Should your business go vegan? Opportunities in the alternatives market

Should your business go vegan? Opportunities in the alternatives market

By
Laura Robinson
August 11, 2020

A steaming bowl of pasta, but no parmesan. That perfect sandwich, minus the mayo. Munching on a mountain of leaves, while your meat-eating friends tuck into a restaurant’s finest steak. In the past, these little sacrifices were part and parcel of being a food-loving vegan.

But as going meatless makes it increasingly mainstream, consumers looking to cut out or cut back on animal products are almost spoilt for choice. Gone are the days of cardboard veggie burgers and rubbery cheese. Vegans are now chowing down on all manner of alternatives – from haggis, Peking duck and Swedish meatballs to no-fish sauce and cheese-less pesto.

And it’s not only consumers who are benefitting. Reports have shown that vegan products can help to fatten supermarkets’ and restaurants’ profit margins, as ingredients used are typically cheaper and final products can be sold at up to a 50% price premium. So it’s no surprise that the global vegan food market is due to grow by 10.5% year on year, reaching around $31.4 billion by 2026.

This week, we take a look at the wealth of vegan products making their way into shopping baskets and onto restaurant menus and explore how brands are navigating the choppy but promisingly profitable waters of the alternatives market.

Drivers: ethical indulgence and accessing a broader customer base

With countless celebrities and influencers jumping on the bandwagon, it’s never been cooler to be vegan. Coupled with greater awareness of how animal-based products are made, veganism is the most discussed diet in the US and reports claim that 25% of the UK population will be vegan or veggie by 2025. But regardless of their individual whys, these consumers don’t want to sacrifice taste. However much you love your veggies, a diet made up of wholefood salads alone won’t cut it. So many new vegans are looking for products that provide a different mouthfeel or a tasty sauce or topping that makes it quick and easy for them to adapt their favourite dishes.  

Then there are the growing armies of flexitarians following predominantly plant-based diets, who tend to be more motivated by personal health than ethical or environmental concerns. Interestingly, the majority of consumers buying vegan and vegetarian products fall into this category. To benefit, products just need to be deemed to be healthier and just as tasty as the animal-based original. This means that manufacturers and restaurants that create genuinely indulgent vegan offerings can also attract veggie, plant-based and health-conscious consumers too.

Beyond burgers: cold cuts and pâté, sauces and dressing, chocolate and wine  

When it comes to alternatives, dairy has long been the largest product segment. Over the last few years, vegan cheese has transformed from plasticky squares to something that even the most discerning Frenchman could pop in his baguette. Alternative meat has also made it mainstream, driving manufacturers and retailers to diversify their offer to include bacon, deli slices and pâté in their ranges. The alternative egg market is similarly booming, with top-selling brand, JUST Egg,recently announcing that they've sold the plant-based equivalent of 50 million eggs in a market that is estimated to reach $1373.4 million by 2023.

But there are also plenty of opportunities for budding entrepreneurs to develop new offerings in emerging categories. The vegan sauces, dressings and spreads segment, for example – including vegan fish sauce, pesto and mayonnaise - is also predicted to grow by 8.2% from 2020 to 2026, bolstered by growing demand in the food allergies and intolerance markets. Then there’s the luxury product segments, including chocolate, desserts, non-alcoholic sparkling drinks and wine.  

The new kids on the block: Plantcraft, This is not Parmesan and VAYO

Since its launch in mid-July, plant-based alternatives have dominated the FoodHack Discovery board. Plantcraft, a Budapest-based start-up creating healthier and animal free alternatives to processed meat products from green bananas and discarded grape seeds - bagged fifth place in the first week’s vote. While completing the ProVeg incubation programme, the company secured $500k to expand distribution of their pepperoni, deli slices and pâté in the US. Investors were apparently seduced by the economic potential of creating meat products at prices lower than traditionally farmed meat. But, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the team has since adapted their strategy and will now be looking to launch in the EU before the end of the year.

The second week’s vote saw five vegan contenders battle it out for the top spot. It’s not hard to guess which famous Italian cheese Willicroft’s This is not Parmesan is standing in for. Founder Brad Vanstone, grandson of a dairy farmer who went plant-based for the planet, recognized that cheese was often the final hurdle when it came to enjoying a vegan diet. So, he created his own – and before long, his hobby turned into a business. Despite his products’ early success, Brad is aware of the criticism around cashew nut based cheeses and is looking to switch to a more locally grown alternative in the longer term.

