Sidestepping the sweet stuff: the latest trends in sugar reduction & substitutes

Sidestepping the sweet stuff: the latest trends in sugar reduction & substitutes

By
Louise Burfitt
March 8, 2021

🍰 Sugar substitute: what is it?

  • Sugar: everyone’s favourite unhealthy habit. Most of us can’t get enough of the sweet stuff, even though we know it ruins our teeth, expands our waistlines and contributes to diabetes and is now proven to be a risk factor for severe COVID-19 complications.
  • As a result, consumers are keener than ever to swap sugar for healthier alternatives without compromising on taste and indulgence. Some startups investigating novel sugar substitutes are asking if, perhaps, we might be able to have our cake and eat it too...

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Over 422 million people globally suffer from diabetes, and recent decades have seen a marked increase in type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity and an unhealthy diet.
  • As a result, health-conscious consumers and governments are shifting away from sugar. And companies are dreaming up innovative new creations to sate customer appetite for the sweet stuff - but without the unwelcome health risks.

💡 How did it start? 

  • Sugar substitutes have a long history: saccharin was first discovered more than 100 years ago and has long been used as an alternative to sugar in foods. 
  • Over the years, it’s been joined by other artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, sucralose and stevia. And that’s not to mention the wealth of low-sugar food products on the market, too. 

🤷‍♂️Why

  • Consumers now have increased awareness of sugar’s health risks, only hastened by COVID-19 studies that make clear the links between obesity and the novel coronavirus. 
  • These health-conscious shoppers are searching for nutritious snacks low in or free from sugar that still taste good - and indulgent - but do away with the risks to their health.
  • Governments, particularly in richer countries, are regulating on the sweet stuff with sugar taxes. Many European countries have an increasingly strict regulatory environment around sugar, forcing food brands big and small to react.

🔬 How is it shaping up?

  • Now some innovators are branching out from sweeteners and low-sugar diets with high-tech sugar substitutes and reduction solutions - from redesigned sugar crystals, to sweet-tasting designer proteins, to slow-release sugary snacks
  • Others aren’t saying goodbye to sweeteners just yet - instead they’re on the hunt for new plant-based sweeteners or ‘natural’ solutions, as hesitancy around artificial sweeteners like aspartame grows among consumers.
  • Novel sweeteners include allulose, a natural substance found in figs and raisins, and monk fruit. Swedish ice-cream company Nick’s is an example of a company using both in its sugar-free ice cream.
  • And it’s not just startups: the big players are getting in on the trend, too. Nestlé, Kellogg and Coca Cola have all utilised the natural sweetness of monk fruit in novel products while heritage sugar brand Tate & Lyle are exploring the possibilities of allulose.
  • Elsewhere, other companies are focusing on foods that act on blood sugar levels - there’s Good Idea’s blood sugar-balancing drinks and Aurora Foods, based in food tech hub Singapore, with their slow-sugar release snacks. 
  • Europe currently tops the charts for the most food and drink launches with low or no added sugar labelling.

👀 Who? (24 companies in this space)

 

📈 The figures

  • Consumers are eager to reduce sugar in their diets: 70% of Americans are worried about the sugar in their diets, UK shoppers say sugar content is the most important factor in eating healthily and many Europeans are seeking to avoid added sugar in the foods they consume.
  • As a result, the global sugar-free food and beverage market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 9.36% between 2020 and 2027. And the sugar substitutes market is expected to be worth $22.3 billion by 2027.

🥤Case study: Good Idea Drinks 

  • Meet Good Idea Drinks, a Swedish startup set up by Björn Öste, one of the co-founders of Oatly. 
  • The company has designed functional flavoured sparkling waters that claim to reduce blood sugar spikes after meals.
  • After 10 years of intense scientific research, the flavoured drinks are made with a recipe containing five amino acids and chromium to reduce the spike in blood sugar that follows a meal by 25% on average
  • The beverages, which come in three flavours, are also all natural, free from sweeteners and added sugar, and contain zero calories. 
  • Good Idea recommends drinking their tipples during or after a meal to get the best benefits - which include feeling less tired after eating a big meal and avoiding those sugar cravings that sometimes appear after dinner. 
  • And though the startup hasn’t tested their blood sugar claims on people with diabetes yet, the company is keen to research this area further.

