Finding an Advisor for your startup: The Who, How and Why

Finding an Advisor for your startup: The Who, How and Why

By
Sam Panzer
July 19, 2021

Founders aren't perfect.

Passionate, smart, gritty-as-hell, sure –– but no founding team is capable of solving all of the many problems a startup will face. And the best teams will be honest about what they don’t know, and ask for help.

Enter the startup advisor. They’re a pillar of expertise, sounding board for great (and bad) ideas, and a channel for key introductions to partners, new hires, and investors. It’s a flexible concept, but generally advisors round up the strengths of a founding team with deep domain knowledge and a set of outside eyes for the startup.

Like angel investors, accelerators, VCs and CVCs, advisors are a key piece of startup infrastructure. So this week, we’re diving in on advisors: who they are, what they do, and how to find one.

p.s. looking for an advisor or looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

🤷 Who are advisors?

Advisors have relevant experience and a useful network they share to help startups navigate their early growth. Every advisor relationship is unique, but generally an advisor has two or three focus areas they can help with (i.e. fundraising, partnerships, marketing, sales strategy, or manufacturing). An advisor might be….

  • A well-connected founder who has fundraised before and can help navigate your early rounds
  • A corporate marketing leader who understands how to position a product
  • An accounting ace who can help optimize your cashflow and monitor your runway
  • An operations expert from a similar foodtech company who has navigated challenges relating to manufacturing or packaging a product

Typically, advisors only support a handful of companies (at most) as a side gig, with the exception of ‘exited’ founders or semi-retired professionals who spend most of their time advising.

🤔 What do advisors do?

Generally, an advisor is good at whatever your founding team isn’t. In foodtech, founders are often knowledgeable about a technology (i.e. fermentation, alt proteins, crop health) or skill (product marketing, sales). Or, they’re a business wiz with an MBA and an understanding of how good businesses operate.


But no matter how passionate and smart your founding team is, there are always going to be challenges you’ve never addressed before. Advisors know these challenges and can help you avoid common mistakes and think through problems. Their support usually comes in the form of:

🧠 Expert guidance: strategic support navigating core business challenges

👂 Sounding boards: a collaborative sparring partner to work through new ideas.

🤝 Key intros: an open rolodex of possible customers, distributors / manufacturers, and investors.

💵 Fundraising credibility: a “we’re serious!” stamp for investors, demonstrating external, expert validation for the startup’s idea.

The engagement looks different in every case, but typically is a more agile “hotline” relationship between the founding team and advisor, as well as standing check-ins. 

Many startups also engage several advisors together into an Advisory Board. This structure helps keep the founding team accountable and pools expertise.

👋 How can you find an advisor?

To identify where an advisor will make the largest impact, startups should first take an honest look at their strengths and weaknesses –– a classic SWOT analysis is a great way to map what help you need.

With that in mind, get the word out to your network. 

  • Tell your investors you’re looking for help and ask for intros
  • Post on LinkedIn asking if anybody knows an expert on a topic you need help with
  • Explore platforms like Kolabtree (platform for freelance scientists and industry experts)

We also asked a few founders for their tips on this topic, including Peter Schatzberg, CEO of Sweetheart Kitchen (multi-brand cloud kitchen), who tells foodtech founders “don't limit yourself to looking for advisor(s) in foodtech or from VCs / funds,” and recommends looking for “a seasoned veteran from an international corporate enterprise.” 

Schatzberg believes an advisor from a corporate setting offers “expertise driving for profitability, creating process and controllership, and learning how to lead. You know your domain, you are the startup person. So surround yourself with people that balance the equation.”

We also know there’s a huge appetite for mid-tier corporate leaders who want to get involved in food innovation and startups –– if you’re a startup with some connections working in Big Food & Big Ag don’t be afraid to drop a DM and ask if they know anybody who might help.

💡 Looking for an advisor fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match


Meet your future advisor at the FoodHack Summit 👋

Finding advisors is all about who you know. And where better to meet your match then at this years FoodHack Summit

With 500 industry attendees joining, from scrappy and venture-backed startups to big name VC funds, multinationals and seasoned founders, you're sure meet your match.

Grab one of the last few remaining early bird tickets here and use code NEWSLETTER-10 for a discount at checkout.


🤷 How can I start advising?

