Meet the lupini bean: the humble legume - and the next big superfood - you’ve never heard of

Meet the lupini bean: the humble legume - and the next big superfood - you’ve never heard of

By
Louise Burfitt
August 31, 2021

🌿 What is it?

  • The lupini bean, also known simply as the lupin, is a legume - just like chickpeas and soybeans. Popular as a snack in Italy and conventionally grown for animal feed in Australia, the lupini bean hasn’t traditionally hogged the limelight. 
  • Never heard of them? You’re not alone. Little known outside of southern Europe, lupins are quietly making waves in various food categories. From alternative flours to better-for-you snacks, vegan meats and tempeh, you might soon be hearing quite a lot more from this small but mighty ingredient.

🤔 Tell me more…

  • These beefy yellow beans were allegedly the snack of choice among weary Roman soldiers, and have been a popular pick-me-up in Mediterranean regions basically ever since. They’re usually eaten pickled or as on-the-go-snack like olives.
  • And though they’re not especially well-known outside of certain parts of Europe and South America, things are slowly changing. The lupini bean is readying for its moment in the limelight – and its uses, ranging from lupin bran to protein snacks to plant-based meat and milk, seem almost infinite. 

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • One of the prime drivers of lupin’s recent rise: this unassuming legume is a nutritional powerhouse. Lupins are crammed with fibre and rich in many minerals as well as the amino acid arginine. They’re also protein-packed, with 50% more protein than the same amount of chickpeas. 
  • Lupini beans are cost-efficient to grow, making them a stellar choice for startups who want to produce at scale and save costs at the outset. As well as being an economical crop, they’re better for the climate than, say, soy - lupin crops don’t need much water, have some innate resilience to natural pests and diseases, and even have roots that enrich the soil. Cost-effective and climate-friendly? You can see why the humble lupin is pretty attractive. 
  • And lupin has certain properties that make it a good potential plant-based ingredient: great gelling characteristics, naturally gluten-free, and an ability to take on other flavours well.
The versatile uses of lupin beans

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • Lupini beans have exciting potential applications as a novel ingredient that can be used to increase protein and minerals in food products. Malaysia’s CK Ingredients, for example, have developed their LuPro ingredient that can be added to smoothies and snacks to boost their protein content. Australia’s Lupins for Life sell lupin protein flakes and kibble, while Wide Open Agriculture - also down under - have developed innovative tech to extract protein from sweet lupins for human consumption. 
  • Several companies, big and small, are also looking at lupini beans as alternatives to pea protein and soybeans in plant-based meat and milk substitutes. BUMI and Lupinta have developed a lupin-based tempeh product, while Better Nature sells lupini bean plant-based kebabs, rashers and vegan bites as well. Lupini Milk are using the legume to brew plant-based milk while Nabati Foods in Canada have developed the nation’s first liquid vegan egg alternative.
  • Lupin-based snacks are also becoming a more common sight. The bean’s high protein levels and low-carb qualities make it a good option for better-for-you snacking brands. Lupii sell lupin-based protein bars, for example, while Blooming Foods and The Lupin Company in the UK are innovating with lupini bean crisps. 
  • The legume is also being used to make alternative flours and flakes. Popular with keto diet devotees, it’s also an exciting gluten-free option, as well as being high in fibre and protein. Australia is an established hub for lupin flour, with Golden West Foods, The Protein Bread Company and Lopino to name a few, but other continents are catching on: check out LUP’INGREDIENTS in France and The Lupin Company in the UK. 