Source: Good Idea Drinks

🍬 Case study: DouxMatok

  • DouxMatok, meanwhile, has come up with a special solution to reduce sugar in products by 40% – by redesigning the sugar crystal itself.
  • The Israeli start-up has called its rebranded sugar Incredo and as it’s made with real cane sugar, the taste profile remains the same as real sugar in products it’s used in.
  • In fact, in blind tastings, more than two-thirds of consumers said they preferred the biscuits made with Incredo sugar to those made with full sugar. 
  • DouxMatok’s redesigned sugar crystal works because it allows sugar to be delivered to the taste receptors in our bodies more efficiently. Our brains interpret this as a higher level of sugar in the food - so there’s no sacrificing that delicious sweet taste.
  • In 2020, the company partnered with Canadian sugar company Rogers & Lantic Sugar to produce and distribute its rebranded sugar product. 
  • DouxMatok’s sugar is already on shelves at the Israeli bakery chain Piece of Cake in the form of freshly baked cookies. 
  • The company is now working with food companies around the world to develop new Incredo-sugar versions of cookies, cake, spreads and sweets.

Source: DouxMatok

👍The good

  • Sugar solutions and substitutes first and foremost contribute to better health for consumers – leading to lower levels of obesity, diabetes, tooth decay and more. 
  • The wealth of options on the market, or soon to be launched, is great news for health-conscious consumers who already have a far greater array of choices for low- and no-sugar than they did even five years ago. 
  • Many startups in the space are focusing not just on sweet flavours, but on adding more complex tastes to their products to increase consumer acceptance and satiety. 
  • Baked goods, candies, juices and similar sweet treats are set to benefit  from new innovations in sugar reduction. Natural sweeteners and new innovations will allow food entrepreneurs to continue to provide consumers with the indulgences they love, and are likely to draw in millennials who have been found to prefer natural, plant-based alternatives to sugar.

👎 The bad

  • Little is known about the long-term health effects of novel sweeteners. The newer the invention, the less evidence exists. Only time analysis will tell us just how safe and effective these new inventions are. 
  • Labelling low-sugar and no-sugar food items can be a transparency minefield. And consumers are keen to see clearer labelling on products containing sweeteners, for example.
  • The same is true of regulation – novel sweeteners and redesigned sugars will need to be approved by respective governments. For example, the EU is yet to rubber-stamp monk fruit as a sweetener - though approval is expected imminently.

💡The bottom line

  • Competition to reduce sugar in food products is fierce, and the sector is currently undergoing huge innovation with exciting outcomes for manufacturers and consumers alike. 
  • Some companies are using natural sweeteners, while others are modifying the very structure of the sugar molecules. Time will tell which method proves most cost-effective and acceptable to consumers in the long run.

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🍰 Sugar substitute: what is it?

  • Sugar: everyone’s favourite unhealthy habit. Most of us can’t get enough of the sweet stuff, even though we know it ruins our teeth, expands our waistlines and contributes to diabetes and is now proven to be a risk factor for severe COVID-19 complications.
  • As a result, consumers are keener than ever to swap sugar for healthier alternatives without compromising on taste and indulgence. Some startups investigating novel sugar substitutes are asking if, perhaps, we might be able to have our cake and eat it too...

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Over 422 million people globally suffer from diabetes, and recent decades have seen a marked increase in type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity and an unhealthy diet.
  • As a result, health-conscious consumers and governments are shifting away from sugar. And companies are dreaming up innovative new creations to sate customer appetite for the sweet stuff - but without the unwelcome health risks.

💡 How did it start? 

