Cracked it: the 65+ brands hatching new innovations in plant-based eggs

Cracked it: the 65+ brands hatching new innovations in plant-based eggs

By
Louise Burfitt
January 11, 2022

🐔 What is it?

  • Plant-based eggs are nothing new, and keen readers will note we’ve written plenty about the trend before.
  • But in light of Veganuary and a new year of innovations to come, we thought we’d take you on a whistlestop scramble of the latest developments in the egg-free space…

🤔 Tell me more…

  • As you might already know, making alternative eggs - using plants, proteins or otherwise - isn’t exactly something that comes easy. 
  • And customers have high expectations of their plant-based substitutes, following on from the success of meat mimickers like the Impossible Burger. People want eggs they can fry, poach, scramble and whisk up well in an everyday bake. And if that’s not already asking for a lot, customers also want them to have the same health benefits and texture of normal eggs too…
  • Yet despite the difficulties involved, the sector is booming. In 2020, vegan eggs were the fastest-growing segment in the plant-based market, 
  • From hardboiled alt eggs to yolk-only substitutes, plant-based breakfast burritos and vegan omelettes, let’s dive into the softly whipped peaks of the burgeoning plant-based egg market.

🤷 Why?

  • For many eggs are a staple food - appropriate for breakfast, a quick lunch or to be whisked up into a birthday cake. Yet this everyday food comes with a cost: 9 in 10 of the 1 trillion eggs consumed annually around the globe are the product of factory farming. More and more people are willing to try out alternatives for ethical or environmental reasons: a survey by the Vegan Society found that 98% of non-vegans would happily sample a plant-based egg. 
  • The first plant-based egg brands paved the way for today’s new raft of startups: Eat Just, who make JUST Egg, was founded back in 2011 and showed that there was real demand for plant-based liquid egg alternatives. This helped build consumer acceptance for egg alternatives during the 2010s, leading the way for ingredients companies and brands working on more niche plant-based egg substitutes like hard boiled versions and egg white alternatives.
  • The growing egg alternative market is also a sign that it’s a space where startups can stretch out and make their mark - something of an untapped market compared to meat-free burgers and plant milks. Analysis by the EIT found that there’s still an insufficient number of egg substitutes to meet demand in Europe, despite recent growth in the sector. That’s changing, with a few companies attracting significant funding and more versatile applications arising.. 

📈 The figures

  • Worldwide, the egg replacement market is on the up and up: it was valued at 1.4 billion in 2021 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6% until 2026.

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • The boom in egg alternatives means there’s suddenly something for almost everyone: home bakers, breakfast lovers, anyone who loves a pot of mayo with their (vegan) burger. 
  • Many of the egg alternatives that gained popularity in the last decade were liquid-only substitutes; easier for manufacturers to perfect, and potentially easier for consumers to accept than a fully-fledged egg with a shell, white and yolk. This is still the biggest sub-segment in the alt-egg world, with lots of new startups on the scene (check out the full list below!). 
  • Now there’s also companies working on ‘all-purpose’ eggs that can be used in all of the same ways as the chicken-laid variety. Zero Egg, based in Israel, is doing just that, honing in on applications for the food industry to make plant-based eggs a viable alternative on a broader scale. 
  • Other ‘whole egg’ replacement brands include Germany’s Bettr Egg, Swiss EggField and Singapore’s OnlyEg by Float Foods. Then there’s those mimicking hard boiled eggs: WunderEggs and Osomoegg.
  • Some companies, meanwhile, are focusing on the B2B egg ingredients market for the bakery, foodservice and CPG sectors - a segment that’s growing at a CAGR of 6.2% - making it attractive to both startup founders and investors. EVO Foods in India, an emerging market for plant-based eggs, is one company targeting foodservice - joined by Brazil’s N.Ovo and Japan’s Next Egg.
  • Many brands across all of these segments are working to reduce their ingredients lists too. Following the backlash to long ingredients lists on vegan meats, plant-based egg producers are taking note. Crackd, in the UK, is one such brand - the startup’s liquid egg alternative now has just 13 ingredients. It may sound like a lot - but it’s really not when it comes to plant-based eggs. SavorEat, who make an egg alternative for the ingredients industry called Egg’n’up, are opting for natural binding agents to boost their clean label credentials. 
  • Liquid egg white alternatives for baking are also a growing niche. Home bakers, vegan or flexi, are keen to try out plant-based versions of meringue and baked goods - and bakery manufacturers want to offer authentic vegan substitutes to their customers too. OGGS is one of the most well-known liquid egg white alternatives, but other contenders in this space include Yumgo Blanc and InnovoPro
  • And in a key sign the trend for alt eggs is going mainstream, big names are getting involved too. Migros late last year announced the launch of their hard boiled plant based eggs, Nestlé’s Garden Gourmet range has a plant-based omelette mix already for sale in Europe, and JUST Eggs have popped up in well-known outlets like Canada’s Tim Horton’s. 

