Forget craft beer. Craft cider is the next big thing.

Forget craft beer. Craft cider is the next big thing.

By
Emilie Dellecker
September 9, 2020

Until very recently, the odds of me ordering an alcoholic cider at a terrace, even on a hot summer day, were slim to none. I always thought of apple cider as an overly sweet drink fit mostly to accompany a good crepe in Brittany. No more. But recently, I tasted craft cider and a whole new fascinating world opened to me.

Complex savors and acidity, varying sweetness and bubbles. After tasting a few more (yes, they really are good), I realised I was not alone in having discovered this. In fact, craft cider is the next big thing in alcoholic beverages: the global market is expected to reach USD 5.37 billion by 2025, growing 3.1% per year from 2019 to 2025. Driven in particular by millennials who demand authenticity, quality and innovation in alcoholic beverages, the category is well-positioned to replicate the success craft beer has seen in recent years. 

What exactly is “craft” cider? There is no clear definition, according to Pilango, a UK based award winning independent cider retailer. But like craft beer, consumers expect craft cideries to be independent, and produce small batches that reflect a local know-how. Most importantly, craft cider is expected to be made out of high quality (local) ingredients, as opposed to what mainstream ciders have been doing with concentrated apple juice, sugar and water. Reinventing how cider is made and valued is very similar to what happened in smaller breweries in the past 15-20 years. And yet craft cider is quite different from beer, and could even potentially outdo beer on several fronts.

Pommeliers wanted

While there has been a tendency to make and serve cider at the same volume and price as beer, cider is a much more time and labor intensive drink more akin to wine-making.

Start with the terroir. The type of apple or the type of blend is critical in creating a good, distinctive cider. Each blend lends different flavor and structural components, the same way a well-balanced Bordeaux mixes the juicy roundness of Merlot with the structure and intensity of Cabernet grape. Cider’s fermentation process is also technically closer to wine production than that of beer using fruit juice rather than watered-down cereal mash. Like with wine, high-tannin and/or high-acid fruit is key for quality production - all in the right balance.

In a recent interview with the Telegraph, Felix Nash, founder of the Fine Cider company said it well: “We will soon be comfortable enough ordering ciders by apple variety with ‘pommeliers’ able to intrinsic customers on tasting notes and food pairing”. And just like with a grand-cru, prices can skyrock. Forbes, recently covered the release of a $100 bottle, the Rosalita dry rosé, a special cider made with rare cherries from an innovative Michigan cidery..

An eco-friendly drink

The alcohol industry as a whole has a significant negative impact on the environment to be sure. This includes farming practices themselves (use of fertilizer, water use, land use management, transportation) as well as the distillery process (energy use, water use), as well as packaging, refrigeration and transport.

But the craft cider making process is as green as it gets. Compared to other alcoholic beverages, cider making is carbon efficient. Local apples are handpicked, cidreries use wild fermentation techniques, natural cellar temperatures are used to control fermentation. It is also much more efficient in terms of water use, the apple juice being the only ingredient, unlike the water that needs to be added to barley to make beer. Most craft ciders are also produced using foraged and local fruits, sometimes even contributing to its neighborhood food waste reduction. Apple orchards contribute to safeguard biodiversity by providing habitats for a large range of wildlife. The apple trees store carbon more than vineyards and unlike cereals.

Believe it or not, craft cider is also better for your health. While it remains an alcoholic beverage to be consumed in moderation, it is gluten-free and contains lots of vitamin C.

Seems to me those are key ingredients to make craft cider the next big thing.  

Meet the innovators

I sat down with Alexandre Luyet, FoodHack Ambassador in Valais (Switzerland) and serial entrepreneur. I asked him why he decided to launch his cider brand, Guillaume, in 2020 and where the opportunity lies.

  • How did you get the idea of making cider?

