Something Fungi 🍄 From tacos to textiles - discover 60+ fungi startups & companies using mushroom & mycelium.

Something Fungi 🍄 From tacos to textiles - discover 60+ fungi startups & companies using mushroom & mycelium.

By
Arman Anatürk
April 19, 2021

Mushrooms are the talk of the foodtech world these days. You’d be hard pressed to go a week without seeing the words ‘fungi’ or ‘mycelium’ on your feed from some future foodtech investor or self-declared expert

But what and who is driving the growth in this space? And are chestnut mushrooms really the same as portobellos? (spoiler: Yes, just smaller)

To ensure your mushroom knowledge is up to par, we’ve dug down into the roots - or the mycelium - to find out more. A fair warning: there’s at least two more mushroom puns to come. 

🍄 Mushrooms moving mainstream  

Across the globe we’re seeing interest in mushrooms grow - from a new wave of fungi entrepreneurs creating everything from textiles to tacos, to a growing generation of hobbyists foraging our forests for the latest fungal finds.

Consumers, entrepreneurs, VC’s and even my mum - are all falling in love with fungi and its many, many possibilities.

We've gathered 60+ more fungi startups and companies you should know about (Free to access)

📚A brief background:

  • Scientists believe there are 45,000+ species of mushroom in the world. But, according to the FAO and EUROSTAT, button mushrooms account for more than 50% of global mushroom production.
  • The rarest edible mushroom is the white truffle. In fact, European white truffles are so rare that they come with a hefty price tag: around €2,200 per pound.
  • Mushrooms are a rich, low calorie source of protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals.
  • Mushrooms are relatively easy to grow and can be done in small spaces (i.e. in a quiet corner of your living room).
  • Functional or adaptogenic mushrooms were popularised by brands like Mud/Wtr and Four Sigmatic and can allegedly help the body to manage stress, reduce the signs of ageing and power up your sense of wellbeing.
  • The most common functional species are lion's mane, chaga, reishi, turkey tail, and shiitake.
  • There are many varieties of mushrooms used in cooking - from the dependable crimini to meaty morels. 
  • The Asia-Pacific region has a leading position in the global mushroom market with 82.54%. Mushrooms are particularly popular in China, Korea, and Japan. 

📈 Why are mushrooms a hot topic in FoodTech?

  • The global plant-based meat market is projected to reach $8.5B by 2025. Fungi-based protein could be the future of vegan meat.
  • Mushrooms & mycelium make for great meat-alternatives due to their versatility as well as their meat-like heft and texture, meaning they can be used to make any manner of meat or seafood substitutes.
  • Fungi tend to only require a small amount of land, energy and water to produce. 
  • Mushrooms offer something for everyone. Whether you’re vegan, vegetarian, paleo, low-carb or kosher.
  • Consumers are also buying into the adaptogenic qualities of functional mushrooms, and the market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 8.04% from 2020 to 2025.

💡 Popular fungi terminology includes: 

  • Mycelium - a filamentous, protein-rich ingredient extracted from the root structure of mushrooms. It’s a wonder material, we’ll come back to it shortly.
  • Hyphae - grow from spores of a fungal organism called a basidiomycete. As hyphae continue to grow, they fuse together to form mycelium. If environmental conditions are right, the mycelium will produce a mushroom, a.k.a. the fruiting body.

🤷 Not-so-popular fungi terminology includes:

  • Mycophile - a person who loves fungi.
  • Mycophobe - a person who fears or loathes fungi.
  • 60+ more terms here
Smallhold Farms

👀 Who - The fungi innovators:

  • Atlast Food Co. raised $40M last week to scale production of its whole cut meat alternatives. It uses mycelium to produce plant-based meat alternatives, and its first product, plant-based bacon, is made with just six ingredients.
  • Nature’s Fynd has raised $150M in equity and debt, and has opened pre-orders for its range of plant-based food products made with fungus from Yellowstone National Park.
  • Mycoworks raised $45M in November to scale up production of its mycelium-based animal-free leather, In fact, in March it teamed up with high-end French fashion brand Hermès to unveil a mushroom-based ‘leather’ travel bag, the very first bag created with its patented technology.
  • Smallhold raised $3.7M for their fungi farming technology company that provides automated, modular remotely-managed, and subscription-based growing systems.
  • Meati Foods landed $28M in November. Its specialty is fungi-based whole-cut meats, read Techrunch’s review here.
  • Prime Roots ($4.5M funding to date) launched a line of vegan-friendly ravioli in March, made with its Japanese fungus koji-based proteins.
  • Chinova Bioworks raised $2M in 2018 to harness the power of mushrooms and reduce food waste with a natural, clean-label shelf-life extender.
  • Mycotech Lab raised €71k in 2019 to turn waste into sustainable animal-free leather. It uses fermentation technology to make sustainable, mycelium-based materials.
  • Mycocycle, Inc. (no public round yet) is using mushrooms to remove toxins from waste, switching it from a burden to a reusable resource.
  • Forji (no public round yet) is making granola with functional mushrooms for all your breakfast wellbeing needs.

🔎 More: View all 60+ Fungi startups and companies here in our database. (FREE!)

FoodHack+ Fungi Database

🔮 Our predictions:

We’re only at the top of the filament when it comes to the mushroom market, and we foresee all kinds of magic happening: 

  • More food & beverage companies integrating ‘functional mushrooms’ into their products (i.e. mushroom-based fitness foods, coffee alternatives & supplements).
  • Increase in number of alternative protein startups utilising mushrooms (from whole cuts to ground meats and more).
  • Increased demand for mushrooms paving the way to more mushroom growers/farms around the world.
  • Major urban farms players start integrating mushrooms as part of their offer.
  • More spices and seasonings based on the unique umami flavour of mushrooms/more fermented seasonings made shio koji-style.
  • Consumers discovering the different flavours and textures of mushrooms - driving growth in restaurants dished and at home use.
  • Growth of mushroom-grow-kits sales and new opportunities (like subscription service and training) directed at the amateur grower. 
  • Retailers (and even restaurants) launch self-harvest options for customers.
  • Demand for sustainable fashion opening up new opportunities in material science and chemistry.
  • Mushroom agritourism becomes a thing. 

We wanted to go deeper into this space but we didn’t have mush room… Have a future fungi 🍄 prediction you’d like to share? Let us know

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Mushrooms are the talk of the foodtech world these days. You’d be hard pressed to go a week without seeing the words ‘fungi’ or ‘mycelium’ on your feed from some future foodtech investor or self-declared expert

But what and who is driving the growth in this space? And are chestnut mushrooms really the same as portobellos? (spoiler: Yes, just smaller)

To ensure your mushroom knowledge is up to par, we’ve dug down into the roots - or the mycelium - to find out more. A fair warning: there’s at least two more mushroom puns to come. 

🍄 Mushrooms moving mainstream  

Across the globe we’re seeing interest in mushrooms grow - from a new wave of fungi entrepreneurs creating everything from textiles to tacos, to a growing generation of hobbyists foraging our forests for the latest fungal finds.

Consumers, entrepreneurs, VC’s and even my mum - are all falling in love with fungi and its many, many possibilities.

We've gathered 60+ more fungi startups and companies you should know about (Free to access)

📚A brief background:

  • Scientists believe there are 45,000+ species of mushroom in the world. But, according to the FAO and EUROSTAT, button mushrooms account for more than 50% of global mushroom production.
  • The rarest edible mushroom is the white truffle. In fact, European white truffles are so rare that they come with a hefty price tag: around €2,200 per pound.
  • Mushrooms are a rich, low calorie source of protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals.
  • Mushrooms are relatively easy to grow and can be done in small spaces (i.e. in a quiet corner of your living room).
  • Functional or adaptogenic mushrooms were popularised by brands like Mud/Wtr and Four Sigmatic and can allegedly help the body to manage stress, reduce the signs of ageing and power up your sense of wellbeing.
  • The most common functional species are lion's mane, chaga, reishi, turkey tail, and shiitake.
  • There are many varieties of mushrooms used in cooking - from the dependable crimini to meaty morels. 
  • The Asia-Pacific region has a leading position in the global mushroom market with 82.54%. Mushrooms are particularly popular in China, Korea, and Japan. 