And just as Brad was cooking up his cheese, the Switzerland-based team behind VAYO was founding Connie’s Kitchen. VAYO is a plant-based mayonnaise made from rescued linseed flour instead of eggs that came in third when featured on the Discovery board. The product’s launch in June marked the team’s expansion from ketchup to the healthier condiments category. In addition to its core vegan credentials, their marketing messages pay equal attention to personal and planetary health as well as the creaminess of the product itself. Judging by their growing online community of supporters, this has proved to be a winning combination for their target market of future-focused parents.

Beyond ticking boxes: measuring impact and shifting supply

While the growth of vegan, veggie and flexitarian communities is encouraging more start-ups to set up shop in this area, the wider range of products available is also making it easier for consumers who are still sitting on the fence to make the switch.

But canny entrepreneurs will not forget that a vegan product isn’t automatically healthier or more sustainable. New brands need to think carefully about their ingredient sourcing, production methods and how they measure and communicate their impact to win over increasingly savvy consumers.

A key part of this will be considering how system-wide shifts affect local food systems – not just on an environmental but also on a human level. In a crowded marketplace, the story of the company that supports local farmers to shift supply, rather than just responding to demand, may just be that extra dollop of vegan mayonnaise that convinces customers to buy their juicy plant-based burgers.

Business opportunities

  • Want to extend the reach of your product? Market beyond vegan alone. Highlight the health-focused, functional benefits of your alternative product to attract occasional plant-based eaters and flexitarians as well as ethically minded vegans and veggies.  

  • Eager to attract plant-based diners? Commit to plant-based options. Offering a bowl of fresh veggies alongside your more creative meat-based dishes is no longer going to cut it for the majority of vegan and veggie consumers. Consider how you use the latest alternative products to create truly tongue-tantalizing versions of your bestsellers.

  • Looking to create a new vegan product? Try playing into the allergies and clean eating markets by creating a healthy, oil-free vegan sauce or dressing to spice up buddha bowls, salads or wraps in restaurants or at home. Or develop a brand that creates more consumer choice in the growing plant-based dairy, fish, meats or eggs categories.  

Written by
Laura Robinson

From policy geek to digital consultant, Laura has always enjoyed bringing people together through words or tools to drive positive change. She is most proud of finally taking the leap into entrepreneurship by founding Pink Pear Agency - a network of passionate specialists who help food businesses grow innovative projects and share their stories with the world. Laura is currently interested in project development and management, digital tools, content strategy and copywriting.

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  • Access Member Directory
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A steaming bowl of pasta, but no parmesan. That perfect sandwich, minus the mayo. Munching on a mountain of leaves, while your meat-eating friends tuck into a restaurant’s finest steak. In the past, these little sacrifices were part and parcel of being a food-loving vegan.

But as going meatless makes it increasingly mainstream, consumers looking to cut out or cut back on animal products are almost spoilt for choice. Gone are the days of cardboard veggie burgers and rubbery cheese. Vegans are now chowing down on all manner of alternatives – from haggis, Peking duck and Swedish meatballs to no-fish sauce and cheese-less pesto.

And it’s not only consumers who are benefitting. Reports have shown that vegan products can help to fatten supermarkets’ and restaurants’ profit margins, as ingredients used are typically cheaper and final products can be sold at up to a 50% price premium. So it’s no surprise that the global vegan food market is due to grow by 10.5% year on year, reaching around $31.4 billion by 2026.

This week, we take a look at the wealth of vegan products making their way into shopping baskets and onto restaurant menus and explore how brands are navigating the choppy but promisingly profitable waters of the alternatives market.

Drivers: ethical indulgence and accessing a broader customer base

With countless celebrities and influencers jumping on the bandwagon, it’s never been cooler to be vegan. Coupled with greater awareness of how animal-based products are made, veganism is the most discussed diet in the US and reports claim that 25% of the UK population will be vegan or veggie by 2025. But regardless of their individual whys, these consumers don’t want to sacrifice taste. However much you love your veggies, a diet made up of wholefood salads alone won’t cut it. So many new vegans are looking for products that provide a different mouthfeel or a tasty sauce or topping that makes it quick and easy for them to adapt their favourite dishes.  