    Alexandre:
    It dates back from my first travels in the UK where I discovered cider in pubs. It wasn’t something I was familiar with but after that, the more I tasted it , the more I found it fascinating. A few years later, after having talked to a fellow entrepreneur on his way to produce his own cider, I decided to do some research and it helped me realize all the potential of cider.. For 2 years, we organized blind tasting sessions and experiments to uncover what could be done around this beverage. The initial idea was to create something brute but, when I analyzed the result of our blind test, I realized the market was not there yet and we needed to start with something sweeter and more delicate. 

www.guillaumecider.ch
  • Why did you think it was the right moment to launch a cider brand?

    A:
    Cider is fully part of the local & authentic consumer trend. It resonates with the millennials values which are  more conscious and demanding when it comes to what they eat and drink. Also, the recent explosion of the craft beer market will facilitate consumers' approach to cider. When you have experienced different sorts of beers or wines, you’re more open to discovering other types of drinks, such as craft ciders. Today consumers want something different and unique that fit their lifestyles. Cider is vegan, gluten-free and more environmentally friendly than most mainstream beverages. It can be deeply tight to consumers' origins. it therefore has the potential to attract a lot of conscious and curious consumers.
  • It seems cider really ticks a lot of the current trends boxes, so what is currently holding its market back

    A:
    The main issue I see is consumer education. Today, people in our regions are accustomed to Brettony ciders you’ll find in crêperies or to mainstream UK brands. The awareness for craft ciders is still low, plus, the customer's palate is not yet used to the diversity of flavours craft ciders can bring. It is like with wine, or beer. It is rare to start your beer drinking journey with a craft beer. You'll go first for an easy option, a simple thirst-quenching beer, then you’ll form your palate and learn to appreciate more complex products.

  • What’s your plan to tackle the education issue?

    A:
    Tasting sessions are crucial as well as marketing and communication. Also, I think it makes sense to work closely with other cidreries. Every producer is in the same situation. We  would all benefit from showcasing that cider is a tasty, complex and  interesting beverage for the consumer. I am looking forward to having a critical mass of fellow cider producers to work with. 

  • What’s next for Guillaume?

    A:
    We just produced our first batch of bottles. Actually, as we speak, I just left our co-packing facility, BioFruit SA where we worked with the team there to produce our Sweet Simplon cider. Now, comes the most exciting part, which entails selling our product. We started with selected local shops, bars and restaurants. I don’t plan to get involved with distributors yet and prefer to be directly in contact with the customer, to get their feedback first hand. Then will come the harvest period and the time to start planning our next cuvée of cider series. .


🍎 Business Opportunities: 

  • Want to diversify your wine offering? Cider and wine making pretty much follow the same recipe but are elaborate during different seasons of the year. Take advantage of your cellar’s dormant equipment and start attracting new customers to your cellar. 
  • Want to make a move in food waste reduction? Team up with your local apple producers and create a 100% food waste cider blend by using only apples that aren’t fit for distribution. 
  • Want to raise your customer base awareness? Organize food pairing cider tasting sessions, serve your cider in wine glasses, communicate about your apples terroir and the stories behind your apple producers.


Written by
Emilie Dellecker

Equipped with a Master of Science in Behaviour, Ecology, and Conservation, Emilie’s career was always driven by a desire for positive change. She previously worked at WWF International and Luc Hoffmann Institute, where she was in charge of stakeholder engagement and managed a portfolio of multidisciplinary projects related to sustainable consumption and production involving NGOs, research centres and practitioners.

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  • Access Member Directory
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Until very recently, the odds of me ordering an alcoholic cider at a terrace, even on a hot summer day, were slim to none. I always thought of apple cider as an overly sweet drink fit mostly to accompany a good crepe in Brittany. No more. But recently, I tasted craft cider and a whole new fascinating world opened to me.

Complex savors and acidity, varying sweetness and bubbles. After tasting a few more (yes, they really are good), I realised I was not alone in having discovered this. In fact, craft cider is the next big thing in alcoholic beverages: the global market is expected to reach USD 5.37 billion by 2025, growing 3.1% per year from 2019 to 2025. Driven in particular by millennials who demand authenticity, quality and innovation in alcoholic beverages, the category is well-positioned to replicate the success craft beer has seen in recent years. 