👀 Who? (28 companies in this space)

📈 The figures

  • Globally, the lupin protein market is currently valued at $84 million
  • The worldwide market for lupini beans is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% to 2022.
Nabati Foods Eggs

🍳 Case study: Nabati Foods 

  • Canada’s Nabati Foods are looking to lupin for their plant-based liquid egg substitute, launched this summer, and an exciting new innovation in the liquid vegan egg race. 
  • Manufactured using a blend of lupin and pea protein, Nabati’s Plant Eggz are designed to rival the taste, texture and consistency of genuine chicken eggs. 
  • Sold in 355ml bottles, the substitute can be used to make animal-free omelettes, quiches, scrambles, tortillas - and in any cooking situation where you’d normally require a liquid egg. 
  • And they’re sure to appeal to a broad cross-section of consumers, being gluten- and soy-free, kosher, plant-based and free from cholesterol. 
  • Nabati is the first company in Canada to launch a liquid egg replacement on the market, with their Plant Eggz already available in supermarkets in several Canadian states. 
  • The inclusion of lupin beans in the egg alternative’s recipe means that, unlike other similar products, the formulation is soy- and gluten-free, making it suitable for those with allergies. 
Brami Snacks

😋 Case study: BRAMi Snacks 

  • Brooklyn-based BRAMi Snacks are keeping things simple with their pickled lupini bean snacks. 
  • The startup’s Italian Snacking Lupini Beans, currently available in five flavours including Balsamic & Oregano and Hot Calabrian Pepper, boast 80% fewer calories than almonds and are carb-free. 
  • The company also sells a lupini bean dip, similar to hummus, which is rich in protein. 
  • Designed for that afternoon lull when what you really need is an energy-boosting snack, founder Aaron Gatti grew up snacking on Italian lupini beans and launched his lupin-focused brand in 2016. 
  • They’re aimed specifically at health-conscious customers who desire transparency, clean labels and short ingredient lists. 
  • It hasn’t all been smooth sailing: a redesign was a gamble, but ultimately helped to open up further growth with updated serving sizes and improved ingredients. 
  • The company has raised $4.3m to date, with their latest funding round in May resulting in an undisclosed amount. Future flavours and new products are in the pipeline.

👍The good

  • Lupin’s high protein levels make it a fantastic soy-free alternative for use in plant-based proteins. Part of the pushback on some plant-based foods is their nutritional value (or lack thereof) but that’s not a claim that can be levelled at the lupini bean.
  • A substitute for soy is also good news for the climate: lupini beans are good for the soil and can be grown in a variety of climates with little water and pesticide use. 
  • And one of the key advantages of lupini beans is surely their versatility: with such a wide range of potential applications, the legume is attractive to many companies and consumers, including big food brands that see various ways of slotting it into their product lines. 

👎 The bad

  • If you’ve never heard of lupins then you’re not alone - and that lack of knowledge is a stumbling block that new lupin-based products will have to scale. Consumer education - at least outside of the Med - is needed to increase familiarity of this wonder ingredient.
  • Despite being touted as an alternative to soy and peas, lupin is also a potential allergen: in the EU, it is one of 14 ingredients that must be called out on food labels. 
  • While lupini bean farming is already a successful industry as a protein crop in Australia, lupin production in Europe and the US is not yet at the level where a sufficient supply is guaranteed. 

 💡The bottom line

  • From plant-based meat to lupin milk, to flour and protein bars, lupini beans are packed with potential. 
  • With niches in various sectors set to grow, the prospective market is excitingly broad - whether it’s veggies, vegans, those with gluten, soy or egg allergies, or protein junkies, the little lupini bean has large-scale appeal.


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🌿 What is it?

  • The lupini bean, also known simply as the lupin, is a legume - just like chickpeas and soybeans. Popular as a snack in Italy and conventionally grown for animal feed in Australia, the lupini bean hasn’t traditionally hogged the limelight. 
  • Never heard of them? You’re not alone. Little known outside of southern Europe, lupins are quietly making waves in various food categories. From alternative flours to better-for-you snacks, vegan meats and tempeh, you might soon be hearing quite a lot more from this small but mighty ingredient.

🤔 Tell me more…

  • These beefy yellow beans were allegedly the snack of choice among weary Roman soldiers, and have been a popular pick-me-up in Mediterranean regions basically ever since. They’re usually eaten pickled or as on-the-go-snack like olives.
  • And though they’re not especially well-known outside of certain parts of Europe and South America, things are slowly changing. The lupini bean is readying for its moment in the limelight – and its uses, ranging from lupin bran to protein snacks to plant-based meat and milk, seem almost infinite. 