👀 Who? (65 companies in this space)

🥚  Case study: WunderEggs by Crafty Counter

  • WunderEggs, based out of Austin, Texas, wants you to have your eggs and eat them too. 
  • Catering to consumers who care about the planet and healthy eating, the dippy egg substitute has been dreamt up by plant-based brand Crafty Counter, best known for their lentil veggie burgers and bites.
  • WunderEggs are the first whole food plant-based hard boiled eggs that offer similar nutritional benefits to conventional eggs. Made from almonds and cashews, coconut milk, turmeric, probiotics and black salt, the product is also free from soy and gluten. 
  • Like conventional hard boiled eggs, WunderEggs have both a white and a yolk. Thanks to proprietary processing technology, they also have a super long shelf life - up to 120 days!
  • The eggs are apparently an industry first, as the only ready-to-eat hard boiled egg substitute suitable for vegans. 
  • And as of autumn 2021, the company’s eggy invention is now patent-pending
  • As soon as that patent is granted, Crafty Counter plans to release its plant-based vegan boiled egg to market.

🍳  Case study: YoEgg

  • Israel’s YoEgg is reimagining everyone’s favourite egg dishes with its entirely plant-based full egg substitute. Fried, egged, poached or boiled, the brand has many more versions in the works too. 
  • YoEgg! Co-founder and CEO Eran Groner shared that "The most important thing (for plant-based eggs) is to get the right experience and a favorable taste profile. These two are inseparable"
  • YoEgg state that their goal clearly is: to become the largest and most sustainable egg manufacturer in the world, no chickens necessary. 
  • The fully vegan egg substitute is made from a proprietary blend of vegetable proteins, oil and algae - and it’s free from cholesterol too and carries no risk of egg-associated illnesses like salmonella.
  • Made up of a faux white and a yolk, both are now patent-pending. 
  • Currently only available in Israel at select restaurants, the brand has big plans to launch further afield in 2022. 
  • And with the first reviews coming in, the signs are good – described by some of the initial tasters as ‘one of the best plant-based alternatives ever’.

👍 The good

  • The rise in egg replacers will not only benefit vegans: many firms are targeting the large flexitarian market, with most products - except those genetically identical to chicken eggs - also suitable for those with an egg allergy. 
  • Egg replacements have health benefits, just like normal eggs, with producers eager to make the nutritional benefits of their alternative products apparent. And by carefully selecting what they include in a product, alt-egg brands can sell substitutes that are high in protein but free from cholesterol, with all the vitamins and nutrients found in real eggs. 
  • In the bakery and confectionery segments, it’s clear most consumers don’t care whether they’re eating real eggs or not - as long as their food tastes good. So the wave of new, authentic-tasting egg replacers should pave the way for more vegan baked goods and treats.
  • The wealth of variety when it comes to substitutes for real eggs is a boon for those who follow a plant-based diet and those who don’t alike. No longer constrained to liquid egg alternatives, the new tranche of whole eggs, vegan scrambles, ready-to-eat products and more are likely to lure in new customers. 

👎 The bad

  • While millennials and Gen Z-ers are driving demand for egg alternatives, brands may have a harder time convincing older consumers to accept egg substitutes. 
  • Alt-egg startups also need to create ‘clean label’ products to satisfy consumer demands around health and nutrition, while still keeping their products authentic and cost-effective.
  • Despite many advances in the category, analysis by ProVeg found that no chicken egg alternative currently available can be substituted like for like in baking without modifications. That will need to change if home bakers are to be lured away from the siren call of actual eggs.
  • The vast majority of plant-based eggs are still more expensive than conventional chicken’s eggs. While the vegan substitutes aren’t subject to the same seasonal pricing fluctuations as conventional eggs, it’s yet to be determined whether consumers will be happy to pay more for ethical substitutes. 

 💡The bottom line

  • Just like the plant-based milk and meat markets before it, chicken-free eggs are proving more and more popular for reasons of ethics, environment and more.
  • Given the growth in the market, consumers also now have more options to choose from. While that’s partly a good development, it means more competition for the producers of plant-based eggs: shoppers will quickly head to the most lifelike substitutes, so manufacturers need to put in the effort to get their products just right. 
  • The scramble by investors to fund these startups is proof of the sector’s promise, but brands will have to make their substitutes as chicken-like as possible to win over lifelong egg lovers.