First, become an expert in a problem startups need help solving. Advisors aren’t just a friendly face –– they have real-world experience to offer.

With that, make it clear what your expertise is on LinkedIn. Engage regularly on topics that interest you and include your interest area in your headline (i.e. “Operations Director interested in food innovation & advising startups”).

Then, start approaching startups in the areas that interest you, noting the near-universal truth that startups love talking about what they’re doing. Ask for a 30-minute Zoom coffee with founders and see what challenges they are facing, and if it’s something you can help with.

🧠 Looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

💵 Who pays who?

Advisors are usually paid with one of the following:

🥧 Equity. Depending on the startup’s size and stage (and the advisor’s scope), startups often give an equity stake a 0.25 - 1% to the advisor. Provides a strong incentive to the advisor to actively support the startup in hopes of a growth in their share value.

💵 Cash. While challenging at an early stage, fees for advisors can be a highly effective and efficient investment, expanding your team’s brain power and expertise without shelling out another salary.

So, how much exactly?

It is common to calculate compensation (whether cash or equity) based either on an hourly rate (i.e. $200 / hour) or a fraction of a full-time compensation plan. 

Example: if you expect an advisor to assist 2 hours per week, that’s 5% of a full-time role. If a full-time version of that role would be a $100K salary, a $5K annual fee (either in cash or a share of equity) could be a fair rate.

While typically the startup compensates the advisor, it’s also not uncommon for advisors to also invest in the startup to have some ‘skin in the game.’

💡 Final Thoughts & What Comes Next

Every startup needs advisors. Maybe they’re your existing investors, but more often than not, the bit of equity or cash you pay to a separate advisor is a must-do to fill in the gaps of your founding team.

As with angels, the infrastructure to find advisors is unfortunately murky. It’s a messy web of who you know and how you get the word out. That’s a big reason why accelerators can be so valuable: they’ve pooled together domain experts for participating startups.

We do hope to see more platforms emerge here to connect startups with advisors, likely hosted by existing media companies, accelerators, or investors.

Advisor and startup matchmaking is something we hope to do more of here at FoodHack. We just launched a new feature - Advisor x Startup Matchmaking to help better connect both sides. If you have any other ideas for how we can best support the space here, let us know, we’re all ears 💘

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Founders aren't perfect.

Passionate, smart, gritty-as-hell, sure –– but no founding team is capable of solving all of the many problems a startup will face. And the best teams will be honest about what they don’t know, and ask for help.

Enter the startup advisor. They’re a pillar of expertise, sounding board for great (and bad) ideas, and a channel for key introductions to partners, new hires, and investors. It’s a flexible concept, but generally advisors round up the strengths of a founding team with deep domain knowledge and a set of outside eyes for the startup.

Like angel investors, accelerators, VCs and CVCs, advisors are a key piece of startup infrastructure. So this week, we’re diving in on advisors: who they are, what they do, and how to find one.

p.s. looking for an advisor or looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

🤷 Who are advisors?

Advisors have relevant experience and a useful network they share to help startups navigate their early growth. Every advisor relationship is unique, but generally an advisor has two or three focus areas they can help with (i.e. fundraising, partnerships, marketing, sales strategy, or manufacturing). An advisor might be….

  • A well-connected founder who has fundraised before and can help navigate your early rounds
  • A corporate marketing leader who understands how to position a product
  • An accounting ace who can help optimize your cashflow and monitor your runway
  • An operations expert from a similar foodtech company who has navigated challenges relating to manufacturing or packaging a product

Typically, advisors only support a handful of companies (at most) as a side gig, with the exception of ‘exited’ founders or semi-retired professionals who spend most of their time advising.

🤔 What do advisors do?

Generally, an advisor is good at whatever your founding team isn’t. In foodtech, founders are often knowledgeable about a technology (i.e. fermentation, alt proteins, crop health) or skill (product marketing, sales). Or, they’re a business wiz with an MBA and an understanding of how good businesses operate.


But no matter how passionate and smart your founding team is, there are always going to be challenges you’ve never addressed before. Advisors know these challenges and can help you avoid common mistakes and think through problems. Their support usually comes in the form of:

🧠 Expert guidance: strategic support navigating core business challenges

👂 Sounding boards: a collaborative sparring partner to work through new ideas.