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • One of the prime drivers of lupin’s recent rise: this unassuming legume is a nutritional powerhouse. Lupins are crammed with fibre and rich in many minerals as well as the amino acid arginine. They’re also protein-packed, with 50% more protein than the same amount of chickpeas. 
  • Lupini beans are cost-efficient to grow, making them a stellar choice for startups who want to produce at scale and save costs at the outset. As well as being an economical crop, they’re better for the climate than, say, soy - lupin crops don’t need much water, have some innate resilience to natural pests and diseases, and even have roots that enrich the soil. Cost-effective and climate-friendly? You can see why the humble lupin is pretty attractive. 
  • And lupin has certain properties that make it a good potential plant-based ingredient: great gelling characteristics, naturally gluten-free, and an ability to take on other flavours well.
The versatile uses of lupin beans

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • Lupini beans have exciting potential applications as a novel ingredient that can be used to increase protein and minerals in food products. Malaysia’s CK Ingredients, for example, have developed their LuPro ingredient that can be added to smoothies and snacks to boost their protein content. Australia’s Lupins for Life sell lupin protein flakes and kibble, while Wide Open Agriculture - also down under - have developed innovative tech to extract protein from sweet lupins for human consumption. 
  • Several companies, big and small, are also looking at lupini beans as alternatives to pea protein and soybeans in plant-based meat and milk substitutes. BUMI and Lupinta have developed a lupin-based tempeh product, while Better Nature sells lupini bean plant-based kebabs, rashers and vegan bites as well. Lupini Milk are using the legume to brew plant-based milk while Nabati Foods in Canada have developed the nation’s first liquid vegan egg alternative.
  • Lupin-based snacks are also becoming a more common sight. The bean’s high protein levels and low-carb qualities make it a good option for better-for-you snacking brands. Lupii sell lupin-based protein bars, for example, while Blooming Foods and The Lupin Company in the UK are innovating with lupini bean crisps. 
  • The legume is also being used to make alternative flours and flakes. Popular with keto diet devotees, it’s also an exciting gluten-free option, as well as being high in fibre and protein. Australia is an established hub for lupin flour, with Golden West Foods, The Protein Bread Company and Lopino to name a few, but other continents are catching on: check out LUP’INGREDIENTS in France and The Lupin Company in the UK. 

👀 Who? (28 companies in this space)

📈 The figures

  • Globally, the lupin protein market is currently valued at $84 million
  • The worldwide market for lupini beans is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% to 2022.
Nabati Foods Eggs

🍳 Case study: Nabati Foods 

  • Canada’s Nabati Foods are looking to lupin for their plant-based liquid egg substitute, launched this summer, and an exciting new innovation in the liquid vegan egg race. 
  • Manufactured using a blend of lupin and pea protein, Nabati’s Plant Eggz are designed to rival the taste, texture and consistency of genuine chicken eggs. 
  • Sold in 355ml bottles, the substitute can be used to make animal-free omelettes, quiches, scrambles, tortillas - and in any cooking situation where you’d normally require a liquid egg. 
  • And they’re sure to appeal to a broad cross-section of consumers, being gluten- and soy-free, kosher, plant-based and free from cholesterol. 
  • Nabati is the first company in Canada to launch a liquid egg replacement on the market, with their Plant Eggz already available in supermarkets in several Canadian states. 
  • The inclusion of lupin beans in the egg alternative’s recipe means that, unlike other similar products, the formulation is soy- and gluten-free, making it suitable for those with allergies. 
Brami Snacks

😋 Case study: BRAMi Snacks 

  • Brooklyn-based BRAMi Snacks are keeping things simple with their pickled lupini bean snacks. 
  • The startup’s Italian Snacking Lupini Beans, currently available in five flavours including Balsamic & Oregano and Hot Calabrian Pepper, boast 80% fewer calories than almonds and are carb-free. 
  • The company also sells a lupini bean dip, similar to hummus, which is rich in protein. 
  • Designed for that afternoon lull when what you really need is an energy-boosting snack, founder Aaron Gatti grew up snacking on Italian lupini beans and launched his lupin-focused brand in 2016. 
  • They’re aimed specifically at health-conscious customers who desire transparency, clean labels and short ingredient lists. 
  • It hasn’t all been smooth sailing: a redesign was a gamble, but ultimately helped to open up further growth with updated serving sizes and improved ingredients. 
  • The company has raised $4.3m to date, with their latest funding round in May resulting in an undisclosed amount. Future flavours and new products are in the pipeline.

