Test tube meat: science fiction fantasy or food of the future?

Test tube meat: science fiction fantasy or food of the future?

By
Louise Burfitt
July 28, 2020

You’re standing around a barbecue with friends on a sun-soaked summer’s night. Someone hands you a paper plate crowned with a juicy-looking burger, and you sink your teeth into the dripping patty without a shred of guilt. Because this burger hasn’t come from a dead animal. It hasn’t harmed the environment. And it might even be considered healthier. This burger was made in a lab.

In-vitro burgers might sound like something straight from a sci-fi novel but cultured meat could be on the market in Europe as early as 2022. The global cultured meat market is already worth $72.6 million and is expected to grow to $291.4 million by 2027. A raft of start-ups in Europe, Asia and the USA are driving innovation and attracting attention-grabbing investments as they race to get their products on plates.

So are lab-grown burgers a future food or full-on fantasy? Let’s find out how scientists are magicking up meat in a test tube and explore the pros and cons of this seemingly unstoppable trend. 

How do you grow meat in a lab?

Lab-grown meat, also known as cell-based or cultured meat, is billed as an ethical and eco-friendly alternative to traditional meat. Yet unlike substitutes such as the Impossible Burger or 3D-printed plant-based meat, cultured meat is biologically identical to the meat on our plates today. It comes from an animal, like the steak you had for lunch last week, but no creatures are harmed in the process.

Scientists take cells from a live animal’s muscle via a painless biopsy. In the lab, stem cells are placed in a bioreactor and given the ideal conditions to develop and multiply. This tissue created can then be processed into a wide variety of alternative meat products, like nuggets or sausages. A single sample from a cow could produce around 80,000 burgers

Trend drivers: animal rights, the environment and disease control 

Animal welfare is one of the key drivers behind cultured meat. So unsurprisingly animal rights organisations, like PETA, have been quick to endorse it. But while some are happy to say bye to bacon sandwiches for life, others enjoy the taste and tradition of meat too much to give it up for good. Cultured meat companies imagine their future customers will include those who ordinarily eat meat every day, and don’t plan to go vegan or veggie. 

Research shows that environmental concerns are also one of the most frequently given reasons for a reluctance to eat meat. Rearing livestock for meat consumption accounts for up to 14.5% of all emissions. And almost 60% of arable land worldwide is used to rear cattle for the production of beef. Cultivating lab meat products would require far less space and dramatically lessen methane levels and water use. 

Cell-based meat also reduces the risk of diseases transmitted between animals and humans as well as foodborne illnesses like salmonella. COVID-19 is thought to have moved from animals to people at a wet market and spread rapidly in the crowded conditions of Europe’s meat processing plants. But experts claim the clinical environment in which cultured meat is grown would make it near impossible for a virus to form in the production system. 

From lab to supermarket shelves: beef, chicken, seafood, bacon and foie gras  

Burgers have been the launch pad for most cell-based meat start-ups because ground meat is easier to replicate. But as the technology advances, more companies are branching out. 

In Singapore, Shiok Meats are working on cultured shrimp, while French start-up GOURMEY are honing in on ethical foie gras. Wild Type recently bagged $12.5 million to accelerate the production of their cultured salmon fillets, while start-up Future Meat Technologies secured $14 million to develop more cost effective chicken and beef alternatives. And just last week UK-based start-up Higher Steaks unveiled the world’s first cell-based bacon and pork belly.  

As interest and acceptance grows, companies are locked in a race to market, with many start-ups looking to launch their first products in the next few years.

Case studies: Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats

Mosa Meat, based in Maastricht, was formed in 2016, but the same team produced the first ever cultured burger back in 2013. Early taste testers struggled with its texture and appearance, so Mosa Meat’s focus since has been on improving the product to suit consumer tastes and addressing scalability. Their next goal is regulatory approval and opening their new pilot plant facility, which should allow them to launch their first products by 2022. Recognising that a high-quality end product and competitive pricing are key, they are aiming for a small-scale introduction in high-end settings before expanding to supermarkets and restaurants. Just last week, the team announced that they'd now achieved an 80x reduction in the cost of the growth medium for their product, bringing them another step closer to being able to compete with the animal-based original. 

On the other side of the pond, Memphis Meats is reaching for the sky, with the ambitious goal of feeding 10 billion people their cultured chicken, meatballs and duck by 2050. The company’s innovators are working on a flexible production method that can be applied to various animal species. They are currently planning to launch their products stateside as soon as 2021, aiming to reduce costs so they can scale up to other countries soon after. And with $161 million raised in 2020 and high-profile investors including Bill Gates and Richard Branson, it looks like their goal of streamlining the science to achieve an affordable, scalable product could soon be in reach.