  • Sugar substitutes have a long history: saccharin was first discovered more than 100 years ago and has long been used as an alternative to sugar in foods. 
  • Over the years, it’s been joined by other artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, sucralose and stevia. And that’s not to mention the wealth of low-sugar food products on the market, too. 

🤷‍♂️Why

  • Consumers now have increased awareness of sugar’s health risks, only hastened by COVID-19 studies that make clear the links between obesity and the novel coronavirus. 
  • These health-conscious shoppers are searching for nutritious snacks low in or free from sugar that still taste good - and indulgent - but do away with the risks to their health.
  • Governments, particularly in richer countries, are regulating on the sweet stuff with sugar taxes. Many European countries have an increasingly strict regulatory environment around sugar, forcing food brands big and small to react.

🔬 How is it shaping up?

  • Now some innovators are branching out from sweeteners and low-sugar diets with high-tech sugar substitutes and reduction solutions - from redesigned sugar crystals, to sweet-tasting designer proteins, to slow-release sugary snacks
  • Others aren’t saying goodbye to sweeteners just yet - instead they’re on the hunt for new plant-based sweeteners or ‘natural’ solutions, as hesitancy around artificial sweeteners like aspartame grows among consumers.
  • Novel sweeteners include allulose, a natural substance found in figs and raisins, and monk fruit. Swedish ice-cream company Nick’s is an example of a company using both in its sugar-free ice cream.
  • And it’s not just startups: the big players are getting in on the trend, too. Nestlé, Kellogg and Coca Cola have all utilised the natural sweetness of monk fruit in novel products while heritage sugar brand Tate & Lyle are exploring the possibilities of allulose.
  • Elsewhere, other companies are focusing on foods that act on blood sugar levels - there’s Good Idea’s blood sugar-balancing drinks and Aurora Foods, based in food tech hub Singapore, with their slow-sugar release snacks. 
  • Europe currently tops the charts for the most food and drink launches with low or no added sugar labelling.

👀 Who? (24 companies in this space)

 

📈 The figures

  • Consumers are eager to reduce sugar in their diets: 70% of Americans are worried about the sugar in their diets, UK shoppers say sugar content is the most important factor in eating healthily and many Europeans are seeking to avoid added sugar in the foods they consume.
  • As a result, the global sugar-free food and beverage market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 9.36% between 2020 and 2027. And the sugar substitutes market is expected to be worth $22.3 billion by 2027.

🥤Case study: Good Idea Drinks 

  • Meet Good Idea Drinks, a Swedish startup set up by Björn Öste, one of the co-founders of Oatly. 
  • The company has designed functional flavoured sparkling waters that claim to reduce blood sugar spikes after meals.
  • After 10 years of intense scientific research, the flavoured drinks are made with a recipe containing five amino acids and chromium to reduce the spike in blood sugar that follows a meal by 25% on average
  • The beverages, which come in three flavours, are also all natural, free from sweeteners and added sugar, and contain zero calories. 
  • Good Idea recommends drinking their tipples during or after a meal to get the best benefits - which include feeling less tired after eating a big meal and avoiding those sugar cravings that sometimes appear after dinner. 
  • And though the startup hasn’t tested their blood sugar claims on people with diabetes yet, the company is keen to research this area further.

Source: Good Idea Drinks

🍬 Case study: DouxMatok

  • DouxMatok, meanwhile, has come up with a special solution to reduce sugar in products by 40% – by redesigning the sugar crystal itself.
  • The Israeli start-up has called its rebranded sugar Incredo and as it’s made with real cane sugar, the taste profile remains the same as real sugar in products it’s used in.
  • In fact, in blind tastings, more than two-thirds of consumers said they preferred the biscuits made with Incredo sugar to those made with full sugar. 
  • DouxMatok’s redesigned sugar crystal works because it allows sugar to be delivered to the taste receptors in our bodies more efficiently. Our brains interpret this as a higher level of sugar in the food - so there’s no sacrificing that delicious sweet taste.
  • In 2020, the company partnered with Canadian sugar company Rogers & Lantic Sugar to produce and distribute its rebranded sugar product. 
  • DouxMatok’s sugar is already on shelves at the Israeli bakery chain Piece of Cake in the form of freshly baked cookies. 
  • The company is now working with food companies around the world to develop new Incredo-sugar versions of cookies, cake, spreads and sweets.