👍The good

  • Lupin’s high protein levels make it a fantastic soy-free alternative for use in plant-based proteins. Part of the pushback on some plant-based foods is their nutritional value (or lack thereof) but that’s not a claim that can be levelled at the lupini bean.
  • A substitute for soy is also good news for the climate: lupini beans are good for the soil and can be grown in a variety of climates with little water and pesticide use. 
  • And one of the key advantages of lupini beans is surely their versatility: with such a wide range of potential applications, the legume is attractive to many companies and consumers, including big food brands that see various ways of slotting it into their product lines. 

👎 The bad

  • If you’ve never heard of lupins then you’re not alone - and that lack of knowledge is a stumbling block that new lupin-based products will have to scale. Consumer education - at least outside of the Med - is needed to increase familiarity of this wonder ingredient.
  • Despite being touted as an alternative to soy and peas, lupin is also a potential allergen: in the EU, it is one of 14 ingredients that must be called out on food labels. 
  • While lupini bean farming is already a successful industry as a protein crop in Australia, lupin production in Europe and the US is not yet at the level where a sufficient supply is guaranteed. 

 💡The bottom line

  • From plant-based meat to lupin milk, to flour and protein bars, lupini beans are packed with potential. 
  • With niches in various sectors set to grow, the prospective market is excitingly broad - whether it’s veggies, vegans, those with gluten, soy or egg allergies, or protein junkies, the little lupini bean has large-scale appeal.


How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

🌿 What is it?

  • The lupini bean, also known simply as the lupin, is a legume - just like chickpeas and soybeans. Popular as a snack in Italy and conventionally grown for animal feed in Australia, the lupini bean hasn’t traditionally hogged the limelight. 
  • Never heard of them? You’re not alone. Little known outside of southern Europe, lupins are quietly making waves in various food categories. From alternative flours to better-for-you snacks, vegan meats and tempeh, you might soon be hearing quite a lot more from this small but mighty ingredient.

🤔 Tell me more…

  • These beefy yellow beans were allegedly the snack of choice among weary Roman soldiers, and have been a popular pick-me-up in Mediterranean regions basically ever since. They’re usually eaten pickled or as on-the-go-snack like olives.
  • And though they’re not especially well-known outside of certain parts of Europe and South America, things are slowly changing. The lupini bean is readying for its moment in the limelight – and its uses, ranging from lupin bran to protein snacks to plant-based meat and milk, seem almost infinite. 

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • One of the prime drivers of lupin’s recent rise: this unassuming legume is a nutritional powerhouse. Lupins are crammed with fibre and rich in many minerals as well as the amino acid arginine. They’re also protein-packed, with 50% more protein than the same amount of chickpeas. 
  • Lupini beans are cost-efficient to grow, making them a stellar choice for startups who want to produce at scale and save costs at the outset. As well as being an economical crop, they’re better for the climate than, say, soy - lupin crops don’t need much water, have some innate resilience to natural pests and diseases, and even have roots that enrich the soil. Cost-effective and climate-friendly? You can see why the humble lupin is pretty attractive. 
  • And lupin has certain properties that make it a good potential plant-based ingredient: great gelling characteristics, naturally gluten-free, and an ability to take on other flavours well.
The versatile uses of lupin beans