Jumping the final hurdles: taste, cost and ethics 

Though the science is pretty solid, there are still a few reasons why cultured meat isn’t yet a staple. The first in-vitro burger cost $325,000, all in. As the technology has progressed, costs have reduced and are now expected to hit $10 per burger this decade. Nonetheless, lab-reared meat is still costly – especially as many consumers are used to paying bargain prices. The good news is that a study in the Netherlands found that 37% of consumers would pay more for cruelty-free meat. 

Another factor that has stalled the expansion of cultured meat until recently has been that animal cells in the lab require protein. This meant administering fetal bovine serum (FBS), taken from unborn calves, which made it a no-hoper for the pioneers trying to remove animal products from the picture. But, as of this year, several companies – including Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats – no longer use FBS in their cell culture medium and others are expected to follow their lead.

A taste and texture as close as possible to the real thing are also non-negotiables. So scientists are hard at work improving the flavour, colour and consistency to address the “dry and tasteless” criticisms levelled at early prototypes. All of the companies in the arena are working on adding just the right amounts of fats and aromas to make the juiciest cultured meat out there – because only a truly realistic lab-grown product will be able to win over die-hard meat lovers.

Business opportunities 

  • High-end restaurant looking to diversify your offer? Consider teaming up with a cultured meat company to make sure you’re first to plate up the products when they hit the market.
  • Customisable nutrition nerd? Cell-based meat could allow for expanded personalisation of the nutrients in meat. In gloomy northern European countries, for example, that might mean adding a dose of vitamin D to your cultured burgers. 
  • Are you a forward-looking retailer or manufacturer? Widely available commercial cultured meat is still a few years away, so there’s still time to contact one of the start-ups beavering away to discuss future distribution opportunities.

Written by
Louise Burfitt

Louise is an editor and writer based in Oxfordshire. When her nose isn’t buried in a dictionary, you’re most likely to find her taking long weekend walks or nurturing herbs and vegetables in her container garden.

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
  • Get Event Discounts

You’re standing around a barbecue with friends on a sun-soaked summer’s night. Someone hands you a paper plate crowned with a juicy-looking burger, and you sink your teeth into the dripping patty without a shred of guilt. Because this burger hasn’t come from a dead animal. It hasn’t harmed the environment. And it might even be considered healthier. This burger was made in a lab.

In-vitro burgers might sound like something straight from a sci-fi novel but cultured meat could be on the market in Europe as early as 2022. The global cultured meat market is already worth $72.6 million and is expected to grow to $291.4 million by 2027. A raft of start-ups in Europe, Asia and the USA are driving innovation and attracting attention-grabbing investments as they race to get their products on plates.

So are lab-grown burgers a future food or full-on fantasy? Let’s find out how scientists are magicking up meat in a test tube and explore the pros and cons of this seemingly unstoppable trend. 

How do you grow meat in a lab?

Lab-grown meat, also known as cell-based or cultured meat, is billed as an ethical and eco-friendly alternative to traditional meat. Yet unlike substitutes such as the Impossible Burger or 3D-printed plant-based meat, cultured meat is biologically identical to the meat on our plates today. It comes from an animal, like the steak you had for lunch last week, but no creatures are harmed in the process.

Scientists take cells from a live animal’s muscle via a painless biopsy. In the lab, stem cells are placed in a bioreactor and given the ideal conditions to develop and multiply. This tissue created can then be processed into a wide variety of alternative meat products, like nuggets or sausages. A single sample from a cow could produce around 80,000 burgers

Trend drivers: animal rights, the environment and disease control 

Animal welfare is one of the key drivers behind cultured meat. So unsurprisingly animal rights organisations, like PETA, have been quick to endorse it. But while some are happy to say bye to bacon sandwiches for life, others enjoy the taste and tradition of meat too much to give it up for good. Cultured meat companies imagine their future customers will include those who ordinarily eat meat every day, and don’t plan to go vegan or veggie. 

Research shows that environmental concerns are also one of the most frequently given reasons for a reluctance to eat meat. Rearing livestock for meat consumption accounts for up to 14.5% of all emissions. And almost 60% of arable land worldwide is used to rear cattle for the production of beef. Cultivating lab meat products would require far less space and dramatically lessen methane levels and water use. 