Then there are the growing armies of flexitarians following predominantly plant-based diets, who tend to be more motivated by personal health than ethical or environmental concerns. Interestingly, the majority of consumers buying vegan and vegetarian products fall into this category. To benefit, products just need to be deemed to be healthier and just as tasty as the animal-based original. This means that manufacturers and restaurants that create genuinely indulgent vegan offerings can also attract veggie, plant-based and health-conscious consumers too.

Beyond burgers: cold cuts and pâté, sauces and dressing, chocolate and wine  

When it comes to alternatives, dairy has long been the largest product segment. Over the last few years, vegan cheese has transformed from plasticky squares to something that even the most discerning Frenchman could pop in his baguette. Alternative meat has also made it mainstream, driving manufacturers and retailers to diversify their offer to include bacon, deli slices and pâté in their ranges. The alternative egg market is similarly booming, with top-selling brand, JUST Egg,recently announcing that they've sold the plant-based equivalent of 50 million eggs in a market that is estimated to reach $1373.4 million by 2023.

But there are also plenty of opportunities for budding entrepreneurs to develop new offerings in emerging categories. The vegan sauces, dressings and spreads segment, for example – including vegan fish sauce, pesto and mayonnaise - is also predicted to grow by 8.2% from 2020 to 2026, bolstered by growing demand in the food allergies and intolerance markets. Then there’s the luxury product segments, including chocolate, desserts, non-alcoholic sparkling drinks and wine.  

The new kids on the block: Plantcraft, This is not Parmesan and VAYO

Since its launch in mid-July, plant-based alternatives have dominated the FoodHack Discovery board. Plantcraft, a Budapest-based start-up creating healthier and animal free alternatives to processed meat products from green bananas and discarded grape seeds - bagged fifth place in the first week’s vote. While completing the ProVeg incubation programme, the company secured $500k to expand distribution of their pepperoni, deli slices and pâté in the US. Investors were apparently seduced by the economic potential of creating meat products at prices lower than traditionally farmed meat. But, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the team has since adapted their strategy and will now be looking to launch in the EU before the end of the year.

The second week’s vote saw five vegan contenders battle it out for the top spot. It’s not hard to guess which famous Italian cheese Willicroft’s This is not Parmesan is standing in for. Founder Brad Vanstone, grandson of a dairy farmer who went plant-based for the planet, recognized that cheese was often the final hurdle when it came to enjoying a vegan diet. So, he created his own – and before long, his hobby turned into a business. Despite his products’ early success, Brad is aware of the criticism around cashew nut based cheeses and is looking to switch to a more locally grown alternative in the longer term.

And just as Brad was cooking up his cheese, the Switzerland-based team behind VAYO was founding Connie’s Kitchen. VAYO is a plant-based mayonnaise made from rescued linseed flour instead of eggs that came in third when featured on the Discovery board. The product’s launch in June marked the team’s expansion from ketchup to the healthier condiments category. In addition to its core vegan credentials, their marketing messages pay equal attention to personal and planetary health as well as the creaminess of the product itself. Judging by their growing online community of supporters, this has proved to be a winning combination for their target market of future-focused parents.

Beyond ticking boxes: measuring impact and shifting supply

While the growth of vegan, veggie and flexitarian communities is encouraging more start-ups to set up shop in this area, the wider range of products available is also making it easier for consumers who are still sitting on the fence to make the switch.

But canny entrepreneurs will not forget that a vegan product isn’t automatically healthier or more sustainable. New brands need to think carefully about their ingredient sourcing, production methods and how they measure and communicate their impact to win over increasingly savvy consumers.

A key part of this will be considering how system-wide shifts affect local food systems – not just on an environmental but also on a human level. In a crowded marketplace, the story of the company that supports local farmers to shift supply, rather than just responding to demand, may just be that extra dollop of vegan mayonnaise that convinces customers to buy their juicy plant-based burgers.

Business opportunities

  • Want to extend the reach of your product? Market beyond vegan alone. Highlight the health-focused, functional benefits of your alternative product to attract occasional plant-based eaters and flexitarians as well as ethically minded vegans and veggies.  

  • Eager to attract plant-based diners? Commit to plant-based options. Offering a bowl of fresh veggies alongside your more creative meat-based dishes is no longer going to cut it for the majority of vegan and veggie consumers. Consider how you use the latest alternative products to create truly tongue-tantalizing versions of your bestsellers.