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • Lupini beans have exciting potential applications as a novel ingredient that can be used to increase protein and minerals in food products. Malaysia’s CK Ingredients, for example, have developed their LuPro ingredient that can be added to smoothies and snacks to boost their protein content. Australia’s Lupins for Life sell lupin protein flakes and kibble, while Wide Open Agriculture - also down under - have developed innovative tech to extract protein from sweet lupins for human consumption. 
  • Several companies, big and small, are also looking at lupini beans as alternatives to pea protein and soybeans in plant-based meat and milk substitutes. BUMI and Lupinta have developed a lupin-based tempeh product, while Better Nature sells lupini bean plant-based kebabs, rashers and vegan bites as well. Lupini Milk are using the legume to brew plant-based milk while Nabati Foods in Canada have developed the nation’s first liquid vegan egg alternative.
  • Lupin-based snacks are also becoming a more common sight. The bean’s high protein levels and low-carb qualities make it a good option for better-for-you snacking brands. Lupii sell lupin-based protein bars, for example, while Blooming Foods and The Lupin Company in the UK are innovating with lupini bean crisps. 
  • The legume is also being used to make alternative flours and flakes. Popular with keto diet devotees, it’s also an exciting gluten-free option, as well as being high in fibre and protein. Australia is an established hub for lupin flour, with Golden West Foods, The Protein Bread Company and Lopino to name a few, but other continents are catching on: check out LUP’INGREDIENTS in France and The Lupin Company in the UK. 

👀 Who? (28 companies in this space)

📈 The figures

  • Globally, the lupin protein market is currently valued at $84 million
  • The worldwide market for lupini beans is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% to 2022.
Nabati Foods Eggs

🍳 Case study: Nabati Foods 

  • Canada’s Nabati Foods are looking to lupin for their plant-based liquid egg substitute, launched this summer, and an exciting new innovation in the liquid vegan egg race. 
  • Manufactured using a blend of lupin and pea protein, Nabati’s Plant Eggz are designed to rival the taste, texture and consistency of genuine chicken eggs. 
  • Sold in 355ml bottles, the substitute can be used to make animal-free omelettes, quiches, scrambles, tortillas - and in any cooking situation where you’d normally require a liquid egg. 
  • And they’re sure to appeal to a broad cross-section of consumers, being gluten- and soy-free, kosher, plant-based and free from cholesterol. 
  • Nabati is the first company in Canada to launch a liquid egg replacement on the market, with their Plant Eggz already available in supermarkets in several Canadian states. 
  • The inclusion of lupin beans in the egg alternative’s recipe means that, unlike other similar products, the formulation is soy- and gluten-free, making it suitable for those with allergies. 
Brami Snacks

😋 Case study: BRAMi Snacks 

  • Brooklyn-based BRAMi Snacks are keeping things simple with their pickled lupini bean snacks. 
  • The startup’s Italian Snacking Lupini Beans, currently available in five flavours including Balsamic & Oregano and Hot Calabrian Pepper, boast 80% fewer calories than almonds and are carb-free. 
  • The company also sells a lupini bean dip, similar to hummus, which is rich in protein. 
  • Designed for that afternoon lull when what you really need is an energy-boosting snack, founder Aaron Gatti grew up snacking on Italian lupini beans and launched his lupin-focused brand in 2016. 
  • They’re aimed specifically at health-conscious customers who desire transparency, clean labels and short ingredient lists. 
  • It hasn’t all been smooth sailing: a redesign was a gamble, but ultimately helped to open up further growth with updated serving sizes and improved ingredients. 
  • The company has raised $4.3m to date, with their latest funding round in May resulting in an undisclosed amount. Future flavours and new products are in the pipeline.

👍The good

  • Lupin’s high protein levels make it a fantastic soy-free alternative for use in plant-based proteins. Part of the pushback on some plant-based foods is their nutritional value (or lack thereof) but that’s not a claim that can be levelled at the lupini bean.
  • A substitute for soy is also good news for the climate: lupini beans are good for the soil and can be grown in a variety of climates with little water and pesticide use. 
  • And one of the key advantages of lupini beans is surely their versatility: with such a wide range of potential applications, the legume is attractive to many companies and consumers, including big food brands that see various ways of slotting it into their product lines. 

👎 The bad

  • If you’ve never heard of lupins then you’re not alone - and that lack of knowledge is a stumbling block that new lupin-based products will have to scale. Consumer education - at least outside of the Med - is needed to increase familiarity of this wonder ingredient.
  • Despite being touted as an alternative to soy and peas, lupin is also a potential allergen: in the EU, it is one of 14 ingredients that must be called out on food labels. 
  • While lupini bean farming is already a successful industry as a protein crop in Australia, lupin production in Europe and the US is not yet at the level where a sufficient supply is guaranteed. 