📈 Why are mushrooms a hot topic in FoodTech?

  • The global plant-based meat market is projected to reach $8.5B by 2025. Fungi-based protein could be the future of vegan meat.
  • Mushrooms & mycelium make for great meat-alternatives due to their versatility as well as their meat-like heft and texture, meaning they can be used to make any manner of meat or seafood substitutes.
  • Fungi tend to only require a small amount of land, energy and water to produce. 
  • Mushrooms offer something for everyone. Whether you’re vegan, vegetarian, paleo, low-carb or kosher.
  • Consumers are also buying into the adaptogenic qualities of functional mushrooms, and the market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 8.04% from 2020 to 2025.

💡 Popular fungi terminology includes: 

  • Mycelium - a filamentous, protein-rich ingredient extracted from the root structure of mushrooms. It’s a wonder material, we’ll come back to it shortly.
  • Hyphae - grow from spores of a fungal organism called a basidiomycete. As hyphae continue to grow, they fuse together to form mycelium. If environmental conditions are right, the mycelium will produce a mushroom, a.k.a. the fruiting body.

🤷 Not-so-popular fungi terminology includes:

  • Mycophile - a person who loves fungi.
  • Mycophobe - a person who fears or loathes fungi.
  • 60+ more terms here
Smallhold Farms

👀 Who - The fungi innovators:

  • Atlast Food Co. raised $40M last week to scale production of its whole cut meat alternatives. It uses mycelium to produce plant-based meat alternatives, and its first product, plant-based bacon, is made with just six ingredients.
  • Nature’s Fynd has raised $150M in equity and debt, and has opened pre-orders for its range of plant-based food products made with fungus from Yellowstone National Park.
  • Mycoworks raised $45M in November to scale up production of its mycelium-based animal-free leather, In fact, in March it teamed up with high-end French fashion brand Hermès to unveil a mushroom-based ‘leather’ travel bag, the very first bag created with its patented technology.
  • Smallhold raised $3.7M for their fungi farming technology company that provides automated, modular remotely-managed, and subscription-based growing systems.
  • Meati Foods landed $28M in November. Its specialty is fungi-based whole-cut meats, read Techrunch’s review here.
  • Prime Roots ($4.5M funding to date) launched a line of vegan-friendly ravioli in March, made with its Japanese fungus koji-based proteins.
  • Chinova Bioworks raised $2M in 2018 to harness the power of mushrooms and reduce food waste with a natural, clean-label shelf-life extender.
  • Mycotech Lab raised €71k in 2019 to turn waste into sustainable animal-free leather. It uses fermentation technology to make sustainable, mycelium-based materials.
  • Mycocycle, Inc. (no public round yet) is using mushrooms to remove toxins from waste, switching it from a burden to a reusable resource.
  • Forji (no public round yet) is making granola with functional mushrooms for all your breakfast wellbeing needs.

🔎 More: View all 60+ Fungi startups and companies here in our database. (FREE!)

FoodHack+ Fungi Database

🔮 Our predictions:

We’re only at the top of the filament when it comes to the mushroom market, and we foresee all kinds of magic happening: 

  • More food & beverage companies integrating ‘functional mushrooms’ into their products (i.e. mushroom-based fitness foods, coffee alternatives & supplements).
  • Increase in number of alternative protein startups utilising mushrooms (from whole cuts to ground meats and more).
  • Increased demand for mushrooms paving the way to more mushroom growers/farms around the world.
  • Major urban farms players start integrating mushrooms as part of their offer.
  • More spices and seasonings based on the unique umami flavour of mushrooms/more fermented seasonings made shio koji-style.
  • Consumers discovering the different flavours and textures of mushrooms - driving growth in restaurants dished and at home use.
  • Growth of mushroom-grow-kits sales and new opportunities (like subscription service and training) directed at the amateur grower. 
  • Retailers (and even restaurants) launch self-harvest options for customers.
  • Demand for sustainable fashion opening up new opportunities in material science and chemistry.
  • Mushroom agritourism becomes a thing. 