Cell-based meat also reduces the risk of diseases transmitted between animals and humans as well as foodborne illnesses like salmonella. COVID-19 is thought to have moved from animals to people at a wet market and spread rapidly in the crowded conditions of Europe’s meat processing plants. But experts claim the clinical environment in which cultured meat is grown would make it near impossible for a virus to form in the production system. 

From lab to supermarket shelves: beef, chicken, seafood, bacon and foie gras  

Burgers have been the launch pad for most cell-based meat start-ups because ground meat is easier to replicate. But as the technology advances, more companies are branching out. 

In Singapore, Shiok Meats are working on cultured shrimp, while French start-up GOURMEY are honing in on ethical foie gras. Wild Type recently bagged $12.5 million to accelerate the production of their cultured salmon fillets, while start-up Future Meat Technologies secured $14 million to develop more cost effective chicken and beef alternatives. And just last week UK-based start-up Higher Steaks unveiled the world’s first cell-based bacon and pork belly.  

As interest and acceptance grows, companies are locked in a race to market, with many start-ups looking to launch their first products in the next few years.

Case studies: Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats

Mosa Meat, based in Maastricht, was formed in 2016, but the same team produced the first ever cultured burger back in 2013. Early taste testers struggled with its texture and appearance, so Mosa Meat’s focus since has been on improving the product to suit consumer tastes and addressing scalability. Their next goal is regulatory approval and opening their new pilot plant facility, which should allow them to launch their first products by 2022. Recognising that a high-quality end product and competitive pricing are key, they are aiming for a small-scale introduction in high-end settings before expanding to supermarkets and restaurants. Just last week, the team announced that they'd now achieved an 80x reduction in the cost of the growth medium for their product, bringing them another step closer to being able to compete with the animal-based original. 

On the other side of the pond, Memphis Meats is reaching for the sky, with the ambitious goal of feeding 10 billion people their cultured chicken, meatballs and duck by 2050. The company’s innovators are working on a flexible production method that can be applied to various animal species. They are currently planning to launch their products stateside as soon as 2021, aiming to reduce costs so they can scale up to other countries soon after. And with $161 million raised in 2020 and high-profile investors including Bill Gates and Richard Branson, it looks like their goal of streamlining the science to achieve an affordable, scalable product could soon be in reach.

Jumping the final hurdles: taste, cost and ethics 

Though the science is pretty solid, there are still a few reasons why cultured meat isn’t yet a staple. The first in-vitro burger cost $325,000, all in. As the technology has progressed, costs have reduced and are now expected to hit $10 per burger this decade. Nonetheless, lab-reared meat is still costly – especially as many consumers are used to paying bargain prices. The good news is that a study in the Netherlands found that 37% of consumers would pay more for cruelty-free meat. 

Another factor that has stalled the expansion of cultured meat until recently has been that animal cells in the lab require protein. This meant administering fetal bovine serum (FBS), taken from unborn calves, which made it a no-hoper for the pioneers trying to remove animal products from the picture. But, as of this year, several companies – including Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats – no longer use FBS in their cell culture medium and others are expected to follow their lead.

A taste and texture as close as possible to the real thing are also non-negotiables. So scientists are hard at work improving the flavour, colour and consistency to address the “dry and tasteless” criticisms levelled at early prototypes. All of the companies in the arena are working on adding just the right amounts of fats and aromas to make the juiciest cultured meat out there – because only a truly realistic lab-grown product will be able to win over die-hard meat lovers.

Business opportunities 

  • High-end restaurant looking to diversify your offer? Consider teaming up with a cultured meat company to make sure you’re first to plate up the products when they hit the market.
  • Customisable nutrition nerd? Cell-based meat could allow for expanded personalisation of the nutrients in meat. In gloomy northern European countries, for example, that might mean adding a dose of vitamin D to your cultured burgers. 
  • Are you a forward-looking retailer or manufacturer? Widely available commercial cultured meat is still a few years away, so there’s still time to contact one of the start-ups beavering away to discuss future distribution opportunities.

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
  • Join a Global Community
UPGRADE NOW
Cancel anytime

You’re standing around a barbecue with friends on a sun-soaked summer’s night. Someone hands you a paper plate crowned with a juicy-looking burger, and you sink your teeth into the dripping patty without a shred of guilt. Because this burger hasn’t come from a dead animal. It hasn’t harmed the environment. And it might even be considered healthier. This burger was made in a lab.

In-vitro burgers might sound like something straight from a sci-fi novel but cultured meat could be on the market in Europe as early as 2022. The global cultured meat market is already worth $72.6 million and is expected to grow to $291.4 million by 2027. A raft of start-ups in Europe, Asia and the USA are driving innovation and attracting attention-grabbing investments as they race to get their products on plates.