🤝 Key intros: an open rolodex of possible customers, distributors / manufacturers, and investors.

💵 Fundraising credibility: a “we’re serious!” stamp for investors, demonstrating external, expert validation for the startup’s idea.

The engagement looks different in every case, but typically is a more agile “hotline” relationship between the founding team and advisor, as well as standing check-ins. 

Many startups also engage several advisors together into an Advisory Board. This structure helps keep the founding team accountable and pools expertise.

👋 How can you find an advisor?

To identify where an advisor will make the largest impact, startups should first take an honest look at their strengths and weaknesses –– a classic SWOT analysis is a great way to map what help you need.

With that in mind, get the word out to your network. 

  • Tell your investors you’re looking for help and ask for intros
  • Post on LinkedIn asking if anybody knows an expert on a topic you need help with
  • Explore platforms like Kolabtree (platform for freelance scientists and industry experts)

We also asked a few founders for their tips on this topic, including Peter Schatzberg, CEO of Sweetheart Kitchen (multi-brand cloud kitchen), who tells foodtech founders “don't limit yourself to looking for advisor(s) in foodtech or from VCs / funds,” and recommends looking for “a seasoned veteran from an international corporate enterprise.” 

Schatzberg believes an advisor from a corporate setting offers “expertise driving for profitability, creating process and controllership, and learning how to lead. You know your domain, you are the startup person. So surround yourself with people that balance the equation.”

We also know there’s a huge appetite for mid-tier corporate leaders who want to get involved in food innovation and startups –– if you’re a startup with some connections working in Big Food & Big Ag don’t be afraid to drop a DM and ask if they know anybody who might help.

💡 Looking for an advisor fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match


Meet your future advisor at the FoodHack Summit 👋

Finding advisors is all about who you know. And where better to meet your match then at this years FoodHack Summit

With 500 industry attendees joining, from scrappy and venture-backed startups to big name VC funds, multinationals and seasoned founders, you're sure meet your match.

Grab one of the last few remaining early bird tickets here and use code NEWSLETTER-10 for a discount at checkout.


🤷 How can I start advising?

First, become an expert in a problem startups need help solving. Advisors aren’t just a friendly face –– they have real-world experience to offer.

With that, make it clear what your expertise is on LinkedIn. Engage regularly on topics that interest you and include your interest area in your headline (i.e. “Operations Director interested in food innovation & advising startups”).

Then, start approaching startups in the areas that interest you, noting the near-universal truth that startups love talking about what they’re doing. Ask for a 30-minute Zoom coffee with founders and see what challenges they are facing, and if it’s something you can help with.

🧠 Looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

💵 Who pays who?

Advisors are usually paid with one of the following:

🥧 Equity. Depending on the startup’s size and stage (and the advisor’s scope), startups often give an equity stake a 0.25 - 1% to the advisor. Provides a strong incentive to the advisor to actively support the startup in hopes of a growth in their share value.

💵 Cash. While challenging at an early stage, fees for advisors can be a highly effective and efficient investment, expanding your team’s brain power and expertise without shelling out another salary.

So, how much exactly?

It is common to calculate compensation (whether cash or equity) based either on an hourly rate (i.e. $200 / hour) or a fraction of a full-time compensation plan. 

Example: if you expect an advisor to assist 2 hours per week, that’s 5% of a full-time role. If a full-time version of that role would be a $100K salary, a $5K annual fee (either in cash or a share of equity) could be a fair rate.

While typically the startup compensates the advisor, it’s also not uncommon for advisors to also invest in the startup to have some ‘skin in the game.’

💡 Final Thoughts & What Comes Next

Every startup needs advisors. Maybe they’re your existing investors, but more often than not, the bit of equity or cash you pay to a separate advisor is a must-do to fill in the gaps of your founding team.

As with angels, the infrastructure to find advisors is unfortunately murky. It’s a messy web of who you know and how you get the word out. That’s a big reason why accelerators can be so valuable: they’ve pooled together domain experts for participating startups.

We do hope to see more platforms emerge here to connect startups with advisors, likely hosted by existing media companies, accelerators, or investors.

Advisor and startup matchmaking is something we hope to do more of here at FoodHack. We just launched a new feature - Advisor x Startup Matchmaking to help better connect both sides. If you have any other ideas for how we can best support the space here, let us know, we’re all ears 💘

Founders aren't perfect.