What exactly is “craft” cider? There is no clear definition, according to Pilango, a UK based award winning independent cider retailer. But like craft beer, consumers expect craft cideries to be independent, and produce small batches that reflect a local know-how. Most importantly, craft cider is expected to be made out of high quality (local) ingredients, as opposed to what mainstream ciders have been doing with concentrated apple juice, sugar and water. Reinventing how cider is made and valued is very similar to what happened in smaller breweries in the past 15-20 years. And yet craft cider is quite different from beer, and could even potentially outdo beer on several fronts.

Pommeliers wanted

While there has been a tendency to make and serve cider at the same volume and price as beer, cider is a much more time and labor intensive drink more akin to wine-making.

Start with the terroir. The type of apple or the type of blend is critical in creating a good, distinctive cider. Each blend lends different flavor and structural components, the same way a well-balanced Bordeaux mixes the juicy roundness of Merlot with the structure and intensity of Cabernet grape. Cider’s fermentation process is also technically closer to wine production than that of beer using fruit juice rather than watered-down cereal mash. Like with wine, high-tannin and/or high-acid fruit is key for quality production - all in the right balance.

In a recent interview with the Telegraph, Felix Nash, founder of the Fine Cider company said it well: “We will soon be comfortable enough ordering ciders by apple variety with ‘pommeliers’ able to intrinsic customers on tasting notes and food pairing”. And just like with a grand-cru, prices can skyrock. Forbes, recently covered the release of a $100 bottle, the Rosalita dry rosé, a special cider made with rare cherries from an innovative Michigan cidery..

An eco-friendly drink

The alcohol industry as a whole has a significant negative impact on the environment to be sure. This includes farming practices themselves (use of fertilizer, water use, land use management, transportation) as well as the distillery process (energy use, water use), as well as packaging, refrigeration and transport.

But the craft cider making process is as green as it gets. Compared to other alcoholic beverages, cider making is carbon efficient. Local apples are handpicked, cidreries use wild fermentation techniques, natural cellar temperatures are used to control fermentation. It is also much more efficient in terms of water use, the apple juice being the only ingredient, unlike the water that needs to be added to barley to make beer. Most craft ciders are also produced using foraged and local fruits, sometimes even contributing to its neighborhood food waste reduction. Apple orchards contribute to safeguard biodiversity by providing habitats for a large range of wildlife. The apple trees store carbon more than vineyards and unlike cereals.

Believe it or not, craft cider is also better for your health. While it remains an alcoholic beverage to be consumed in moderation, it is gluten-free and contains lots of vitamin C.

Seems to me those are key ingredients to make craft cider the next big thing.  

Meet the innovators

I sat down with Alexandre Luyet, FoodHack Ambassador in Valais (Switzerland) and serial entrepreneur. I asked him why he decided to launch his cider brand, Guillaume, in 2020 and where the opportunity lies.

  • How did you get the idea of making cider?

    Alexandre:
    It dates back from my first travels in the UK where I discovered cider in pubs. It wasn’t something I was familiar with but after that, the more I tasted it , the more I found it fascinating. A few years later, after having talked to a fellow entrepreneur on his way to produce his own cider, I decided to do some research and it helped me realize all the potential of cider.. For 2 years, we organized blind tasting sessions and experiments to uncover what could be done around this beverage. The initial idea was to create something brute but, when I analyzed the result of our blind test, I realized the market was not there yet and we needed to start with something sweeter and more delicate. 

www.guillaumecider.ch
  • Why did you think it was the right moment to launch a cider brand?