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🐔 What is it?

  • Plant-based eggs are nothing new, and keen readers will note we’ve written plenty about the trend before.
  • But in light of Veganuary and a new year of innovations to come, we thought we’d take you on a whistlestop scramble of the latest developments in the egg-free space…

🤔 Tell me more…

  • As you might already know, making alternative eggs - using plants, proteins or otherwise - isn’t exactly something that comes easy. 
  • And customers have high expectations of their plant-based substitutes, following on from the success of meat mimickers like the Impossible Burger. People want eggs they can fry, poach, scramble and whisk up well in an everyday bake. And if that’s not already asking for a lot, customers also want them to have the same health benefits and texture of normal eggs too…
  • Yet despite the difficulties involved, the sector is booming. In 2020, vegan eggs were the fastest-growing segment in the plant-based market, 
  • From hardboiled alt eggs to yolk-only substitutes, plant-based breakfast burritos and vegan omelettes, let’s dive into the softly whipped peaks of the burgeoning plant-based egg market.

🤷 Why?

  • For many eggs are a staple food - appropriate for breakfast, a quick lunch or to be whisked up into a birthday cake. Yet this everyday food comes with a cost: 9 in 10 of the 1 trillion eggs consumed annually around the globe are the product of factory farming. More and more people are willing to try out alternatives for ethical or environmental reasons: a survey by the Vegan Society found that 98% of non-vegans would happily sample a plant-based egg. 
  • The first plant-based egg brands paved the way for today’s new raft of startups: Eat Just, who make JUST Egg, was founded back in 2011 and showed that there was real demand for plant-based liquid egg alternatives. This helped build consumer acceptance for egg alternatives during the 2010s, leading the way for ingredients companies and brands working on more niche plant-based egg substitutes like hard boiled versions and egg white alternatives.
  • The growing egg alternative market is also a sign that it’s a space where startups can stretch out and make their mark - something of an untapped market compared to meat-free burgers and plant milks. Analysis by the EIT found that there’s still an insufficient number of egg substitutes to meet demand in Europe, despite recent growth in the sector. That’s changing, with a few companies attracting significant funding and more versatile applications arising.. 

📈 The figures

  • Worldwide, the egg replacement market is on the up and up: it was valued at 1.4 billion in 2021 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6% until 2026.

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • The boom in egg alternatives means there’s suddenly something for almost everyone: home bakers, breakfast lovers, anyone who loves a pot of mayo with their (vegan) burger. 
  • Many of the egg alternatives that gained popularity in the last decade were liquid-only substitutes; easier for manufacturers to perfect, and potentially easier for consumers to accept than a fully-fledged egg with a shell, white and yolk. This is still the biggest sub-segment in the alt-egg world, with lots of new startups on the scene (check out the full list below!). 
  • Now there’s also companies working on ‘all-purpose’ eggs that can be used in all of the same ways as the chicken-laid variety. Zero Egg, based in Israel, is doing just that, honing in on applications for the food industry to make plant-based eggs a viable alternative on a broader scale. 
  • Other ‘whole egg’ replacement brands include Germany’s Bettr Egg, Swiss EggField and Singapore’s OnlyEg by Float Foods. Then there’s those mimicking hard boiled eggs: WunderEggs and Osomoegg.
  • Some companies, meanwhile, are focusing on the B2B egg ingredients market for the bakery, foodservice and CPG sectors - a segment that’s growing at a CAGR of 6.2% - making it attractive to both startup founders and investors. EVO Foods in India, an emerging market for plant-based eggs, is one company targeting foodservice - joined by Brazil’s N.Ovo and Japan’s Next Egg.
  • Many brands across all of these segments are working to reduce their ingredients lists too. Following the backlash to long ingredients lists on vegan meats, plant-based egg producers are taking note. Crackd, in the UK, is one such brand - the startup’s liquid egg alternative now has just 13 ingredients. It may sound like a lot - but it’s really not when it comes to plant-based eggs. SavorEat, who make an egg alternative for the ingredients industry called Egg’n’up, are opting for natural binding agents to boost their clean label credentials. 
  • Liquid egg white alternatives for baking are also a growing niche. Home bakers, vegan or flexi, are keen to try out plant-based versions of meringue and baked goods - and bakery manufacturers want to offer authentic vegan substitutes to their customers too. OGGS is one of the most well-known liquid egg white alternatives, but other contenders in this space include Yumgo Blanc and InnovoPro
  • And in a key sign the trend for alt eggs is going mainstream, big names are getting involved too. Migros late last year announced the launch of their hard boiled plant based eggs, Nestlé’s Garden Gourmet range has a plant-based omelette mix already for sale in Europe, and JUST Eggs have popped up in well-known outlets like Canada’s Tim Horton’s. 