  • Looking to create a new vegan product? Try playing into the allergies and clean eating markets by creating a healthy, oil-free vegan sauce or dressing to spice up buddha bowls, salads or wraps in restaurants or at home. Or develop a brand that creates more consumer choice in the growing plant-based dairy, fish, meats or eggs categories.  

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A steaming bowl of pasta, but no parmesan. That perfect sandwich, minus the mayo. Munching on a mountain of leaves, while your meat-eating friends tuck into a restaurant’s finest steak. In the past, these little sacrifices were part and parcel of being a food-loving vegan.

But as going meatless makes it increasingly mainstream, consumers looking to cut out or cut back on animal products are almost spoilt for choice. Gone are the days of cardboard veggie burgers and rubbery cheese. Vegans are now chowing down on all manner of alternatives – from haggis, Peking duck and Swedish meatballs to no-fish sauce and cheese-less pesto.

And it’s not only consumers who are benefitting. Reports have shown that vegan products can help to fatten supermarkets’ and restaurants’ profit margins, as ingredients used are typically cheaper and final products can be sold at up to a 50% price premium. So it’s no surprise that the global vegan food market is due to grow by 10.5% year on year, reaching around $31.4 billion by 2026.

This week, we take a look at the wealth of vegan products making their way into shopping baskets and onto restaurant menus and explore how brands are navigating the choppy but promisingly profitable waters of the alternatives market.

Drivers: ethical indulgence and accessing a broader customer base

With countless celebrities and influencers jumping on the bandwagon, it’s never been cooler to be vegan. Coupled with greater awareness of how animal-based products are made, veganism is the most discussed diet in the US and reports claim that 25% of the UK population will be vegan or veggie by 2025. But regardless of their individual whys, these consumers don’t want to sacrifice taste. However much you love your veggies, a diet made up of wholefood salads alone won’t cut it. So many new vegans are looking for products that provide a different mouthfeel or a tasty sauce or topping that makes it quick and easy for them to adapt their favourite dishes.  

Then there are the growing armies of flexitarians following predominantly plant-based diets, who tend to be more motivated by personal health than ethical or environmental concerns. Interestingly, the majority of consumers buying vegan and vegetarian products fall into this category. To benefit, products just need to be deemed to be healthier and just as tasty as the animal-based original. This means that manufacturers and restaurants that create genuinely indulgent vegan offerings can also attract veggie, plant-based and health-conscious consumers too.

Beyond burgers: cold cuts and pâté, sauces and dressing, chocolate and wine  

When it comes to alternatives, dairy has long been the largest product segment. Over the last few years, vegan cheese has transformed from plasticky squares to something that even the most discerning Frenchman could pop in his baguette. Alternative meat has also made it mainstream, driving manufacturers and retailers to diversify their offer to include bacon, deli slices and pâté in their ranges. The alternative egg market is similarly booming, with top-selling brand, JUST Egg,recently announcing that they've sold the plant-based equivalent of 50 million eggs in a market that is estimated to reach $1373.4 million by 2023.

But there are also plenty of opportunities for budding entrepreneurs to develop new offerings in emerging categories. The vegan sauces, dressings and spreads segment, for example – including vegan fish sauce, pesto and mayonnaise - is also predicted to grow by 8.2% from 2020 to 2026, bolstered by growing demand in the food allergies and intolerance markets. Then there’s the luxury product segments, including chocolate, desserts, non-alcoholic sparkling drinks and wine.  

The new kids on the block: Plantcraft, This is not Parmesan and VAYO

Since its launch in mid-July, plant-based alternatives have dominated the FoodHack Discovery board. Plantcraft, a Budapest-based start-up creating healthier and animal free alternatives to processed meat products from green bananas and discarded grape seeds - bagged fifth place in the first week’s vote. While completing the ProVeg incubation programme, the company secured $500k to expand distribution of their pepperoni, deli slices and pâté in the US. Investors were apparently seduced by the economic potential of creating meat products at prices lower than traditionally farmed meat. But, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the team has since adapted their strategy and will now be looking to launch in the EU before the end of the year.

The second week’s vote saw five vegan contenders battle it out for the top spot. It’s not hard to guess which famous Italian cheese Willicroft’s This is not Parmesan is standing in for. Founder Brad Vanstone, grandson of a dairy farmer who went plant-based for the planet, recognized that cheese was often the final hurdle when it came to enjoying a vegan diet. So, he created his own – and before long, his hobby turned into a business. Despite his products’ early success, Brad is aware of the criticism around cashew nut based cheeses and is looking to switch to a more locally grown alternative in the longer term.