    A:
    Cider is fully part of the local & authentic consumer trend. It resonates with the millennials values which are  more conscious and demanding when it comes to what they eat and drink. Also, the recent explosion of the craft beer market will facilitate consumers' approach to cider. When you have experienced different sorts of beers or wines, you’re more open to discovering other types of drinks, such as craft ciders. Today consumers want something different and unique that fit their lifestyles. Cider is vegan, gluten-free and more environmentally friendly than most mainstream beverages. It can be deeply tight to consumers' origins. it therefore has the potential to attract a lot of conscious and curious consumers.
  • It seems cider really ticks a lot of the current trends boxes, so what is currently holding its market back

    A:
    The main issue I see is consumer education. Today, people in our regions are accustomed to Brettony ciders you’ll find in crêperies or to mainstream UK brands. The awareness for craft ciders is still low, plus, the customer's palate is not yet used to the diversity of flavours craft ciders can bring. It is like with wine, or beer. It is rare to start your beer drinking journey with a craft beer. You'll go first for an easy option, a simple thirst-quenching beer, then you’ll form your palate and learn to appreciate more complex products.

  • What’s your plan to tackle the education issue?

    A:
    Tasting sessions are crucial as well as marketing and communication. Also, I think it makes sense to work closely with other cidreries. Every producer is in the same situation. We  would all benefit from showcasing that cider is a tasty, complex and  interesting beverage for the consumer. I am looking forward to having a critical mass of fellow cider producers to work with. 

  • What’s next for Guillaume?

    A:
    We just produced our first batch of bottles. Actually, as we speak, I just left our co-packing facility, BioFruit SA where we worked with the team there to produce our Sweet Simplon cider. Now, comes the most exciting part, which entails selling our product. We started with selected local shops, bars and restaurants. I don’t plan to get involved with distributors yet and prefer to be directly in contact with the customer, to get their feedback first hand. Then will come the harvest period and the time to start planning our next cuvée of cider series. .


🍎 Business Opportunities: 

  • Want to diversify your wine offering? Cider and wine making pretty much follow the same recipe but are elaborate during different seasons of the year. Take advantage of your cellar’s dormant equipment and start attracting new customers to your cellar. 
  • Want to make a move in food waste reduction? Team up with your local apple producers and create a 100% food waste cider blend by using only apples that aren’t fit for distribution. 
  • Want to raise your customer base awareness? Organize food pairing cider tasting sessions, serve your cider in wine glasses, communicate about your apples terroir and the stories behind your apple producers.


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  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
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Until very recently, the odds of me ordering an alcoholic cider at a terrace, even on a hot summer day, were slim to none. I always thought of apple cider as an overly sweet drink fit mostly to accompany a good crepe in Brittany. No more. But recently, I tasted craft cider and a whole new fascinating world opened to me.

Complex savors and acidity, varying sweetness and bubbles. After tasting a few more (yes, they really are good), I realised I was not alone in having discovered this. In fact, craft cider is the next big thing in alcoholic beverages: the global market is expected to reach USD 5.37 billion by 2025, growing 3.1% per year from 2019 to 2025. Driven in particular by millennials who demand authenticity, quality and innovation in alcoholic beverages, the category is well-positioned to replicate the success craft beer has seen in recent years. 

What exactly is “craft” cider? There is no clear definition, according to Pilango, a UK based award winning independent cider retailer. But like craft beer, consumers expect craft cideries to be independent, and produce small batches that reflect a local know-how. Most importantly, craft cider is expected to be made out of high quality (local) ingredients, as opposed to what mainstream ciders have been doing with concentrated apple juice, sugar and water. Reinventing how cider is made and valued is very similar to what happened in smaller breweries in the past 15-20 years. And yet craft cider is quite different from beer, and could even potentially outdo beer on several fronts.

Pommeliers wanted

While there has been a tendency to make and serve cider at the same volume and price as beer, cider is a much more time and labor intensive drink more akin to wine-making.

Start with the terroir. The type of apple or the type of blend is critical in creating a good, distinctive cider. Each blend lends different flavor and structural components, the same way a well-balanced Bordeaux mixes the juicy roundness of Merlot with the structure and intensity of Cabernet grape. Cider’s fermentation process is also technically closer to wine production than that of beer using fruit juice rather than watered-down cereal mash. Like with wine, high-tannin and/or high-acid fruit is key for quality production - all in the right balance.