👀 Who? (65 companies in this space)

🥚  Case study: WunderEggs by Crafty Counter

  • WunderEggs, based out of Austin, Texas, wants you to have your eggs and eat them too. 
  • Catering to consumers who care about the planet and healthy eating, the dippy egg substitute has been dreamt up by plant-based brand Crafty Counter, best known for their lentil veggie burgers and bites.
  • WunderEggs are the first whole food plant-based hard boiled eggs that offer similar nutritional benefits to conventional eggs. Made from almonds and cashews, coconut milk, turmeric, probiotics and black salt, the product is also free from soy and gluten. 
  • Like conventional hard boiled eggs, WunderEggs have both a white and a yolk. Thanks to proprietary processing technology, they also have a super long shelf life - up to 120 days!
  • The eggs are apparently an industry first, as the only ready-to-eat hard boiled egg substitute suitable for vegans. 
  • And as of autumn 2021, the company’s eggy invention is now patent-pending
  • As soon as that patent is granted, Crafty Counter plans to release its plant-based vegan boiled egg to market.

🍳  Case study: YoEgg

  • Israel’s YoEgg is reimagining everyone’s favourite egg dishes with its entirely plant-based full egg substitute. Fried, egged, poached or boiled, the brand has many more versions in the works too. 
  • YoEgg! Co-founder and CEO Eran Groner shared that "The most important thing (for plant-based eggs) is to get the right experience and a favorable taste profile. These two are inseparable"
  • YoEgg state that their goal clearly is: to become the largest and most sustainable egg manufacturer in the world, no chickens necessary. 
  • The fully vegan egg substitute is made from a proprietary blend of vegetable proteins, oil and algae - and it’s free from cholesterol too and carries no risk of egg-associated illnesses like salmonella.
  • Made up of a faux white and a yolk, both are now patent-pending. 
  • Currently only available in Israel at select restaurants, the brand has big plans to launch further afield in 2022. 
  • And with the first reviews coming in, the signs are good – described by some of the initial tasters as ‘one of the best plant-based alternatives ever’.

👍 The good

  • The rise in egg replacers will not only benefit vegans: many firms are targeting the large flexitarian market, with most products - except those genetically identical to chicken eggs - also suitable for those with an egg allergy. 
  • Egg replacements have health benefits, just like normal eggs, with producers eager to make the nutritional benefits of their alternative products apparent. And by carefully selecting what they include in a product, alt-egg brands can sell substitutes that are high in protein but free from cholesterol, with all the vitamins and nutrients found in real eggs. 
  • In the bakery and confectionery segments, it’s clear most consumers don’t care whether they’re eating real eggs or not - as long as their food tastes good. So the wave of new, authentic-tasting egg replacers should pave the way for more vegan baked goods and treats.
  • The wealth of variety when it comes to substitutes for real eggs is a boon for those who follow a plant-based diet and those who don’t alike. No longer constrained to liquid egg alternatives, the new tranche of whole eggs, vegan scrambles, ready-to-eat products and more are likely to lure in new customers. 

👎 The bad

  • While millennials and Gen Z-ers are driving demand for egg alternatives, brands may have a harder time convincing older consumers to accept egg substitutes. 
  • Alt-egg startups also need to create ‘clean label’ products to satisfy consumer demands around health and nutrition, while still keeping their products authentic and cost-effective.
  • Despite many advances in the category, analysis by ProVeg found that no chicken egg alternative currently available can be substituted like for like in baking without modifications. That will need to change if home bakers are to be lured away from the siren call of actual eggs.
  • The vast majority of plant-based eggs are still more expensive than conventional chicken’s eggs. While the vegan substitutes aren’t subject to the same seasonal pricing fluctuations as conventional eggs, it’s yet to be determined whether consumers will be happy to pay more for ethical substitutes. 

 💡The bottom line

  • Just like the plant-based milk and meat markets before it, chicken-free eggs are proving more and more popular for reasons of ethics, environment and more.
  • Given the growth in the market, consumers also now have more options to choose from. While that’s partly a good development, it means more competition for the producers of plant-based eggs: shoppers will quickly head to the most lifelike substitutes, so manufacturers need to put in the effort to get their products just right. 
  • The scramble by investors to fund these startups is proof of the sector’s promise, but brands will have to make their substitutes as chicken-like as possible to win over lifelong egg lovers.