Passionate, smart, gritty-as-hell, sure –– but no founding team is capable of solving all of the many problems a startup will face. And the best teams will be honest about what they don’t know, and ask for help.

Enter the startup advisor. They’re a pillar of expertise, sounding board for great (and bad) ideas, and a channel for key introductions to partners, new hires, and investors. It’s a flexible concept, but generally advisors round up the strengths of a founding team with deep domain knowledge and a set of outside eyes for the startup.

Like angel investors, accelerators, VCs and CVCs, advisors are a key piece of startup infrastructure. So this week, we’re diving in on advisors: who they are, what they do, and how to find one.

p.s. looking for an advisor or looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

🤷 Who are advisors?

Advisors have relevant experience and a useful network they share to help startups navigate their early growth. Every advisor relationship is unique, but generally an advisor has two or three focus areas they can help with (i.e. fundraising, partnerships, marketing, sales strategy, or manufacturing). An advisor might be….

  • A well-connected founder who has fundraised before and can help navigate your early rounds
  • A corporate marketing leader who understands how to position a product
  • An accounting ace who can help optimize your cashflow and monitor your runway
  • An operations expert from a similar foodtech company who has navigated challenges relating to manufacturing or packaging a product

Typically, advisors only support a handful of companies (at most) as a side gig, with the exception of ‘exited’ founders or semi-retired professionals who spend most of their time advising.

🤔 What do advisors do?

Generally, an advisor is good at whatever your founding team isn’t. In foodtech, founders are often knowledgeable about a technology (i.e. fermentation, alt proteins, crop health) or skill (product marketing, sales). Or, they’re a business wiz with an MBA and an understanding of how good businesses operate.


But no matter how passionate and smart your founding team is, there are always going to be challenges you’ve never addressed before. Advisors know these challenges and can help you avoid common mistakes and think through problems. Their support usually comes in the form of:

🧠 Expert guidance: strategic support navigating core business challenges

👂 Sounding boards: a collaborative sparring partner to work through new ideas.

🤝 Key intros: an open rolodex of possible customers, distributors / manufacturers, and investors.

💵 Fundraising credibility: a “we’re serious!” stamp for investors, demonstrating external, expert validation for the startup’s idea.

The engagement looks different in every case, but typically is a more agile “hotline” relationship between the founding team and advisor, as well as standing check-ins. 

Many startups also engage several advisors together into an Advisory Board. This structure helps keep the founding team accountable and pools expertise.

👋 How can you find an advisor?

To identify where an advisor will make the largest impact, startups should first take an honest look at their strengths and weaknesses –– a classic SWOT analysis is a great way to map what help you need.

With that in mind, get the word out to your network. 

  • Tell your investors you’re looking for help and ask for intros
  • Post on LinkedIn asking if anybody knows an expert on a topic you need help with
  • Explore platforms like Kolabtree (platform for freelance scientists and industry experts)

We also asked a few founders for their tips on this topic, including Peter Schatzberg, CEO of Sweetheart Kitchen (multi-brand cloud kitchen), who tells foodtech founders “don't limit yourself to looking for advisor(s) in foodtech or from VCs / funds,” and recommends looking for “a seasoned veteran from an international corporate enterprise.” 

Schatzberg believes an advisor from a corporate setting offers “expertise driving for profitability, creating process and controllership, and learning how to lead. You know your domain, you are the startup person. So surround yourself with people that balance the equation.”

We also know there’s a huge appetite for mid-tier corporate leaders who want to get involved in food innovation and startups –– if you’re a startup with some connections working in Big Food & Big Ag don’t be afraid to drop a DM and ask if they know anybody who might help.

💡 Looking for an advisor fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match


Meet your future advisor at the FoodHack Summit 👋

Finding advisors is all about who you know. And where better to meet your match then at this years FoodHack Summit

With 500 industry attendees joining, from scrappy and venture-backed startups to big name VC funds, multinationals and seasoned founders, you're sure meet your match.

Grab one of the last few remaining early bird tickets here and use code NEWSLETTER-10 for a discount at checkout.


🤷 How can I start advising?

First, become an expert in a problem startups need help solving. Advisors aren’t just a friendly face –– they have real-world experience to offer.