In a recent interview with the Telegraph, Felix Nash, founder of the Fine Cider company said it well: “We will soon be comfortable enough ordering ciders by apple variety with ‘pommeliers’ able to intrinsic customers on tasting notes and food pairing”. And just like with a grand-cru, prices can skyrock. Forbes, recently covered the release of a $100 bottle, the Rosalita dry rosé, a special cider made with rare cherries from an innovative Michigan cidery..

An eco-friendly drink

The alcohol industry as a whole has a significant negative impact on the environment to be sure. This includes farming practices themselves (use of fertilizer, water use, land use management, transportation) as well as the distillery process (energy use, water use), as well as packaging, refrigeration and transport.

But the craft cider making process is as green as it gets. Compared to other alcoholic beverages, cider making is carbon efficient. Local apples are handpicked, cidreries use wild fermentation techniques, natural cellar temperatures are used to control fermentation. It is also much more efficient in terms of water use, the apple juice being the only ingredient, unlike the water that needs to be added to barley to make beer. Most craft ciders are also produced using foraged and local fruits, sometimes even contributing to its neighborhood food waste reduction. Apple orchards contribute to safeguard biodiversity by providing habitats for a large range of wildlife. The apple trees store carbon more than vineyards and unlike cereals.

Believe it or not, craft cider is also better for your health. While it remains an alcoholic beverage to be consumed in moderation, it is gluten-free and contains lots of vitamin C.

Seems to me those are key ingredients to make craft cider the next big thing.  

Meet the innovators

I sat down with Alexandre Luyet, FoodHack Ambassador in Valais (Switzerland) and serial entrepreneur. I asked him why he decided to launch his cider brand, Guillaume, in 2020 and where the opportunity lies.

  • How did you get the idea of making cider?

    Alexandre:
    It dates back from my first travels in the UK where I discovered cider in pubs. It wasn’t something I was familiar with but after that, the more I tasted it , the more I found it fascinating. A few years later, after having talked to a fellow entrepreneur on his way to produce his own cider, I decided to do some research and it helped me realize all the potential of cider.. For 2 years, we organized blind tasting sessions and experiments to uncover what could be done around this beverage. The initial idea was to create something brute but, when I analyzed the result of our blind test, I realized the market was not there yet and we needed to start with something sweeter and more delicate. 

www.guillaumecider.ch
  • Why did you think it was the right moment to launch a cider brand?

    A:
    Cider is fully part of the local & authentic consumer trend. It resonates with the millennials values which are  more conscious and demanding when it comes to what they eat and drink. Also, the recent explosion of the craft beer market will facilitate consumers' approach to cider. When you have experienced different sorts of beers or wines, you’re more open to discovering other types of drinks, such as craft ciders. Today consumers want something different and unique that fit their lifestyles. Cider is vegan, gluten-free and more environmentally friendly than most mainstream beverages. It can be deeply tight to consumers' origins. it therefore has the potential to attract a lot of conscious and curious consumers.
  • It seems cider really ticks a lot of the current trends boxes, so what is currently holding its market back

    A:
    The main issue I see is consumer education. Today, people in our regions are accustomed to Brettony ciders you’ll find in crêperies or to mainstream UK brands. The awareness for craft ciders is still low, plus, the customer's palate is not yet used to the diversity of flavours craft ciders can bring. It is like with wine, or beer. It is rare to start your beer drinking journey with a craft beer. You'll go first for an easy option, a simple thirst-quenching beer, then you’ll form your palate and learn to appreciate more complex products.

  • What’s your plan to tackle the education issue?

    A:
    Tasting sessions are crucial as well as marketing and communication. Also, I think it makes sense to work closely with other cidreries. Every producer is in the same situation. We  would all benefit from showcasing that cider is a tasty, complex and  interesting beverage for the consumer. I am looking forward to having a critical mass of fellow cider producers to work with. 