 💡The bottom line

  • From plant-based meat to lupin milk, to flour and protein bars, lupini beans are packed with potential. 
  • With niches in various sectors set to grow, the prospective market is excitingly broad - whether it’s veggies, vegans, those with gluten, soy or egg allergies, or protein junkies, the little lupini bean has large-scale appeal.


How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

🌿 What is it?

  • The lupini bean, also known simply as the lupin, is a legume - just like chickpeas and soybeans. Popular as a snack in Italy and conventionally grown for animal feed in Australia, the lupini bean hasn’t traditionally hogged the limelight. 
  • Never heard of them? You’re not alone. Little known outside of southern Europe, lupins are quietly making waves in various food categories. From alternative flours to better-for-you snacks, vegan meats and tempeh, you might soon be hearing quite a lot more from this small but mighty ingredient.

🤔 Tell me more…

  • These beefy yellow beans were allegedly the snack of choice among weary Roman soldiers, and have been a popular pick-me-up in Mediterranean regions basically ever since. They’re usually eaten pickled or as on-the-go-snack like olives.
  • And though they’re not especially well-known outside of certain parts of Europe and South America, things are slowly changing. The lupini bean is readying for its moment in the limelight – and its uses, ranging from lupin bran to protein snacks to plant-based meat and milk, seem almost infinite. 

🤷‍♂️ Why?

  • One of the prime drivers of lupin’s recent rise: this unassuming legume is a nutritional powerhouse. Lupins are crammed with fibre and rich in many minerals as well as the amino acid arginine. They’re also protein-packed, with 50% more protein than the same amount of chickpeas. 
  • Lupini beans are cost-efficient to grow, making them a stellar choice for startups who want to produce at scale and save costs at the outset. As well as being an economical crop, they’re better for the climate than, say, soy - lupin crops don’t need much water, have some innate resilience to natural pests and diseases, and even have roots that enrich the soil. Cost-effective and climate-friendly? You can see why the humble lupin is pretty attractive. 
  • And lupin has certain properties that make it a good potential plant-based ingredient: great gelling characteristics, naturally gluten-free, and an ability to take on other flavours well.
The versatile uses of lupin beans

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • Lupini beans have exciting potential applications as a novel ingredient that can be used to increase protein and minerals in food products. Malaysia’s CK Ingredients, for example, have developed their LuPro ingredient that can be added to smoothies and snacks to boost their protein content. Australia’s Lupins for Life sell lupin protein flakes and kibble, while Wide Open Agriculture - also down under - have developed innovative tech to extract protein from sweet lupins for human consumption. 
  • Several companies, big and small, are also looking at lupini beans as alternatives to pea protein and soybeans in plant-based meat and milk substitutes. BUMI and Lupinta have developed a lupin-based tempeh product, while Better Nature sells lupini bean plant-based kebabs, rashers and vegan bites as well. Lupini Milk are using the legume to brew plant-based milk while Nabati Foods in Canada have developed the nation’s first liquid vegan egg alternative.
  • Lupin-based snacks are also becoming a more common sight. The bean’s high protein levels and low-carb qualities make it a good option for better-for-you snacking brands. Lupii sell lupin-based protein bars, for example, while Blooming Foods and The Lupin Company in the UK are innovating with lupini bean crisps. 
  • The legume is also being used to make alternative flours and flakes. Popular with keto diet devotees, it’s also an exciting gluten-free option, as well as being high in fibre and protein. Australia is an established hub for lupin flour, with Golden West Foods, The Protein Bread Company and Lopino to name a few, but other continents are catching on: check out LUP’INGREDIENTS in France and The Lupin Company in the UK. 