Source: DouxMatok

👍The good

  • Sugar solutions and substitutes first and foremost contribute to better health for consumers – leading to lower levels of obesity, diabetes, tooth decay and more. 
  • The wealth of options on the market, or soon to be launched, is great news for health-conscious consumers who already have a far greater array of choices for low- and no-sugar than they did even five years ago. 
  • Many startups in the space are focusing not just on sweet flavours, but on adding more complex tastes to their products to increase consumer acceptance and satiety. 
  • Baked goods, candies, juices and similar sweet treats are set to benefit  from new innovations in sugar reduction. Natural sweeteners and new innovations will allow food entrepreneurs to continue to provide consumers with the indulgences they love, and are likely to draw in millennials who have been found to prefer natural, plant-based alternatives to sugar.

👎 The bad

  • Little is known about the long-term health effects of novel sweeteners. The newer the invention, the less evidence exists. Only time analysis will tell us just how safe and effective these new inventions are. 
  • Labelling low-sugar and no-sugar food items can be a transparency minefield. And consumers are keen to see clearer labelling on products containing sweeteners, for example.
  • The same is true of regulation – novel sweeteners and redesigned sugars will need to be approved by respective governments. For example, the EU is yet to rubber-stamp monk fruit as a sweetener - though approval is expected imminently.

💡The bottom line

  • Competition to reduce sugar in food products is fierce, and the sector is currently undergoing huge innovation with exciting outcomes for manufacturers and consumers alike. 
  • Some companies are using natural sweeteners, while others are modifying the very structure of the sugar molecules. Time will tell which method proves most cost-effective and acceptable to consumers in the long run.

🍰 Sugar substitute: what is it?

  • Sugar: everyone’s favourite unhealthy habit. Most of us can’t get enough of the sweet stuff, even though we know it ruins our teeth, expands our waistlines and contributes to diabetes and is now proven to be a risk factor for severe COVID-19 complications.
  • As a result, consumers are keener than ever to swap sugar for healthier alternatives without compromising on taste and indulgence. Some startups investigating novel sugar substitutes are asking if, perhaps, we might be able to have our cake and eat it too...

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Over 422 million people globally suffer from diabetes, and recent decades have seen a marked increase in type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity and an unhealthy diet.
  • As a result, health-conscious consumers and governments are shifting away from sugar. And companies are dreaming up innovative new creations to sate customer appetite for the sweet stuff - but without the unwelcome health risks.

💡 How did it start? 

  • Sugar substitutes have a long history: saccharin was first discovered more than 100 years ago and has long been used as an alternative to sugar in foods. 
  • Over the years, it’s been joined by other artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, sucralose and stevia. And that’s not to mention the wealth of low-sugar food products on the market, too. 

🤷‍♂️Why

  • Consumers now have increased awareness of sugar’s health risks, only hastened by COVID-19 studies that make clear the links between obesity and the novel coronavirus. 
  • These health-conscious shoppers are searching for nutritious snacks low in or free from sugar that still taste good - and indulgent - but do away with the risks to their health.
  • Governments, particularly in richer countries, are regulating on the sweet stuff with sugar taxes. Many European countries have an increasingly strict regulatory environment around sugar, forcing food brands big and small to react.

🔬 How is it shaping up?