With that, make it clear what your expertise is on LinkedIn. Engage regularly on topics that interest you and include your interest area in your headline (i.e. “Operations Director interested in food innovation & advising startups”).

Then, start approaching startups in the areas that interest you, noting the near-universal truth that startups love talking about what they’re doing. Ask for a 30-minute Zoom coffee with founders and see what challenges they are facing, and if it’s something you can help with.

🧠 Looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

💵 Who pays who?

Advisors are usually paid with one of the following:

🥧 Equity. Depending on the startup’s size and stage (and the advisor’s scope), startups often give an equity stake a 0.25 - 1% to the advisor. Provides a strong incentive to the advisor to actively support the startup in hopes of a growth in their share value.

💵 Cash. While challenging at an early stage, fees for advisors can be a highly effective and efficient investment, expanding your team’s brain power and expertise without shelling out another salary.

So, how much exactly?

It is common to calculate compensation (whether cash or equity) based either on an hourly rate (i.e. $200 / hour) or a fraction of a full-time compensation plan. 

Example: if you expect an advisor to assist 2 hours per week, that’s 5% of a full-time role. If a full-time version of that role would be a $100K salary, a $5K annual fee (either in cash or a share of equity) could be a fair rate.

While typically the startup compensates the advisor, it’s also not uncommon for advisors to also invest in the startup to have some ‘skin in the game.’

💡 Final Thoughts & What Comes Next

Every startup needs advisors. Maybe they’re your existing investors, but more often than not, the bit of equity or cash you pay to a separate advisor is a must-do to fill in the gaps of your founding team.

As with angels, the infrastructure to find advisors is unfortunately murky. It’s a messy web of who you know and how you get the word out. That’s a big reason why accelerators can be so valuable: they’ve pooled together domain experts for participating startups.

We do hope to see more platforms emerge here to connect startups with advisors, likely hosted by existing media companies, accelerators, or investors.

Advisor and startup matchmaking is something we hope to do more of here at FoodHack. We just launched a new feature - Advisor x Startup Matchmaking to help better connect both sides. If you have any other ideas for how we can best support the space here, let us know, we’re all ears 💘

Founders aren't perfect.

Passionate, smart, gritty-as-hell, sure –– but no founding team is capable of solving all of the many problems a startup will face. And the best teams will be honest about what they don’t know, and ask for help.

Enter the startup advisor. They’re a pillar of expertise, sounding board for great (and bad) ideas, and a channel for key introductions to partners, new hires, and investors. It’s a flexible concept, but generally advisors round up the strengths of a founding team with deep domain knowledge and a set of outside eyes for the startup.

Like angel investors, accelerators, VCs and CVCs, advisors are a key piece of startup infrastructure. So this week, we’re diving in on advisors: who they are, what they do, and how to find one.

p.s. looking for an advisor or looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

🤷 Who are advisors?

Advisors have relevant experience and a useful network they share to help startups navigate their early growth. Every advisor relationship is unique, but generally an advisor has two or three focus areas they can help with (i.e. fundraising, partnerships, marketing, sales strategy, or manufacturing). An advisor might be….

  • A well-connected founder who has fundraised before and can help navigate your early rounds
  • A corporate marketing leader who understands how to position a product
  • An accounting ace who can help optimize your cashflow and monitor your runway
  • An operations expert from a similar foodtech company who has navigated challenges relating to manufacturing or packaging a product

Typically, advisors only support a handful of companies (at most) as a side gig, with the exception of ‘exited’ founders or semi-retired professionals who spend most of their time advising.

🤔 What do advisors do?

Generally, an advisor is good at whatever your founding team isn’t. In foodtech, founders are often knowledgeable about a technology (i.e. fermentation, alt proteins, crop health) or skill (product marketing, sales). Or, they’re a business wiz with an MBA and an understanding of how good businesses operate.


But no matter how passionate and smart your founding team is, there are always going to be challenges you’ve never addressed before. Advisors know these challenges and can help you avoid common mistakes and think through problems. Their support usually comes in the form of:

🧠 Expert guidance: strategic support navigating core business challenges

👂 Sounding boards: a collaborative sparring partner to work through new ideas.

🤝 Key intros: an open rolodex of possible customers, distributors / manufacturers, and investors.