We wanted to go deeper into this space but we didn’t have mush room… Have a future fungi 🍄 prediction you’d like to share? Let us know

Mushrooms are the talk of the foodtech world these days. You’d be hard pressed to go a week without seeing the words ‘fungi’ or ‘mycelium’ on your feed from some future foodtech investor or self-declared expert

But what and who is driving the growth in this space? And are chestnut mushrooms really the same as portobellos? (spoiler: Yes, just smaller)

To ensure your mushroom knowledge is up to par, we’ve dug down into the roots - or the mycelium - to find out more. A fair warning: there’s at least two more mushroom puns to come. 

🍄 Mushrooms moving mainstream  

Across the globe we’re seeing interest in mushrooms grow - from a new wave of fungi entrepreneurs creating everything from textiles to tacos, to a growing generation of hobbyists foraging our forests for the latest fungal finds.

Consumers, entrepreneurs, VC’s and even my mum - are all falling in love with fungi and its many, many possibilities.

We've gathered 60+ more fungi startups and companies you should know about (Free to access)

📚A brief background:

  • Scientists believe there are 45,000+ species of mushroom in the world. But, according to the FAO and EUROSTAT, button mushrooms account for more than 50% of global mushroom production.
  • The rarest edible mushroom is the white truffle. In fact, European white truffles are so rare that they come with a hefty price tag: around €2,200 per pound.
  • Mushrooms are a rich, low calorie source of protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals.
  • Mushrooms are relatively easy to grow and can be done in small spaces (i.e. in a quiet corner of your living room).
  • Functional or adaptogenic mushrooms were popularised by brands like Mud/Wtr and Four Sigmatic and can allegedly help the body to manage stress, reduce the signs of ageing and power up your sense of wellbeing.
  • The most common functional species are lion's mane, chaga, reishi, turkey tail, and shiitake.
  • There are many varieties of mushrooms used in cooking - from the dependable crimini to meaty morels. 
  • The Asia-Pacific region has a leading position in the global mushroom market with 82.54%. Mushrooms are particularly popular in China, Korea, and Japan. 

📈 Why are mushrooms a hot topic in FoodTech?

  • The global plant-based meat market is projected to reach $8.5B by 2025. Fungi-based protein could be the future of vegan meat.
  • Mushrooms & mycelium make for great meat-alternatives due to their versatility as well as their meat-like heft and texture, meaning they can be used to make any manner of meat or seafood substitutes.
  • Fungi tend to only require a small amount of land, energy and water to produce. 
  • Mushrooms offer something for everyone. Whether you’re vegan, vegetarian, paleo, low-carb or kosher.
  • Consumers are also buying into the adaptogenic qualities of functional mushrooms, and the market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 8.04% from 2020 to 2025.

💡 Popular fungi terminology includes: 

  • Mycelium - a filamentous, protein-rich ingredient extracted from the root structure of mushrooms. It’s a wonder material, we’ll come back to it shortly.
  • Hyphae - grow from spores of a fungal organism called a basidiomycete. As hyphae continue to grow, they fuse together to form mycelium. If environmental conditions are right, the mycelium will produce a mushroom, a.k.a. the fruiting body.

🤷 Not-so-popular fungi terminology includes:

  • Mycophile - a person who loves fungi.
  • Mycophobe - a person who fears or loathes fungi.
  • 60+ more terms here
Smallhold Farms

👀 Who - The fungi innovators:

  • Atlast Food Co. raised $40M last week to scale production of its whole cut meat alternatives. It uses mycelium to produce plant-based meat alternatives, and its first product, plant-based bacon, is made with just six ingredients.
  • Nature’s Fynd has raised $150M in equity and debt, and has opened pre-orders for its range of plant-based food products made with fungus from Yellowstone National Park.
  • Mycoworks raised $45M in November to scale up production of its mycelium-based animal-free leather, In fact, in March it teamed up with high-end French fashion brand Hermès to unveil a mushroom-based ‘leather’ travel bag, the very first bag created with its patented technology.
  • Smallhold raised $3.7M for their fungi farming technology company that provides automated, modular remotely-managed, and subscription-based growing systems.
  • Meati Foods landed $28M in November. Its specialty is fungi-based whole-cut meats, read Techrunch’s review here.
  • Prime Roots ($4.5M funding to date) launched a line of vegan-friendly ravioli in March, made with its Japanese fungus koji-based proteins.
  • Chinova Bioworks raised $2M in 2018 to harness the power of mushrooms and reduce food waste with a natural, clean-label shelf-life extender.
  • Mycotech Lab raised €71k in 2019 to turn waste into sustainable animal-free leather. It uses fermentation technology to make sustainable, mycelium-based materials.
  • Mycocycle, Inc. (no public round yet) is using mushrooms to remove toxins from waste, switching it from a burden to a reusable resource.
  • Forji (no public round yet) is making granola with functional mushrooms for all your breakfast wellbeing needs.

🔎 More: View all 60+ Fungi startups and companies here in our database. (FREE!)

FoodHack+ Fungi Database

🔮 Our predictions:

We’re only at the top of the filament when it comes to the mushroom market, and we foresee all kinds of magic happening: 

  • More food & beverage companies integrating ‘functional mushrooms’ into their products (i.e. mushroom-based fitness foods, coffee alternatives & supplements).
  • Increase in number of alternative protein startups utilising mushrooms (from whole cuts to ground meats and more).
  • Increased demand for mushrooms paving the way to more mushroom growers/farms around the world.
  • Major urban farms players start integrating mushrooms as part of their offer.
  • More spices and seasonings based on the unique umami flavour of mushrooms/more fermented seasonings made shio koji-style.
  • Consumers discovering the different flavours and textures of mushrooms - driving growth in restaurants dished and at home use.
  • Growth of mushroom-grow-kits sales and new opportunities (like subscription service and training) directed at the amateur grower. 
  • Retailers (and even restaurants) launch self-harvest options for customers.
  • Demand for sustainable fashion opening up new opportunities in material science and chemistry.
  • Mushroom agritourism becomes a thing. 

We wanted to go deeper into this space but we didn’t have mush room… Have a future fungi 🍄 prediction you’d like to share? Let us know

Mushrooms are the talk of the foodtech world these days. You’d be hard pressed to go a week without seeing the words ‘fungi’ or ‘mycelium’ on your feed from some future foodtech investor or self-declared expert

But what and who is driving the growth in this space? And are chestnut mushrooms really the same as portobellos? (spoiler: Yes, just smaller)

To ensure your mushroom knowledge is up to par, we’ve dug down into the roots - or the mycelium - to find out more. A fair warning: there’s at least two more mushroom puns to come. 

🍄 Mushrooms moving mainstream  

Across the globe we’re seeing interest in mushrooms grow - from a new wave of fungi entrepreneurs creating everything from textiles to tacos, to a growing generation of hobbyists foraging our forests for the latest fungal finds.

Consumers, entrepreneurs, VC’s and even my mum - are all falling in love with fungi and its many, many possibilities.

We've gathered 60+ more fungi startups and companies you should know about (Free to access)

📚A brief background:

  • Scientists believe there are 45,000+ species of mushroom in the world. But, according to the FAO and EUROSTAT, button mushrooms account for more than 50% of global mushroom production.
  • The rarest edible mushroom is the white truffle. In fact, European white truffles are so rare that they come with a hefty price tag: around €2,200 per pound.
  • Mushrooms are a rich, low calorie source of protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals.
  • Mushrooms are relatively easy to grow and can be done in small spaces (i.e. in a quiet corner of your living room).
  • Functional or adaptogenic mushrooms were popularised by brands like Mud/Wtr and Four Sigmatic and can allegedly help the body to manage stress, reduce the signs of ageing and power up your sense of wellbeing.
  • The most common functional species are lion's mane, chaga, reishi, turkey tail, and shiitake.
  • There are many varieties of mushrooms used in cooking - from the dependable crimini to meaty morels. 
  • The Asia-Pacific region has a leading position in the global mushroom market with 82.54%. Mushrooms are particularly popular in China, Korea, and Japan. 

📈 Why are mushrooms a hot topic in FoodTech?