How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

🐔 What is it?

  • Plant-based eggs are nothing new, and keen readers will note we’ve written plenty about the trend before.
  • But in light of Veganuary and a new year of innovations to come, we thought we’d take you on a whistlestop scramble of the latest developments in the egg-free space…

🤔 Tell me more…

  • As you might already know, making alternative eggs - using plants, proteins or otherwise - isn’t exactly something that comes easy. 
  • And customers have high expectations of their plant-based substitutes, following on from the success of meat mimickers like the Impossible Burger. People want eggs they can fry, poach, scramble and whisk up well in an everyday bake. And if that’s not already asking for a lot, customers also want them to have the same health benefits and texture of normal eggs too…
  • Yet despite the difficulties involved, the sector is booming. In 2020, vegan eggs were the fastest-growing segment in the plant-based market, 
  • From hardboiled alt eggs to yolk-only substitutes, plant-based breakfast burritos and vegan omelettes, let’s dive into the softly whipped peaks of the burgeoning plant-based egg market.

🤷 Why?

  • For many eggs are a staple food - appropriate for breakfast, a quick lunch or to be whisked up into a birthday cake. Yet this everyday food comes with a cost: 9 in 10 of the 1 trillion eggs consumed annually around the globe are the product of factory farming. More and more people are willing to try out alternatives for ethical or environmental reasons: a survey by the Vegan Society found that 98% of non-vegans would happily sample a plant-based egg. 
  • The first plant-based egg brands paved the way for today’s new raft of startups: Eat Just, who make JUST Egg, was founded back in 2011 and showed that there was real demand for plant-based liquid egg alternatives. This helped build consumer acceptance for egg alternatives during the 2010s, leading the way for ingredients companies and brands working on more niche plant-based egg substitutes like hard boiled versions and egg white alternatives.
  • The growing egg alternative market is also a sign that it’s a space where startups can stretch out and make their mark - something of an untapped market compared to meat-free burgers and plant milks. Analysis by the EIT found that there’s still an insufficient number of egg substitutes to meet demand in Europe, despite recent growth in the sector. That’s changing, with a few companies attracting significant funding and more versatile applications arising.. 

📈 The figures

  • Worldwide, the egg replacement market is on the up and up: it was valued at 1.4 billion in 2021 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6% until 2026.

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • The boom in egg alternatives means there’s suddenly something for almost everyone: home bakers, breakfast lovers, anyone who loves a pot of mayo with their (vegan) burger. 
  • Many of the egg alternatives that gained popularity in the last decade were liquid-only substitutes; easier for manufacturers to perfect, and potentially easier for consumers to accept than a fully-fledged egg with a shell, white and yolk. This is still the biggest sub-segment in the alt-egg world, with lots of new startups on the scene (check out the full list below!). 
  • Now there’s also companies working on ‘all-purpose’ eggs that can be used in all of the same ways as the chicken-laid variety. Zero Egg, based in Israel, is doing just that, honing in on applications for the food industry to make plant-based eggs a viable alternative on a broader scale. 
  • Other ‘whole egg’ replacement brands include Germany’s Bettr Egg, Swiss EggField and Singapore’s OnlyEg by Float Foods. Then there’s those mimicking hard boiled eggs: WunderEggs and Osomoegg.
  • Some companies, meanwhile, are focusing on the B2B egg ingredients market for the bakery, foodservice and CPG sectors - a segment that’s growing at a CAGR of 6.2% - making it attractive to both startup founders and investors. EVO Foods in India, an emerging market for plant-based eggs, is one company targeting foodservice - joined by Brazil’s N.Ovo and Japan’s Next Egg.
  • Many brands across all of these segments are working to reduce their ingredients lists too. Following the backlash to long ingredients lists on vegan meats, plant-based egg producers are taking note. Crackd, in the UK, is one such brand - the startup’s liquid egg alternative now has just 13 ingredients. It may sound like a lot - but it’s really not when it comes to plant-based eggs. SavorEat, who make an egg alternative for the ingredients industry called Egg’n’up, are opting for natural binding agents to boost their clean label credentials. 
  • Liquid egg white alternatives for baking are also a growing niche. Home bakers, vegan or flexi, are keen to try out plant-based versions of meringue and baked goods - and bakery manufacturers want to offer authentic vegan substitutes to their customers too. OGGS is one of the most well-known liquid egg white alternatives, but other contenders in this space include Yumgo Blanc and InnovoPro
  • And in a key sign the trend for alt eggs is going mainstream, big names are getting involved too. Migros late last year announced the launch of their hard boiled plant based eggs, Nestlé’s Garden Gourmet range has a plant-based omelette mix already for sale in Europe, and JUST Eggs have popped up in well-known outlets like Canada’s Tim Horton’s. 