So are lab-grown burgers a future food or full-on fantasy? Let’s find out how scientists are magicking up meat in a test tube and explore the pros and cons of this seemingly unstoppable trend. 

How do you grow meat in a lab?

Lab-grown meat, also known as cell-based or cultured meat, is billed as an ethical and eco-friendly alternative to traditional meat. Yet unlike substitutes such as the Impossible Burger or 3D-printed plant-based meat, cultured meat is biologically identical to the meat on our plates today. It comes from an animal, like the steak you had for lunch last week, but no creatures are harmed in the process.

Scientists take cells from a live animal’s muscle via a painless biopsy. In the lab, stem cells are placed in a bioreactor and given the ideal conditions to develop and multiply. This tissue created can then be processed into a wide variety of alternative meat products, like nuggets or sausages. A single sample from a cow could produce around 80,000 burgers

Trend drivers: animal rights, the environment and disease control 

Animal welfare is one of the key drivers behind cultured meat. So unsurprisingly animal rights organisations, like PETA, have been quick to endorse it. But while some are happy to say bye to bacon sandwiches for life, others enjoy the taste and tradition of meat too much to give it up for good. Cultured meat companies imagine their future customers will include those who ordinarily eat meat every day, and don’t plan to go vegan or veggie. 

Research shows that environmental concerns are also one of the most frequently given reasons for a reluctance to eat meat. Rearing livestock for meat consumption accounts for up to 14.5% of all emissions. And almost 60% of arable land worldwide is used to rear cattle for the production of beef. Cultivating lab meat products would require far less space and dramatically lessen methane levels and water use. 

Cell-based meat also reduces the risk of diseases transmitted between animals and humans as well as foodborne illnesses like salmonella. COVID-19 is thought to have moved from animals to people at a wet market and spread rapidly in the crowded conditions of Europe’s meat processing plants. But experts claim the clinical environment in which cultured meat is grown would make it near impossible for a virus to form in the production system. 

From lab to supermarket shelves: beef, chicken, seafood, bacon and foie gras  

Burgers have been the launch pad for most cell-based meat start-ups because ground meat is easier to replicate. But as the technology advances, more companies are branching out. 

In Singapore, Shiok Meats are working on cultured shrimp, while French start-up GOURMEY are honing in on ethical foie gras. Wild Type recently bagged $12.5 million to accelerate the production of their cultured salmon fillets, while start-up Future Meat Technologies secured $14 million to develop more cost effective chicken and beef alternatives. And just last week UK-based start-up Higher Steaks unveiled the world’s first cell-based bacon and pork belly.  

As interest and acceptance grows, companies are locked in a race to market, with many start-ups looking to launch their first products in the next few years.

Case studies: Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats

Mosa Meat, based in Maastricht, was formed in 2016, but the same team produced the first ever cultured burger back in 2013. Early taste testers struggled with its texture and appearance, so Mosa Meat’s focus since has been on improving the product to suit consumer tastes and addressing scalability. Their next goal is regulatory approval and opening their new pilot plant facility, which should allow them to launch their first products by 2022. Recognising that a high-quality end product and competitive pricing are key, they are aiming for a small-scale introduction in high-end settings before expanding to supermarkets and restaurants. Just last week, the team announced that they'd now achieved an 80x reduction in the cost of the growth medium for their product, bringing them another step closer to being able to compete with the animal-based original. 

On the other side of the pond, Memphis Meats is reaching for the sky, with the ambitious goal of feeding 10 billion people their cultured chicken, meatballs and duck by 2050. The company’s innovators are working on a flexible production method that can be applied to various animal species. They are currently planning to launch their products stateside as soon as 2021, aiming to reduce costs so they can scale up to other countries soon after. And with $161 million raised in 2020 and high-profile investors including Bill Gates and Richard Branson, it looks like their goal of streamlining the science to achieve an affordable, scalable product could soon be in reach.

Jumping the final hurdles: taste, cost and ethics 

Though the science is pretty solid, there are still a few reasons why cultured meat isn’t yet a staple. The first in-vitro burger cost $325,000, all in. As the technology has progressed, costs have reduced and are now expected to hit $10 per burger this decade. Nonetheless, lab-reared meat is still costly – especially as many consumers are used to paying bargain prices. The good news is that a study in the Netherlands found that 37% of consumers would pay more for cruelty-free meat. 