👀 Who? (28 companies in this space)

📈 The figures

  • Globally, the lupin protein market is currently valued at $84 million
  • The worldwide market for lupini beans is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% to 2022.
Nabati Foods Eggs

🍳 Case study: Nabati Foods 

  • Canada’s Nabati Foods are looking to lupin for their plant-based liquid egg substitute, launched this summer, and an exciting new innovation in the liquid vegan egg race. 
  • Manufactured using a blend of lupin and pea protein, Nabati’s Plant Eggz are designed to rival the taste, texture and consistency of genuine chicken eggs. 
  • Sold in 355ml bottles, the substitute can be used to make animal-free omelettes, quiches, scrambles, tortillas - and in any cooking situation where you’d normally require a liquid egg. 
  • And they’re sure to appeal to a broad cross-section of consumers, being gluten- and soy-free, kosher, plant-based and free from cholesterol. 
  • Nabati is the first company in Canada to launch a liquid egg replacement on the market, with their Plant Eggz already available in supermarkets in several Canadian states. 
  • The inclusion of lupin beans in the egg alternative’s recipe means that, unlike other similar products, the formulation is soy- and gluten-free, making it suitable for those with allergies. 
Brami Snacks

😋 Case study: BRAMi Snacks 

  • Brooklyn-based BRAMi Snacks are keeping things simple with their pickled lupini bean snacks. 
  • The startup’s Italian Snacking Lupini Beans, currently available in five flavours including Balsamic & Oregano and Hot Calabrian Pepper, boast 80% fewer calories than almonds and are carb-free. 
  • The company also sells a lupini bean dip, similar to hummus, which is rich in protein. 
  • Designed for that afternoon lull when what you really need is an energy-boosting snack, founder Aaron Gatti grew up snacking on Italian lupini beans and launched his lupin-focused brand in 2016. 
  • They’re aimed specifically at health-conscious customers who desire transparency, clean labels and short ingredient lists. 
  • It hasn’t all been smooth sailing: a redesign was a gamble, but ultimately helped to open up further growth with updated serving sizes and improved ingredients. 
  • The company has raised $4.3m to date, with their latest funding round in May resulting in an undisclosed amount. Future flavours and new products are in the pipeline.

👍The good

  • Lupin’s high protein levels make it a fantastic soy-free alternative for use in plant-based proteins. Part of the pushback on some plant-based foods is their nutritional value (or lack thereof) but that’s not a claim that can be levelled at the lupini bean.
  • A substitute for soy is also good news for the climate: lupini beans are good for the soil and can be grown in a variety of climates with little water and pesticide use. 
  • And one of the key advantages of lupini beans is surely their versatility: with such a wide range of potential applications, the legume is attractive to many companies and consumers, including big food brands that see various ways of slotting it into their product lines. 

👎 The bad

  • If you’ve never heard of lupins then you’re not alone - and that lack of knowledge is a stumbling block that new lupin-based products will have to scale. Consumer education - at least outside of the Med - is needed to increase familiarity of this wonder ingredient.
  • Despite being touted as an alternative to soy and peas, lupin is also a potential allergen: in the EU, it is one of 14 ingredients that must be called out on food labels. 
  • While lupini bean farming is already a successful industry as a protein crop in Australia, lupin production in Europe and the US is not yet at the level where a sufficient supply is guaranteed. 

 💡The bottom line

  • From plant-based meat to lupin milk, to flour and protein bars, lupini beans are packed with potential. 
  • With niches in various sectors set to grow, the prospective market is excitingly broad - whether it’s veggies, vegans, those with gluten, soy or egg allergies, or protein junkies, the little lupini bean has large-scale appeal.


How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

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Game on: the 21 brands after the growing esports nutrition industry for gamers
New Energy: the 37 companies creating better-for-you energy drinks
Flour power: the rise of substitute alternatives to traditional wheat flour
Meet the lupini bean: the humble legume - and the next big superfood - you’ve never heard of
Animal Free Cheese: the 90+ brands on quest to make great tasting cheese, cow-free
New kids on the block: the 40+ brands making healthier choices for babies and children
Vegan beef jerky and cell-cultured seafood: Africa’s FoodTech scene is heating up
The fourth wave of craft coffee is coming: are you ready for a revamped cup of jo?