👀 Who? (65 companies in this space)

🥚  Case study: WunderEggs by Crafty Counter

  • WunderEggs, based out of Austin, Texas, wants you to have your eggs and eat them too. 
  • Catering to consumers who care about the planet and healthy eating, the dippy egg substitute has been dreamt up by plant-based brand Crafty Counter, best known for their lentil veggie burgers and bites.
  • WunderEggs are the first whole food plant-based hard boiled eggs that offer similar nutritional benefits to conventional eggs. Made from almonds and cashews, coconut milk, turmeric, probiotics and black salt, the product is also free from soy and gluten. 
  • Like conventional hard boiled eggs, WunderEggs have both a white and a yolk. Thanks to proprietary processing technology, they also have a super long shelf life - up to 120 days!
  • The eggs are apparently an industry first, as the only ready-to-eat hard boiled egg substitute suitable for vegans. 
  • And as of autumn 2021, the company’s eggy invention is now patent-pending
  • As soon as that patent is granted, Crafty Counter plans to release its plant-based vegan boiled egg to market.

🍳  Case study: YoEgg

  • Israel’s YoEgg is reimagining everyone’s favourite egg dishes with its entirely plant-based full egg substitute. Fried, egged, poached or boiled, the brand has many more versions in the works too. 
  • YoEgg! Co-founder and CEO Eran Groner shared that "The most important thing (for plant-based eggs) is to get the right experience and a favorable taste profile. These two are inseparable"
  • YoEgg state that their goal clearly is: to become the largest and most sustainable egg manufacturer in the world, no chickens necessary. 
  • The fully vegan egg substitute is made from a proprietary blend of vegetable proteins, oil and algae - and it’s free from cholesterol too and carries no risk of egg-associated illnesses like salmonella.
  • Made up of a faux white and a yolk, both are now patent-pending. 
  • Currently only available in Israel at select restaurants, the brand has big plans to launch further afield in 2022. 
  • And with the first reviews coming in, the signs are good – described by some of the initial tasters as ‘one of the best plant-based alternatives ever’.

👍 The good

  • The rise in egg replacers will not only benefit vegans: many firms are targeting the large flexitarian market, with most products - except those genetically identical to chicken eggs - also suitable for those with an egg allergy. 
  • Egg replacements have health benefits, just like normal eggs, with producers eager to make the nutritional benefits of their alternative products apparent. And by carefully selecting what they include in a product, alt-egg brands can sell substitutes that are high in protein but free from cholesterol, with all the vitamins and nutrients found in real eggs. 
  • In the bakery and confectionery segments, it’s clear most consumers don’t care whether they’re eating real eggs or not - as long as their food tastes good. So the wave of new, authentic-tasting egg replacers should pave the way for more vegan baked goods and treats.
  • The wealth of variety when it comes to substitutes for real eggs is a boon for those who follow a plant-based diet and those who don’t alike. No longer constrained to liquid egg alternatives, the new tranche of whole eggs, vegan scrambles, ready-to-eat products and more are likely to lure in new customers. 

👎 The bad

  • While millennials and Gen Z-ers are driving demand for egg alternatives, brands may have a harder time convincing older consumers to accept egg substitutes. 
  • Alt-egg startups also need to create ‘clean label’ products to satisfy consumer demands around health and nutrition, while still keeping their products authentic and cost-effective.
  • Despite many advances in the category, analysis by ProVeg found that no chicken egg alternative currently available can be substituted like for like in baking without modifications. That will need to change if home bakers are to be lured away from the siren call of actual eggs.
  • The vast majority of plant-based eggs are still more expensive than conventional chicken’s eggs. While the vegan substitutes aren’t subject to the same seasonal pricing fluctuations as conventional eggs, it’s yet to be determined whether consumers will be happy to pay more for ethical substitutes. 

 💡The bottom line

  • Just like the plant-based milk and meat markets before it, chicken-free eggs are proving more and more popular for reasons of ethics, environment and more.
  • Given the growth in the market, consumers also now have more options to choose from. While that’s partly a good development, it means more competition for the producers of plant-based eggs: shoppers will quickly head to the most lifelike substitutes, so manufacturers need to put in the effort to get their products just right. 
  • The scramble by investors to fund these startups is proof of the sector’s promise, but brands will have to make their substitutes as chicken-like as possible to win over lifelong egg lovers.

How did you like today's Trends?