And just as Brad was cooking up his cheese, the Switzerland-based team behind VAYO was founding Connie’s Kitchen. VAYO is a plant-based mayonnaise made from rescued linseed flour instead of eggs that came in third when featured on the Discovery board. The product’s launch in June marked the team’s expansion from ketchup to the healthier condiments category. In addition to its core vegan credentials, their marketing messages pay equal attention to personal and planetary health as well as the creaminess of the product itself. Judging by their growing online community of supporters, this has proved to be a winning combination for their target market of future-focused parents.

Beyond ticking boxes: measuring impact and shifting supply

While the growth of vegan, veggie and flexitarian communities is encouraging more start-ups to set up shop in this area, the wider range of products available is also making it easier for consumers who are still sitting on the fence to make the switch.

But canny entrepreneurs will not forget that a vegan product isn’t automatically healthier or more sustainable. New brands need to think carefully about their ingredient sourcing, production methods and how they measure and communicate their impact to win over increasingly savvy consumers.

A key part of this will be considering how system-wide shifts affect local food systems – not just on an environmental but also on a human level. In a crowded marketplace, the story of the company that supports local farmers to shift supply, rather than just responding to demand, may just be that extra dollop of vegan mayonnaise that convinces customers to buy their juicy plant-based burgers.

Business opportunities

  • Want to extend the reach of your product? Market beyond vegan alone. Highlight the health-focused, functional benefits of your alternative product to attract occasional plant-based eaters and flexitarians as well as ethically minded vegans and veggies.  

  • Eager to attract plant-based diners? Commit to plant-based options. Offering a bowl of fresh veggies alongside your more creative meat-based dishes is no longer going to cut it for the majority of vegan and veggie consumers. Consider how you use the latest alternative products to create truly tongue-tantalizing versions of your bestsellers.

  • Looking to create a new vegan product? Try playing into the allergies and clean eating markets by creating a healthy, oil-free vegan sauce or dressing to spice up buddha bowls, salads or wraps in restaurants or at home. Or develop a brand that creates more consumer choice in the growing plant-based dairy, fish, meats or eggs categories.  

A steaming bowl of pasta, but no parmesan. That perfect sandwich, minus the mayo. Munching on a mountain of leaves, while your meat-eating friends tuck into a restaurant’s finest steak. In the past, these little sacrifices were part and parcel of being a food-loving vegan.

But as going meatless makes it increasingly mainstream, consumers looking to cut out or cut back on animal products are almost spoilt for choice. Gone are the days of cardboard veggie burgers and rubbery cheese. Vegans are now chowing down on all manner of alternatives – from haggis, Peking duck and Swedish meatballs to no-fish sauce and cheese-less pesto.

And it’s not only consumers who are benefitting. Reports have shown that vegan products can help to fatten supermarkets’ and restaurants’ profit margins, as ingredients used are typically cheaper and final products can be sold at up to a 50% price premium. So it’s no surprise that the global vegan food market is due to grow by 10.5% year on year, reaching around $31.4 billion by 2026.

This week, we take a look at the wealth of vegan products making their way into shopping baskets and onto restaurant menus and explore how brands are navigating the choppy but promisingly profitable waters of the alternatives market.

Drivers: ethical indulgence and accessing a broader customer base

With countless celebrities and influencers jumping on the bandwagon, it’s never been cooler to be vegan. Coupled with greater awareness of how animal-based products are made, veganism is the most discussed diet in the US and reports claim that 25% of the UK population will be vegan or veggie by 2025. But regardless of their individual whys, these consumers don’t want to sacrifice taste. However much you love your veggies, a diet made up of wholefood salads alone won’t cut it. So many new vegans are looking for products that provide a different mouthfeel or a tasty sauce or topping that makes it quick and easy for them to adapt their favourite dishes.  

Then there are the growing armies of flexitarians following predominantly plant-based diets, who tend to be more motivated by personal health than ethical or environmental concerns. Interestingly, the majority of consumers buying vegan and vegetarian products fall into this category. To benefit, products just need to be deemed to be healthier and just as tasty as the animal-based original. This means that manufacturers and restaurants that create genuinely indulgent vegan offerings can also attract veggie, plant-based and health-conscious consumers too.