💵 Fundraising credibility: a “we’re serious!” stamp for investors, demonstrating external, expert validation for the startup’s idea.

The engagement looks different in every case, but typically is a more agile “hotline” relationship between the founding team and advisor, as well as standing check-ins. 

Many startups also engage several advisors together into an Advisory Board. This structure helps keep the founding team accountable and pools expertise.

👋 How can you find an advisor?

To identify where an advisor will make the largest impact, startups should first take an honest look at their strengths and weaknesses –– a classic SWOT analysis is a great way to map what help you need.

With that in mind, get the word out to your network. 

  • Tell your investors you’re looking for help and ask for intros
  • Post on LinkedIn asking if anybody knows an expert on a topic you need help with
  • Explore platforms like Kolabtree (platform for freelance scientists and industry experts)

We also asked a few founders for their tips on this topic, including Peter Schatzberg, CEO of Sweetheart Kitchen (multi-brand cloud kitchen), who tells foodtech founders “don't limit yourself to looking for advisor(s) in foodtech or from VCs / funds,” and recommends looking for “a seasoned veteran from an international corporate enterprise.” 

Schatzberg believes an advisor from a corporate setting offers “expertise driving for profitability, creating process and controllership, and learning how to lead. You know your domain, you are the startup person. So surround yourself with people that balance the equation.”

We also know there’s a huge appetite for mid-tier corporate leaders who want to get involved in food innovation and startups –– if you’re a startup with some connections working in Big Food & Big Ag don’t be afraid to drop a DM and ask if they know anybody who might help.

💡 Looking for an advisor fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match


Meet your future advisor at the FoodHack Summit 👋

Finding advisors is all about who you know. And where better to meet your match then at this years FoodHack Summit

With 500 industry attendees joining, from scrappy and venture-backed startups to big name VC funds, multinationals and seasoned founders, you're sure meet your match.

Grab one of the last few remaining early bird tickets here and use code NEWSLETTER-10 for a discount at checkout.


🤷 How can I start advising?

First, become an expert in a problem startups need help solving. Advisors aren’t just a friendly face –– they have real-world experience to offer.

With that, make it clear what your expertise is on LinkedIn. Engage regularly on topics that interest you and include your interest area in your headline (i.e. “Operations Director interested in food innovation & advising startups”).

Then, start approaching startups in the areas that interest you, noting the near-universal truth that startups love talking about what they’re doing. Ask for a 30-minute Zoom coffee with founders and see what challenges they are facing, and if it’s something you can help with.

🧠 Looking to advise startups? Fill in the form here and we'll let you know when we've found a match

💵 Who pays who?

Advisors are usually paid with one of the following:

🥧 Equity. Depending on the startup’s size and stage (and the advisor’s scope), startups often give an equity stake a 0.25 - 1% to the advisor. Provides a strong incentive to the advisor to actively support the startup in hopes of a growth in their share value.

💵 Cash. While challenging at an early stage, fees for advisors can be a highly effective and efficient investment, expanding your team’s brain power and expertise without shelling out another salary.

So, how much exactly?

It is common to calculate compensation (whether cash or equity) based either on an hourly rate (i.e. $200 / hour) or a fraction of a full-time compensation plan. 

Example: if you expect an advisor to assist 2 hours per week, that’s 5% of a full-time role. If a full-time version of that role would be a $100K salary, a $5K annual fee (either in cash or a share of equity) could be a fair rate.

While typically the startup compensates the advisor, it’s also not uncommon for advisors to also invest in the startup to have some ‘skin in the game.’

💡 Final Thoughts & What Comes Next

Every startup needs advisors. Maybe they’re your existing investors, but more often than not, the bit of equity or cash you pay to a separate advisor is a must-do to fill in the gaps of your founding team.

As with angels, the infrastructure to find advisors is unfortunately murky. It’s a messy web of who you know and how you get the word out. That’s a big reason why accelerators can be so valuable: they’ve pooled together domain experts for participating startups.

We do hope to see more platforms emerge here to connect startups with advisors, likely hosted by existing media companies, accelerators, or investors.

Advisor and startup matchmaking is something we hope to do more of here at FoodHack. We just launched a new feature - Advisor x Startup Matchmaking to help better connect both sides. If you have any other ideas for how we can best support the space here, let us know, we’re all ears 💘

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