Protecting your brand: 3 Tips and tricks for entrepreneurs just starting out

Protecting your brand: 3 Tips and tricks for entrepreneurs just starting out

By
Novagraaf
March 22, 2021

Last week, we interviewed Veronica Fil and Shaun Quade from Grounded Foods Co, a rising star in the plant-based cheese movement based in LA, about how they managed to protect their IP as they grew. They’ve entered the market with a range of plant-based cheeses that has generated a lot of interest, not only among consumers, but also among companies looking to gain a foothold in the plant-based protein market.

Credit: Shaun Quade

As the CEO of a fledgling business with a great idea in a highly competitive sector, Veronica had a deep understanding that intellectual property (IP) was her ace to play in building an economic moat that would enable Grounded Foods to pursue its R&D freely and to build a strong presence in the market.

Read Veronica’s full interview on how she secured Grounded Foods’ first IP rights 

Today, we asked Veronica what IP advice she might have for budding entrepreneurs that are just starting out. 

She lived through the basic conundrum facing all new businesses, namely charting a course for the long term when beset with the uncertainty as to whether the business will live to see another day. In this situation, one must set priorities. While IP may not be the very first item on your list, it should be pretty close. Veronica told us that she and Shaun started thinking IP seriously only five months into the life of Grounded Foods. 

3 pieces of advice on IP matters for entrepreneurs just starting out


  1. Understand what makes your IP. Understand how the various components of the IP system work and think concretely about how they can help you secure your position in the market. You may find that some IP rights may not be a priority at the beginning, but still, don’t lose sight of their potential later in the game.
  1. Start first with the IP you can afford. Your opening IP game should be played with a view towards the ways in which you’ll engage with your customers and with the market more generally, now and in the future.


  1. Secure your online presence: If your online presence is going to play a big role in the life of your company, go big and purchase domain names, secure social media accounts and so on.

For her part, Veronica is sure that she’ll continue to use IP in the future. Grounded Foods is playing the long game: “cheese without cheese” is but the first move in the creation of what Veronica intends to be a large-scale plant-based protein company. With Shaun’s culinary brio and Veronica’s IP savvy, they just might pull it off.

Written by Anca Draganescu-Pinawin
Head of Online Brand Protection at Novagraaf

Book an introduction meeting with Anca and her team for any advices on how to best protect your growing food business with a strong IP strategy.


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Last week, we interviewed Veronica Fil and Shaun Quade from Grounded Foods Co, a rising star in the plant-based cheese movement based in LA, about how they managed to protect their IP as they grew. They’ve entered the market with a range of plant-based cheeses that has generated a lot of interest, not only among consumers, but also among companies looking to gain a foothold in the plant-based protein market.

Credit: Shaun Quade

As the CEO of a fledgling business with a great idea in a highly competitive sector, Veronica had a deep understanding that intellectual property (IP) was her ace to play in building an economic moat that would enable Grounded Foods to pursue its R&D freely and to build a strong presence in the market.

Read Veronica’s full interview on how she secured Grounded Foods’ first IP rights 

Today, we asked Veronica what IP advice she might have for budding entrepreneurs that are just starting out. 

She lived through the basic conundrum facing all new businesses, namely charting a course for the long term when beset with the uncertainty as to whether the business will live to see another day. In this situation, one must set priorities. While IP may not be the very first item on your list, it should be pretty close. Veronica told us that she and Shaun started thinking IP seriously only five months into the life of Grounded Foods. 

3 pieces of advice on IP matters for entrepreneurs just starting out


  1. Understand what makes your IP. Understand how the various components of the IP system work and think concretely about how they can help you secure your position in the market. You may find that some IP rights may not be a priority at the beginning, but still, don’t lose sight of their potential later in the game.
  1. Start first with the IP you can afford. Your opening IP game should be played with a view towards the ways in which you’ll engage with your customers and with the market more generally, now and in the future.


  1. Secure your online presence: If your online presence is going to play a big role in the life of your company, go big and purchase domain names, secure social media accounts and so on.

For her part, Veronica is sure that she’ll continue to use IP in the future. Grounded Foods is playing the long game: “cheese without cheese” is but the first move in the creation of what Veronica intends to be a large-scale plant-based protein company. With Shaun’s culinary brio and Veronica’s IP savvy, they just might pull it off.