  • What’s next for Guillaume?

    A:
    We just produced our first batch of bottles. Actually, as we speak, I just left our co-packing facility, BioFruit SA where we worked with the team there to produce our Sweet Simplon cider. Now, comes the most exciting part, which entails selling our product. We started with selected local shops, bars and restaurants. I don’t plan to get involved with distributors yet and prefer to be directly in contact with the customer, to get their feedback first hand. Then will come the harvest period and the time to start planning our next cuvée of cider series. .


🍎 Business Opportunities: 

  • Want to diversify your wine offering? Cider and wine making pretty much follow the same recipe but are elaborate during different seasons of the year. Take advantage of your cellar’s dormant equipment and start attracting new customers to your cellar. 
  • Want to make a move in food waste reduction? Team up with your local apple producers and create a 100% food waste cider blend by using only apples that aren’t fit for distribution. 
  • Want to raise your customer base awareness? Organize food pairing cider tasting sessions, serve your cider in wine glasses, communicate about your apples terroir and the stories behind your apple producers.


Until very recently, the odds of me ordering an alcoholic cider at a terrace, even on a hot summer day, were slim to none. I always thought of apple cider as an overly sweet drink fit mostly to accompany a good crepe in Brittany. No more. But recently, I tasted craft cider and a whole new fascinating world opened to me.

Complex savors and acidity, varying sweetness and bubbles. After tasting a few more (yes, they really are good), I realised I was not alone in having discovered this. In fact, craft cider is the next big thing in alcoholic beverages: the global market is expected to reach USD 5.37 billion by 2025, growing 3.1% per year from 2019 to 2025. Driven in particular by millennials who demand authenticity, quality and innovation in alcoholic beverages, the category is well-positioned to replicate the success craft beer has seen in recent years. 

What exactly is “craft” cider? There is no clear definition, according to Pilango, a UK based award winning independent cider retailer. But like craft beer, consumers expect craft cideries to be independent, and produce small batches that reflect a local know-how. Most importantly, craft cider is expected to be made out of high quality (local) ingredients, as opposed to what mainstream ciders have been doing with concentrated apple juice, sugar and water. Reinventing how cider is made and valued is very similar to what happened in smaller breweries in the past 15-20 years. And yet craft cider is quite different from beer, and could even potentially outdo beer on several fronts.

Pommeliers wanted

While there has been a tendency to make and serve cider at the same volume and price as beer, cider is a much more time and labor intensive drink more akin to wine-making.

Start with the terroir. The type of apple or the type of blend is critical in creating a good, distinctive cider. Each blend lends different flavor and structural components, the same way a well-balanced Bordeaux mixes the juicy roundness of Merlot with the structure and intensity of Cabernet grape. Cider’s fermentation process is also technically closer to wine production than that of beer using fruit juice rather than watered-down cereal mash. Like with wine, high-tannin and/or high-acid fruit is key for quality production - all in the right balance.

In a recent interview with the Telegraph, Felix Nash, founder of the Fine Cider company said it well: “We will soon be comfortable enough ordering ciders by apple variety with ‘pommeliers’ able to intrinsic customers on tasting notes and food pairing”. And just like with a grand-cru, prices can skyrock. Forbes, recently covered the release of a $100 bottle, the Rosalita dry rosé, a special cider made with rare cherries from an innovative Michigan cidery..

An eco-friendly drink

The alcohol industry as a whole has a significant negative impact on the environment to be sure. This includes farming practices themselves (use of fertilizer, water use, land use management, transportation) as well as the distillery process (energy use, water use), as well as packaging, refrigeration and transport.