  • The global plant-based meat market is projected to reach $8.5B by 2025. Fungi-based protein could be the future of vegan meat.
  • Mushrooms & mycelium make for great meat-alternatives due to their versatility as well as their meat-like heft and texture, meaning they can be used to make any manner of meat or seafood substitutes.
  • Fungi tend to only require a small amount of land, energy and water to produce. 
  • Mushrooms offer something for everyone. Whether you’re vegan, vegetarian, paleo, low-carb or kosher.
  • Consumers are also buying into the adaptogenic qualities of functional mushrooms, and the market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 8.04% from 2020 to 2025.

💡 Popular fungi terminology includes: 

  • Mycelium - a filamentous, protein-rich ingredient extracted from the root structure of mushrooms. It’s a wonder material, we’ll come back to it shortly.
  • Hyphae - grow from spores of a fungal organism called a basidiomycete. As hyphae continue to grow, they fuse together to form mycelium. If environmental conditions are right, the mycelium will produce a mushroom, a.k.a. the fruiting body.

🤷 Not-so-popular fungi terminology includes:

  • Mycophile - a person who loves fungi.
  • Mycophobe - a person who fears or loathes fungi.
  • 60+ more terms here
Smallhold Farms

👀 Who - The fungi innovators:

  • Atlast Food Co. raised $40M last week to scale production of its whole cut meat alternatives. It uses mycelium to produce plant-based meat alternatives, and its first product, plant-based bacon, is made with just six ingredients.
  • Nature’s Fynd has raised $150M in equity and debt, and has opened pre-orders for its range of plant-based food products made with fungus from Yellowstone National Park.
  • Mycoworks raised $45M in November to scale up production of its mycelium-based animal-free leather, In fact, in March it teamed up with high-end French fashion brand Hermès to unveil a mushroom-based ‘leather’ travel bag, the very first bag created with its patented technology.
  • Smallhold raised $3.7M for their fungi farming technology company that provides automated, modular remotely-managed, and subscription-based growing systems.
  • Meati Foods landed $28M in November. Its specialty is fungi-based whole-cut meats, read Techrunch’s review here.
  • Prime Roots ($4.5M funding to date) launched a line of vegan-friendly ravioli in March, made with its Japanese fungus koji-based proteins.
  • Chinova Bioworks raised $2M in 2018 to harness the power of mushrooms and reduce food waste with a natural, clean-label shelf-life extender.
  • Mycotech Lab raised €71k in 2019 to turn waste into sustainable animal-free leather. It uses fermentation technology to make sustainable, mycelium-based materials.
  • Mycocycle, Inc. (no public round yet) is using mushrooms to remove toxins from waste, switching it from a burden to a reusable resource.
  • Forji (no public round yet) is making granola with functional mushrooms for all your breakfast wellbeing needs.

🔎 More: View all 60+ Fungi startups and companies here in our database. (FREE!)

FoodHack+ Fungi Database

🔮 Our predictions:

We’re only at the top of the filament when it comes to the mushroom market, and we foresee all kinds of magic happening: 

  • More food & beverage companies integrating ‘functional mushrooms’ into their products (i.e. mushroom-based fitness foods, coffee alternatives & supplements).
  • Increase in number of alternative protein startups utilising mushrooms (from whole cuts to ground meats and more).
  • Increased demand for mushrooms paving the way to more mushroom growers/farms around the world.
  • Major urban farms players start integrating mushrooms as part of their offer.
  • More spices and seasonings based on the unique umami flavour of mushrooms/more fermented seasonings made shio koji-style.
  • Consumers discovering the different flavours and textures of mushrooms - driving growth in restaurants dished and at home use.
  • Growth of mushroom-grow-kits sales and new opportunities (like subscription service and training) directed at the amateur grower. 
  • Retailers (and even restaurants) launch self-harvest options for customers.
  • Demand for sustainable fashion opening up new opportunities in material science and chemistry.
  • Mushroom agritourism becomes a thing. 

We wanted to go deeper into this space but we didn’t have mush room… Have a future fungi 🍄 prediction you’d like to share? Let us know

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