in gamers

How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

🎮 What is it?

  • In recent years, computer and online gaming has gone from an at-home hobby to a massive global industry marked by huge competitions, events and corporate sponsorships. 
  • This is all described under the umbrella term ‘esports’, which refers to competition-level video gaming. 
  • And similar to the field of sports nutrition, a whole market had sprung up to fuel these competitive e-athletes - from supplements to energy drinks to meal replacements that claim to enhance concentration and memory among other things. 

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Professional video gamers need some of the same attributes as any athlete - stamina, laser focus, and an ability to perform at their best when it matters. Many brands are targeting these characteristics when developing new products.
  • And the market is a big one: last year, esports was worth $1.08 billion worldwide.

📈  The figures

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • The rise of esports as a major, global industry is clearly the main driver behind the growth of esports nutrition. That’s in terms of both increased viewing figures - up 8.7% year on year - and in the profile of professional e-athletes, who can now be influencers in their own right and sign lucrative advertising deals with brands. 
  • As the level of competition has become more serious, gaming sportsmen and women have come to care more about their physical and mental fitness. With higher stakes, professional gamers care more about keeping their health in check so products targeting their vision, focus and performance are welcome. 
  • And the loyal (and massive) esports audience - mostly millennial and Gen Z consumers - are also interested in gaming and receptive to the products recommended by their favourite gamers. 

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • From energy drinks to supplements, functional foods and gummies, the options in the esports nutrition space are varied. 
  • Some 50% of gaming products are energy drinks. Major energy drink brands have also got in on the esports action with sponsorships and advertising, opening up a new market for these companies. SInce the mid-noughties Red Bull has been a key sponsor of events hosted by Riot Games, while Monster Energy and Mountain Dew have also funded major tournaments. 
  • But a new wave of esports energy drink startups are targeting gamers exclusively, and opting for formulations less laden with sugar and additives than the traditional offerings. WRAITH Energy makes sugar-free energy drinks marketed for gamers, while Russian IBMA sells an energy powder drink mix.
  • The area of nootropics - chemicals thought to boost brain power - are also increasingly being used in products targeted at esports. These brain-energisers are thought to improve memory, focus, creative thinking and more. The UK’s Mind Lab and Beyond NRG are two leaders in this specific segment. 
  • Many brands are also trying to differentiate themselves from traditional energy drinks with more natural, healthier ingredients, such as coffeine in place of caffeine, the amino acid L-theanine, and adaptogens. Supplements to this effect are becoming more widely available: check out MADMONQ, G FUEL and Eu Natural, and Gamers Only for caffeine-free gamer drinks.
  • A handful of companies, including Runtime in Berlin and CTRL in the US, offer complete nutrition meal replacements to help gamers survive long hours of streaming or gaming. The former markets their product, designed to promote endurance and concentration, to both pros and amateurs, while CTRL meal replacement shakes are already available in 750 stores across the States. 
  • Gamers have very specific needs compared to other athletes and some brands are honing in on particular demands, specialising to attract their ideal customers. Neubria Zone, in the UK, for example make gamer supplements developed to aid players’ vision, which can be affected by long sessions staring at a screen. NAU Drinks, in Sweden, meanwhile, are targeted gamers’ need for cognitive excellence with a specialised drink.  
  • Several big-name food and beverage brands have become involved with esports sponsorship and advertising at events, including Coca-Cola, Kelloggs, Chipotle and McDonald’s. This shows what was once a niche segment is already going mainstream. 

👀 Who? (21 companies in this space)

⛽ Case study: G FUEL 

  • G FUEL is based in the USA and has been active in esports since 2012.
  • Owned by parent company Gamma Labs, they’ve successfully styled themselves as the ‘official’ energy drink of esports.
  • The brand also differentiate themselves from conventional energy drinks with their ‘healthier’ ingredients. 
  • Alongside canned energy drinks, the leading brand also sells powdered versions, energy crystals and hydration formulas. 
  • With over 1 billion social media followers and partnerships with major brands including FaZe Clan, G FUEL has a pretty good claim to its ‘official’ title, and continues to invest heavily in new flavour and innovation. 
  • In 2019 G FUEL signed a partnership, slated to run for years, with Enthusiast Gaming and Luminosity Gaming

🥃 Case study: Beyond NRG 

  • UK nootropics brand Beyond NRG makes zero-sugar powdered energy drinks marketed at gamers. 
  • Containing nootropics, these active ingredients claim to offer gamers a powerful boost of natural energy. The formula features coffeine (an extract from green coffee beans), acetyl-l-carnitine (which boosts memory) and n-acetyl-l-tyrosine (to enhance performance under stress). 
  • The brand was created specifically with the gaming community and industry in mind, with the company stating that the vitamin, mineral and nootropics blend is useful for hobby gamers as well as competitive players.  
  • Beyond NRG styles itself as a ‘healthier’ energy drink, thanks to botanical ingredients and its lack of taurine, caffeine and sugar.
  • It launched in the UK in 2020 and announced partnerships with UK esports companies Excel Esports and Endpoint in 2021.

👍The good

  • With the rise of esports as a lucrative industry, investment is flooding into the sector, with investors keen to fund hot new e-nutrition products that look set to do well.
  • And many products have cross-party appeal: supplements aimed at visual health and energy drinks that improve focus and concentration don’t have to limit themselves to gamers. In the new WFH era, screen use is on the up for many people, who could be open to trying these sorts of products too. 
  • What’s more, the COVID-19 pandemic has seen a massive rise in amateur video gaming - now’s the time for brands that have previously limited themselves to pro customers to branch out. 

👎 The bad

  • There is a huge potential market for gaming-specific food and drink products, given the amount of gamers globally, but this doesn’t mean brands are guaranteed success. Though there’s loads of innovation going on in the sector, supplement and gamer-specific energy drink consumption remains low among amateurs. Brands may need to target a broader audience to remain successful. 
  • Moreover, health claims on esports products don’t generally have to be externally substantiated and many - like ‘better focus’ - are subjective. Consumers are likely to quickly see through dishonest statements and take their wallets elsewhere. 
  • And gamers aren’t necessarily seen as the most health-conscious demographic, so convincing them of the potential benefits of expensive or complex products may not be an easy win. 

 💡The bottom line

  • As the esports industry continue to grow as a whole, the opportunities for esports nutrition will rise in tandem. Esports dietary supplements and drinks are slated for exponential growth. 
  • Of course, as the market becomes more crowded, brands will have to offer a unique value proposition to stand out, with solid, scientifically-backed claims and ingredients to lure in gamers

How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

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