Written by Anca Draganescu-Pinawin
Head of Online Brand Protection at Novagraaf

Book an introduction meeting with Anca and her team for any advices on how to best protect your growing food business with a strong IP strategy.


Last week, we interviewed Veronica Fil and Shaun Quade from Grounded Foods Co, a rising star in the plant-based cheese movement based in LA, about how they managed to protect their IP as they grew. They’ve entered the market with a range of plant-based cheeses that has generated a lot of interest, not only among consumers, but also among companies looking to gain a foothold in the plant-based protein market.

Credit: Shaun Quade

As the CEO of a fledgling business with a great idea in a highly competitive sector, Veronica had a deep understanding that intellectual property (IP) was her ace to play in building an economic moat that would enable Grounded Foods to pursue its R&D freely and to build a strong presence in the market.

Read Veronica’s full interview on how she secured Grounded Foods’ first IP rights 

Today, we asked Veronica what IP advice she might have for budding entrepreneurs that are just starting out. 

She lived through the basic conundrum facing all new businesses, namely charting a course for the long term when beset with the uncertainty as to whether the business will live to see another day. In this situation, one must set priorities. While IP may not be the very first item on your list, it should be pretty close. Veronica told us that she and Shaun started thinking IP seriously only five months into the life of Grounded Foods. 

3 pieces of advice on IP matters for entrepreneurs just starting out


  1. Understand what makes your IP. Understand how the various components of the IP system work and think concretely about how they can help you secure your position in the market. You may find that some IP rights may not be a priority at the beginning, but still, don’t lose sight of their potential later in the game.
  1. Start first with the IP you can afford. Your opening IP game should be played with a view towards the ways in which you’ll engage with your customers and with the market more generally, now and in the future.


  1. Secure your online presence: If your online presence is going to play a big role in the life of your company, go big and purchase domain names, secure social media accounts and so on.

For her part, Veronica is sure that she’ll continue to use IP in the future. Grounded Foods is playing the long game: “cheese without cheese” is but the first move in the creation of what Veronica intends to be a large-scale plant-based protein company. With Shaun’s culinary brio and Veronica’s IP savvy, they just might pull it off.

Written by Anca Draganescu-Pinawin
Head of Online Brand Protection at Novagraaf

Book an introduction meeting with Anca and her team for any advices on how to best protect your growing food business with a strong IP strategy.


Last week, we interviewed Veronica Fil and Shaun Quade from Grounded Foods Co, a rising star in the plant-based cheese movement based in LA, about how they managed to protect their IP as they grew. They’ve entered the market with a range of plant-based cheeses that has generated a lot of interest, not only among consumers, but also among companies looking to gain a foothold in the plant-based protein market.

Credit: Shaun Quade

As the CEO of a fledgling business with a great idea in a highly competitive sector, Veronica had a deep understanding that intellectual property (IP) was her ace to play in building an economic moat that would enable Grounded Foods to pursue its R&D freely and to build a strong presence in the market.

Read Veronica’s full interview on how she secured Grounded Foods’ first IP rights 

Today, we asked Veronica what IP advice she might have for budding entrepreneurs that are just starting out. 

She lived through the basic conundrum facing all new businesses, namely charting a course for the long term when beset with the uncertainty as to whether the business will live to see another day. In this situation, one must set priorities. While IP may not be the very first item on your list, it should be pretty close. Veronica told us that she and Shaun started thinking IP seriously only five months into the life of Grounded Foods. 

3 pieces of advice on IP matters for entrepreneurs just starting out


  1. Understand what makes your IP. Understand how the various components of the IP system work and think concretely about how they can help you secure your position in the market. You may find that some IP rights may not be a priority at the beginning, but still, don’t lose sight of their potential later in the game.
  1. Start first with the IP you can afford. Your opening IP game should be played with a view towards the ways in which you’ll engage with your customers and with the market more generally, now and in the future.


  1. Secure your online presence: If your online presence is going to play a big role in the life of your company, go big and purchase domain names, secure social media accounts and so on.

For her part, Veronica is sure that she’ll continue to use IP in the future. Grounded Foods is playing the long game: “cheese without cheese” is but the first move in the creation of what Veronica intends to be a large-scale plant-based protein company. With Shaun’s culinary brio and Veronica’s IP savvy, they just might pull it off.

Written by Anca Draganescu-Pinawin
Head of Online Brand Protection at Novagraaf

Book an introduction meeting with Anca and her team for any advices on how to best protect your growing food business with a strong IP strategy.


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