  • Now some innovators are branching out from sweeteners and low-sugar diets with high-tech sugar substitutes and reduction solutions - from redesigned sugar crystals, to sweet-tasting designer proteins, to slow-release sugary snacks
  • Others aren’t saying goodbye to sweeteners just yet - instead they’re on the hunt for new plant-based sweeteners or ‘natural’ solutions, as hesitancy around artificial sweeteners like aspartame grows among consumers.
  • Novel sweeteners include allulose, a natural substance found in figs and raisins, and monk fruit. Swedish ice-cream company Nick’s is an example of a company using both in its sugar-free ice cream.
  • And it’s not just startups: the big players are getting in on the trend, too. Nestlé, Kellogg and Coca Cola have all utilised the natural sweetness of monk fruit in novel products while heritage sugar brand Tate & Lyle are exploring the possibilities of allulose.
  • Elsewhere, other companies are focusing on foods that act on blood sugar levels - there’s Good Idea’s blood sugar-balancing drinks and Aurora Foods, based in food tech hub Singapore, with their slow-sugar release snacks. 
  • Europe currently tops the charts for the most food and drink launches with low or no added sugar labelling.

👀 Who? (24 companies in this space)

 

📈 The figures

  • Consumers are eager to reduce sugar in their diets: 70% of Americans are worried about the sugar in their diets, UK shoppers say sugar content is the most important factor in eating healthily and many Europeans are seeking to avoid added sugar in the foods they consume.
  • As a result, the global sugar-free food and beverage market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 9.36% between 2020 and 2027. And the sugar substitutes market is expected to be worth $22.3 billion by 2027.

🥤Case study: Good Idea Drinks 

  • Meet Good Idea Drinks, a Swedish startup set up by Björn Öste, one of the co-founders of Oatly. 
  • The company has designed functional flavoured sparkling waters that claim to reduce blood sugar spikes after meals.
  • After 10 years of intense scientific research, the flavoured drinks are made with a recipe containing five amino acids and chromium to reduce the spike in blood sugar that follows a meal by 25% on average
  • The beverages, which come in three flavours, are also all natural, free from sweeteners and added sugar, and contain zero calories. 
  • Good Idea recommends drinking their tipples during or after a meal to get the best benefits - which include feeling less tired after eating a big meal and avoiding those sugar cravings that sometimes appear after dinner. 
  • And though the startup hasn’t tested their blood sugar claims on people with diabetes yet, the company is keen to research this area further.

Source: Good Idea Drinks

🍬 Case study: DouxMatok

  • DouxMatok, meanwhile, has come up with a special solution to reduce sugar in products by 40% – by redesigning the sugar crystal itself.
  • The Israeli start-up has called its rebranded sugar Incredo and as it’s made with real cane sugar, the taste profile remains the same as real sugar in products it’s used in.
  • In fact, in blind tastings, more than two-thirds of consumers said they preferred the biscuits made with Incredo sugar to those made with full sugar. 
  • DouxMatok’s redesigned sugar crystal works because it allows sugar to be delivered to the taste receptors in our bodies more efficiently. Our brains interpret this as a higher level of sugar in the food - so there’s no sacrificing that delicious sweet taste.
  • In 2020, the company partnered with Canadian sugar company Rogers & Lantic Sugar to produce and distribute its rebranded sugar product. 
  • DouxMatok’s sugar is already on shelves at the Israeli bakery chain Piece of Cake in the form of freshly baked cookies. 
  • The company is now working with food companies around the world to develop new Incredo-sugar versions of cookies, cake, spreads and sweets.

Source: DouxMatok

👍The good

  • Sugar solutions and substitutes first and foremost contribute to better health for consumers – leading to lower levels of obesity, diabetes, tooth decay and more. 
  • The wealth of options on the market, or soon to be launched, is great news for health-conscious consumers who already have a far greater array of choices for low- and no-sugar than they did even five years ago. 
  • Many startups in the space are focusing not just on sweet flavours, but on adding more complex tastes to their products to increase consumer acceptance and satiety. 
  • Baked goods, candies, juices and similar sweet treats are set to benefit  from new innovations in sugar reduction. Natural sweeteners and new innovations will allow food entrepreneurs to continue to provide consumers with the indulgences they love, and are likely to draw in millennials who have been found to prefer natural, plant-based alternatives to sugar.