Beyond burgers: cold cuts and pâté, sauces and dressing, chocolate and wine  

When it comes to alternatives, dairy has long been the largest product segment. Over the last few years, vegan cheese has transformed from plasticky squares to something that even the most discerning Frenchman could pop in his baguette. Alternative meat has also made it mainstream, driving manufacturers and retailers to diversify their offer to include bacon, deli slices and pâté in their ranges. The alternative egg market is similarly booming, with top-selling brand, JUST Egg,recently announcing that they've sold the plant-based equivalent of 50 million eggs in a market that is estimated to reach $1373.4 million by 2023.

But there are also plenty of opportunities for budding entrepreneurs to develop new offerings in emerging categories. The vegan sauces, dressings and spreads segment, for example – including vegan fish sauce, pesto and mayonnaise - is also predicted to grow by 8.2% from 2020 to 2026, bolstered by growing demand in the food allergies and intolerance markets. Then there’s the luxury product segments, including chocolate, desserts, non-alcoholic sparkling drinks and wine.  

The new kids on the block: Plantcraft, This is not Parmesan and VAYO

Since its launch in mid-July, plant-based alternatives have dominated the FoodHack Discovery board. Plantcraft, a Budapest-based start-up creating healthier and animal free alternatives to processed meat products from green bananas and discarded grape seeds - bagged fifth place in the first week’s vote. While completing the ProVeg incubation programme, the company secured $500k to expand distribution of their pepperoni, deli slices and pâté in the US. Investors were apparently seduced by the economic potential of creating meat products at prices lower than traditionally farmed meat. But, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the team has since adapted their strategy and will now be looking to launch in the EU before the end of the year.

The second week’s vote saw five vegan contenders battle it out for the top spot. It’s not hard to guess which famous Italian cheese Willicroft’s This is not Parmesan is standing in for. Founder Brad Vanstone, grandson of a dairy farmer who went plant-based for the planet, recognized that cheese was often the final hurdle when it came to enjoying a vegan diet. So, he created his own – and before long, his hobby turned into a business. Despite his products’ early success, Brad is aware of the criticism around cashew nut based cheeses and is looking to switch to a more locally grown alternative in the longer term.

And just as Brad was cooking up his cheese, the Switzerland-based team behind VAYO was founding Connie’s Kitchen. VAYO is a plant-based mayonnaise made from rescued linseed flour instead of eggs that came in third when featured on the Discovery board. The product’s launch in June marked the team’s expansion from ketchup to the healthier condiments category. In addition to its core vegan credentials, their marketing messages pay equal attention to personal and planetary health as well as the creaminess of the product itself. Judging by their growing online community of supporters, this has proved to be a winning combination for their target market of future-focused parents.

Beyond ticking boxes: measuring impact and shifting supply

While the growth of vegan, veggie and flexitarian communities is encouraging more start-ups to set up shop in this area, the wider range of products available is also making it easier for consumers who are still sitting on the fence to make the switch.

But canny entrepreneurs will not forget that a vegan product isn’t automatically healthier or more sustainable. New brands need to think carefully about their ingredient sourcing, production methods and how they measure and communicate their impact to win over increasingly savvy consumers.

A key part of this will be considering how system-wide shifts affect local food systems – not just on an environmental but also on a human level. In a crowded marketplace, the story of the company that supports local farmers to shift supply, rather than just responding to demand, may just be that extra dollop of vegan mayonnaise that convinces customers to buy their juicy plant-based burgers.

Business opportunities

  • Want to extend the reach of your product? Market beyond vegan alone. Highlight the health-focused, functional benefits of your alternative product to attract occasional plant-based eaters and flexitarians as well as ethically minded vegans and veggies.  

  • Eager to attract plant-based diners? Commit to plant-based options. Offering a bowl of fresh veggies alongside your more creative meat-based dishes is no longer going to cut it for the majority of vegan and veggie consumers. Consider how you use the latest alternative products to create truly tongue-tantalizing versions of your bestsellers.

  • Looking to create a new vegan product? Try playing into the allergies and clean eating markets by creating a healthy, oil-free vegan sauce or dressing to spice up buddha bowls, salads or wraps in restaurants or at home. Or develop a brand that creates more consumer choice in the growing plant-based dairy, fish, meats or eggs categories.