Love it 😁 Meh 😐 Hate it 🙁

🐔 What is it?

  • Plant-based eggs are nothing new, and keen readers will note we’ve written plenty about the trend before.
  • But in light of Veganuary and a new year of innovations to come, we thought we’d take you on a whistlestop scramble of the latest developments in the egg-free space…

🤔 Tell me more…

  • As you might already know, making alternative eggs - using plants, proteins or otherwise - isn’t exactly something that comes easy. 
  • And customers have high expectations of their plant-based substitutes, following on from the success of meat mimickers like the Impossible Burger. People want eggs they can fry, poach, scramble and whisk up well in an everyday bake. And if that’s not already asking for a lot, customers also want them to have the same health benefits and texture of normal eggs too…
  • Yet despite the difficulties involved, the sector is booming. In 2020, vegan eggs were the fastest-growing segment in the plant-based market, 
  • From hardboiled alt eggs to yolk-only substitutes, plant-based breakfast burritos and vegan omelettes, let’s dive into the softly whipped peaks of the burgeoning plant-based egg market.

🤷 Why?

  • For many eggs are a staple food - appropriate for breakfast, a quick lunch or to be whisked up into a birthday cake. Yet this everyday food comes with a cost: 9 in 10 of the 1 trillion eggs consumed annually around the globe are the product of factory farming. More and more people are willing to try out alternatives for ethical or environmental reasons: a survey by the Vegan Society found that 98% of non-vegans would happily sample a plant-based egg. 
  • The first plant-based egg brands paved the way for today’s new raft of startups: Eat Just, who make JUST Egg, was founded back in 2011 and showed that there was real demand for plant-based liquid egg alternatives. This helped build consumer acceptance for egg alternatives during the 2010s, leading the way for ingredients companies and brands working on more niche plant-based egg substitutes like hard boiled versions and egg white alternatives.
  • The growing egg alternative market is also a sign that it’s a space where startups can stretch out and make their mark - something of an untapped market compared to meat-free burgers and plant milks. Analysis by the EIT found that there’s still an insufficient number of egg substitutes to meet demand in Europe, despite recent growth in the sector. That’s changing, with a few companies attracting significant funding and more versatile applications arising.. 

📈 The figures

  • Worldwide, the egg replacement market is on the up and up: it was valued at 1.4 billion in 2021 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6% until 2026.

🔍 How is it shaping up?

  • The boom in egg alternatives means there’s suddenly something for almost everyone: home bakers, breakfast lovers, anyone who loves a pot of mayo with their (vegan) burger. 
  • Many of the egg alternatives that gained popularity in the last decade were liquid-only substitutes; easier for manufacturers to perfect, and potentially easier for consumers to accept than a fully-fledged egg with a shell, white and yolk. This is still the biggest sub-segment in the alt-egg world, with lots of new startups on the scene (check out the full list below!). 
  • Now there’s also companies working on ‘all-purpose’ eggs that can be used in all of the same ways as the chicken-laid variety. Zero Egg, based in Israel, is doing just that, honing in on applications for the food industry to make plant-based eggs a viable alternative on a broader scale. 
  • Other ‘whole egg’ replacement brands include Germany’s Bettr Egg, Swiss EggField and Singapore’s OnlyEg by Float Foods. Then there’s those mimicking hard boiled eggs: WunderEggs and Osomoegg.
  • Some companies, meanwhile, are focusing on the B2B egg ingredients market for the bakery, foodservice and CPG sectors - a segment that’s growing at a CAGR of 6.2% - making it attractive to both startup founders and investors. EVO Foods in India, an emerging market for plant-based eggs, is one company targeting foodservice - joined by Brazil’s N.Ovo and Japan’s Next Egg.
  • Many brands across all of these segments are working to reduce their ingredients lists too. Following the backlash to long ingredients lists on vegan meats, plant-based egg producers are taking note. Crackd, in the UK, is one such brand - the startup’s liquid egg alternative now has just 13 ingredients. It may sound like a lot - but it’s really not when it comes to plant-based eggs. SavorEat, who make an egg alternative for the ingredients industry called Egg’n’up, are opting for natural binding agents to boost their clean label credentials. 
  • Liquid egg white alternatives for baking are also a growing niche. Home bakers, vegan or flexi, are keen to try out plant-based versions of meringue and baked goods - and bakery manufacturers want to offer authentic vegan substitutes to their customers too. OGGS is one of the most well-known liquid egg white alternatives, but other contenders in this space include Yumgo Blanc and InnovoPro
  • And in a key sign the trend for alt eggs is going mainstream, big names are getting involved too. Migros late last year announced the launch of their hard boiled plant based eggs, Nestlé’s Garden Gourmet range has a plant-based omelette mix already for sale in Europe, and JUST Eggs have popped up in well-known outlets like Canada’s Tim Horton’s. 