👎 The bad

  • Little is known about the long-term health effects of novel sweeteners. The newer the invention, the less evidence exists. Only time analysis will tell us just how safe and effective these new inventions are. 
  • Labelling low-sugar and no-sugar food items can be a transparency minefield. And consumers are keen to see clearer labelling on products containing sweeteners, for example.
  • The same is true of regulation – novel sweeteners and redesigned sugars will need to be approved by respective governments. For example, the EU is yet to rubber-stamp monk fruit as a sweetener - though approval is expected imminently.

💡The bottom line

  • Competition to reduce sugar in food products is fierce, and the sector is currently undergoing huge innovation with exciting outcomes for manufacturers and consumers alike. 
  • Some companies are using natural sweeteners, while others are modifying the very structure of the sugar molecules. Time will tell which method proves most cost-effective and acceptable to consumers in the long run.

🍰 Sugar substitute: what is it?

  • Sugar: everyone’s favourite unhealthy habit. Most of us can’t get enough of the sweet stuff, even though we know it ruins our teeth, expands our waistlines and contributes to diabetes and is now proven to be a risk factor for severe COVID-19 complications.
  • As a result, consumers are keener than ever to swap sugar for healthier alternatives without compromising on taste and indulgence. Some startups investigating novel sugar substitutes are asking if, perhaps, we might be able to have our cake and eat it too...

🤔 Tell me more…

  • Over 422 million people globally suffer from diabetes, and recent decades have seen a marked increase in type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity and an unhealthy diet.
  • As a result, health-conscious consumers and governments are shifting away from sugar. And companies are dreaming up innovative new creations to sate customer appetite for the sweet stuff - but without the unwelcome health risks.

💡 How did it start? 

  • Sugar substitutes have a long history: saccharin was first discovered more than 100 years ago and has long been used as an alternative to sugar in foods. 
  • Over the years, it’s been joined by other artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, sucralose and stevia. And that’s not to mention the wealth of low-sugar food products on the market, too. 

🤷‍♂️Why

  • Consumers now have increased awareness of sugar’s health risks, only hastened by COVID-19 studies that make clear the links between obesity and the novel coronavirus. 
  • These health-conscious shoppers are searching for nutritious snacks low in or free from sugar that still taste good - and indulgent - but do away with the risks to their health.
  • Governments, particularly in richer countries, are regulating on the sweet stuff with sugar taxes. Many European countries have an increasingly strict regulatory environment around sugar, forcing food brands big and small to react.

🔬 How is it shaping up?

  • Now some innovators are branching out from sweeteners and low-sugar diets with high-tech sugar substitutes and reduction solutions - from redesigned sugar crystals, to sweet-tasting designer proteins, to slow-release sugary snacks
  • Others aren’t saying goodbye to sweeteners just yet - instead they’re on the hunt for new plant-based sweeteners or ‘natural’ solutions, as hesitancy around artificial sweeteners like aspartame grows among consumers.
  • Novel sweeteners include allulose, a natural substance found in figs and raisins, and monk fruit. Swedish ice-cream company Nick’s is an example of a company using both in its sugar-free ice cream.
  • And it’s not just startups: the big players are getting in on the trend, too. Nestlé, Kellogg and Coca Cola have all utilised the natural sweetness of monk fruit in novel products while heritage sugar brand Tate & Lyle are exploring the possibilities of allulose.
  • Elsewhere, other companies are focusing on foods that act on blood sugar levels - there’s Good Idea’s blood sugar-balancing drinks and Aurora Foods, based in food tech hub Singapore, with their slow-sugar release snacks. 
  • Europe currently tops the charts for the most food and drink launches with low or no added sugar labelling.