But the craft cider making process is as green as it gets. Compared to other alcoholic beverages, cider making is carbon efficient. Local apples are handpicked, cidreries use wild fermentation techniques, natural cellar temperatures are used to control fermentation. It is also much more efficient in terms of water use, the apple juice being the only ingredient, unlike the water that needs to be added to barley to make beer. Most craft ciders are also produced using foraged and local fruits, sometimes even contributing to its neighborhood food waste reduction. Apple orchards contribute to safeguard biodiversity by providing habitats for a large range of wildlife. The apple trees store carbon more than vineyards and unlike cereals.

Believe it or not, craft cider is also better for your health. While it remains an alcoholic beverage to be consumed in moderation, it is gluten-free and contains lots of vitamin C.

Seems to me those are key ingredients to make craft cider the next big thing.  

Meet the innovators

I sat down with Alexandre Luyet, FoodHack Ambassador in Valais (Switzerland) and serial entrepreneur. I asked him why he decided to launch his cider brand, Guillaume, in 2020 and where the opportunity lies.

  • How did you get the idea of making cider?

    Alexandre:
    It dates back from my first travels in the UK where I discovered cider in pubs. It wasn’t something I was familiar with but after that, the more I tasted it , the more I found it fascinating. A few years later, after having talked to a fellow entrepreneur on his way to produce his own cider, I decided to do some research and it helped me realize all the potential of cider.. For 2 years, we organized blind tasting sessions and experiments to uncover what could be done around this beverage. The initial idea was to create something brute but, when I analyzed the result of our blind test, I realized the market was not there yet and we needed to start with something sweeter and more delicate. 

www.guillaumecider.ch
  • Why did you think it was the right moment to launch a cider brand?

    A:
    Cider is fully part of the local & authentic consumer trend. It resonates with the millennials values which are  more conscious and demanding when it comes to what they eat and drink. Also, the recent explosion of the craft beer market will facilitate consumers' approach to cider. When you have experienced different sorts of beers or wines, you’re more open to discovering other types of drinks, such as craft ciders. Today consumers want something different and unique that fit their lifestyles. Cider is vegan, gluten-free and more environmentally friendly than most mainstream beverages. It can be deeply tight to consumers' origins. it therefore has the potential to attract a lot of conscious and curious consumers.
  • It seems cider really ticks a lot of the current trends boxes, so what is currently holding its market back

    A:
    The main issue I see is consumer education. Today, people in our regions are accustomed to Brettony ciders you’ll find in crêperies or to mainstream UK brands. The awareness for craft ciders is still low, plus, the customer's palate is not yet used to the diversity of flavours craft ciders can bring. It is like with wine, or beer. It is rare to start your beer drinking journey with a craft beer. You'll go first for an easy option, a simple thirst-quenching beer, then you’ll form your palate and learn to appreciate more complex products.

  • What’s your plan to tackle the education issue?

    A:
    Tasting sessions are crucial as well as marketing and communication. Also, I think it makes sense to work closely with other cidreries. Every producer is in the same situation. We  would all benefit from showcasing that cider is a tasty, complex and  interesting beverage for the consumer. I am looking forward to having a critical mass of fellow cider producers to work with. 

  • What’s next for Guillaume?

    A:
    We just produced our first batch of bottles. Actually, as we speak, I just left our co-packing facility, BioFruit SA where we worked with the team there to produce our Sweet Simplon cider. Now, comes the most exciting part, which entails selling our product. We started with selected local shops, bars and restaurants. I don’t plan to get involved with distributors yet and prefer to be directly in contact with the customer, to get their feedback first hand. Then will come the harvest period and the time to start planning our next cuvée of cider series. .


🍎 Business Opportunities: 

  • Want to diversify your wine offering? Cider and wine making pretty much follow the same recipe but are elaborate during different seasons of the year. Take advantage of your cellar’s dormant equipment and start attracting new customers to your cellar. 
  • Want to make a move in food waste reduction? Team up with your local apple producers and create a 100% food waste cider blend by using only apples that aren’t fit for distribution. 
  • Want to raise your customer base awareness? Organize food pairing cider tasting sessions, serve your cider in wine glasses, communicate about your apples terroir and the stories behind your apple producers.