👀 Who? (65 companies in this space)

🥚  Case study: WunderEggs by Crafty Counter

  • WunderEggs, based out of Austin, Texas, wants you to have your eggs and eat them too. 
  • Catering to consumers who care about the planet and healthy eating, the dippy egg substitute has been dreamt up by plant-based brand Crafty Counter, best known for their lentil veggie burgers and bites.
  • WunderEggs are the first whole food plant-based hard boiled eggs that offer similar nutritional benefits to conventional eggs. Made from almonds and cashews, coconut milk, turmeric, probiotics and black salt, the product is also free from soy and gluten. 
  • Like conventional hard boiled eggs, WunderEggs have both a white and a yolk. Thanks to proprietary processing technology, they also have a super long shelf life - up to 120 days!
  • The eggs are apparently an industry first, as the only ready-to-eat hard boiled egg substitute suitable for vegans. 
  • And as of autumn 2021, the company’s eggy invention is now patent-pending
  • As soon as that patent is granted, Crafty Counter plans to release its plant-based vegan boiled egg to market.

🍳  Case study: YoEgg

  • Israel’s YoEgg is reimagining everyone’s favourite egg dishes with its entirely plant-based full egg substitute. Fried, egged, poached or boiled, the brand has many more versions in the works too. 
  • YoEgg! Co-founder and CEO Eran Groner shared that "The most important thing (for plant-based eggs) is to get the right experience and a favorable taste profile. These two are inseparable"
  • YoEgg state that their goal clearly is: to become the largest and most sustainable egg manufacturer in the world, no chickens necessary. 
  • The fully vegan egg substitute is made from a proprietary blend of vegetable proteins, oil and algae - and it’s free from cholesterol too and carries no risk of egg-associated illnesses like salmonella.
  • Made up of a faux white and a yolk, both are now patent-pending. 
  • Currently only available in Israel at select restaurants, the brand has big plans to launch further afield in 2022. 
  • And with the first reviews coming in, the signs are good – described by some of the initial tasters as ‘one of the best plant-based alternatives ever’.

👍 The good

  • The rise in egg replacers will not only benefit vegans: many firms are targeting the large flexitarian market, with most products - except those genetically identical to chicken eggs - also suitable for those with an egg allergy. 
  • Egg replacements have health benefits, just like normal eggs, with producers eager to make the nutritional benefits of their alternative products apparent. And by carefully selecting what they include in a product, alt-egg brands can sell substitutes that are high in protein but free from cholesterol, with all the vitamins and nutrients found in real eggs. 
  • In the bakery and confectionery segments, it’s clear most consumers don’t care whether they’re eating real eggs or not - as long as their food tastes good. So the wave of new, authentic-tasting egg replacers should pave the way for more vegan baked goods and treats.
  • The wealth of variety when it comes to substitutes for real eggs is a boon for those who follow a plant-based diet and those who don’t alike. No longer constrained to liquid egg alternatives, the new tranche of whole eggs, vegan scrambles, ready-to-eat products and more are likely to lure in new customers. 

👎 The bad

  • While millennials and Gen Z-ers are driving demand for egg alternatives, brands may have a harder time convincing older consumers to accept egg substitutes. 
  • Alt-egg startups also need to create ‘clean label’ products to satisfy consumer demands around health and nutrition, while still keeping their products authentic and cost-effective.
  • Despite many advances in the category, analysis by ProVeg found that no chicken egg alternative currently available can be substituted like for like in baking without modifications. That will need to change if home bakers are to be lured away from the siren call of actual eggs.
  • The vast majority of plant-based eggs are still more expensive than conventional chicken’s eggs. While the vegan substitutes aren’t subject to the same seasonal pricing fluctuations as conventional eggs, it’s yet to be determined whether consumers will be happy to pay more for ethical substitutes. 

 💡The bottom line

  • Just like the plant-based milk and meat markets before it, chicken-free eggs are proving more and more popular for reasons of ethics, environment and more.
  • Given the growth in the market, consumers also now have more options to choose from. While that’s partly a good development, it means more competition for the producers of plant-based eggs: shoppers will quickly head to the most lifelike substitutes, so manufacturers need to put in the effort to get their products just right. 
  • The scramble by investors to fund these startups is proof of the sector’s promise, but brands will have to make their substitutes as chicken-like as possible to win over lifelong egg lovers.

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