👀 Who? (24 companies in this space)

 

📈 The figures

  • Consumers are eager to reduce sugar in their diets: 70% of Americans are worried about the sugar in their diets, UK shoppers say sugar content is the most important factor in eating healthily and many Europeans are seeking to avoid added sugar in the foods they consume.
  • As a result, the global sugar-free food and beverage market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 9.36% between 2020 and 2027. And the sugar substitutes market is expected to be worth $22.3 billion by 2027.

🥤Case study: Good Idea Drinks 

  • Meet Good Idea Drinks, a Swedish startup set up by Björn Öste, one of the co-founders of Oatly. 
  • The company has designed functional flavoured sparkling waters that claim to reduce blood sugar spikes after meals.
  • After 10 years of intense scientific research, the flavoured drinks are made with a recipe containing five amino acids and chromium to reduce the spike in blood sugar that follows a meal by 25% on average
  • The beverages, which come in three flavours, are also all natural, free from sweeteners and added sugar, and contain zero calories. 
  • Good Idea recommends drinking their tipples during or after a meal to get the best benefits - which include feeling less tired after eating a big meal and avoiding those sugar cravings that sometimes appear after dinner. 
  • And though the startup hasn’t tested their blood sugar claims on people with diabetes yet, the company is keen to research this area further.

Source: Good Idea Drinks

🍬 Case study: DouxMatok

  • DouxMatok, meanwhile, has come up with a special solution to reduce sugar in products by 40% – by redesigning the sugar crystal itself.
  • The Israeli start-up has called its rebranded sugar Incredo and as it’s made with real cane sugar, the taste profile remains the same as real sugar in products it’s used in.
  • In fact, in blind tastings, more than two-thirds of consumers said they preferred the biscuits made with Incredo sugar to those made with full sugar. 
  • DouxMatok’s redesigned sugar crystal works because it allows sugar to be delivered to the taste receptors in our bodies more efficiently. Our brains interpret this as a higher level of sugar in the food - so there’s no sacrificing that delicious sweet taste.
  • In 2020, the company partnered with Canadian sugar company Rogers & Lantic Sugar to produce and distribute its rebranded sugar product. 
  • DouxMatok’s sugar is already on shelves at the Israeli bakery chain Piece of Cake in the form of freshly baked cookies. 
  • The company is now working with food companies around the world to develop new Incredo-sugar versions of cookies, cake, spreads and sweets.

Source: DouxMatok

👍The good

  • Sugar solutions and substitutes first and foremost contribute to better health for consumers – leading to lower levels of obesity, diabetes, tooth decay and more. 
  • The wealth of options on the market, or soon to be launched, is great news for health-conscious consumers who already have a far greater array of choices for low- and no-sugar than they did even five years ago. 
  • Many startups in the space are focusing not just on sweet flavours, but on adding more complex tastes to their products to increase consumer acceptance and satiety. 
  • Baked goods, candies, juices and similar sweet treats are set to benefit  from new innovations in sugar reduction. Natural sweeteners and new innovations will allow food entrepreneurs to continue to provide consumers with the indulgences they love, and are likely to draw in millennials who have been found to prefer natural, plant-based alternatives to sugar.

👎 The bad

  • Little is known about the long-term health effects of novel sweeteners. The newer the invention, the less evidence exists. Only time analysis will tell us just how safe and effective these new inventions are. 
  • Labelling low-sugar and no-sugar food items can be a transparency minefield. And consumers are keen to see clearer labelling on products containing sweeteners, for example.
  • The same is true of regulation – novel sweeteners and redesigned sugars will need to be approved by respective governments. For example, the EU is yet to rubber-stamp monk fruit as a sweetener - though approval is expected imminently.

💡The bottom line

  • Competition to reduce sugar in food products is fierce, and the sector is currently undergoing huge innovation with exciting outcomes for manufacturers and consumers alike. 
  • Some companies are using natural sweeteners, while others are modifying the very structure of the sugar molecules. Time will tell which method proves most cost-effective and acceptable to consumers in the long run.

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