Another factor that has stalled the expansion of cultured meat until recently has been that animal cells in the lab require protein. This meant administering fetal bovine serum (FBS), taken from unborn calves, which made it a no-hoper for the pioneers trying to remove animal products from the picture. But, as of this year, several companies – including Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats – no longer use FBS in their cell culture medium and others are expected to follow their lead.

A taste and texture as close as possible to the real thing are also non-negotiables. So scientists are hard at work improving the flavour, colour and consistency to address the “dry and tasteless” criticisms levelled at early prototypes. All of the companies in the arena are working on adding just the right amounts of fats and aromas to make the juiciest cultured meat out there – because only a truly realistic lab-grown product will be able to win over die-hard meat lovers.

Business opportunities 

  • High-end restaurant looking to diversify your offer? Consider teaming up with a cultured meat company to make sure you’re first to plate up the products when they hit the market.
  • Customisable nutrition nerd? Cell-based meat could allow for expanded personalisation of the nutrients in meat. In gloomy northern European countries, for example, that might mean adding a dose of vitamin D to your cultured burgers. 
  • Are you a forward-looking retailer or manufacturer? Widely available commercial cultured meat is still a few years away, so there’s still time to contact one of the start-ups beavering away to discuss future distribution opportunities.

You’re standing around a barbecue with friends on a sun-soaked summer’s night. Someone hands you a paper plate crowned with a juicy-looking burger, and you sink your teeth into the dripping patty without a shred of guilt. Because this burger hasn’t come from a dead animal. It hasn’t harmed the environment. And it might even be considered healthier. This burger was made in a lab.

In-vitro burgers might sound like something straight from a sci-fi novel but cultured meat could be on the market in Europe as early as 2022. The global cultured meat market is already worth $72.6 million and is expected to grow to $291.4 million by 2027. A raft of start-ups in Europe, Asia and the USA are driving innovation and attracting attention-grabbing investments as they race to get their products on plates.

So are lab-grown burgers a future food or full-on fantasy? Let’s find out how scientists are magicking up meat in a test tube and explore the pros and cons of this seemingly unstoppable trend. 

How do you grow meat in a lab?

Lab-grown meat, also known as cell-based or cultured meat, is billed as an ethical and eco-friendly alternative to traditional meat. Yet unlike substitutes such as the Impossible Burger or 3D-printed plant-based meat, cultured meat is biologically identical to the meat on our plates today. It comes from an animal, like the steak you had for lunch last week, but no creatures are harmed in the process.

Scientists take cells from a live animal’s muscle via a painless biopsy. In the lab, stem cells are placed in a bioreactor and given the ideal conditions to develop and multiply. This tissue created can then be processed into a wide variety of alternative meat products, like nuggets or sausages. A single sample from a cow could produce around 80,000 burgers

Trend drivers: animal rights, the environment and disease control 

Animal welfare is one of the key drivers behind cultured meat. So unsurprisingly animal rights organisations, like PETA, have been quick to endorse it. But while some are happy to say bye to bacon sandwiches for life, others enjoy the taste and tradition of meat too much to give it up for good. Cultured meat companies imagine their future customers will include those who ordinarily eat meat every day, and don’t plan to go vegan or veggie. 

Research shows that environmental concerns are also one of the most frequently given reasons for a reluctance to eat meat. Rearing livestock for meat consumption accounts for up to 14.5% of all emissions. And almost 60% of arable land worldwide is used to rear cattle for the production of beef. Cultivating lab meat products would require far less space and dramatically lessen methane levels and water use. 

Cell-based meat also reduces the risk of diseases transmitted between animals and humans as well as foodborne illnesses like salmonella. COVID-19 is thought to have moved from animals to people at a wet market and spread rapidly in the crowded conditions of Europe’s meat processing plants. But experts claim the clinical environment in which cultured meat is grown would make it near impossible for a virus to form in the production system. 

From lab to supermarket shelves: beef, chicken, seafood, bacon and foie gras  

Burgers have been the launch pad for most cell-based meat start-ups because ground meat is easier to replicate. But as the technology advances, more companies are branching out. 

In Singapore, Shiok Meats are working on cultured shrimp, while French start-up GOURMEY are honing in on ethical foie gras. Wild Type recently bagged $12.5 million to accelerate the production of their cultured salmon fillets, while start-up Future Meat Technologies secured $14 million to develop more cost effective chicken and beef alternatives. And just last week UK-based start-up Higher Steaks unveiled the world’s first cell-based bacon and pork belly.  

As interest and acceptance grows, companies are locked in a race to market, with many start-ups looking to launch their first products in the next few years.

Case studies: Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats

Mosa Meat, based in Maastricht, was formed in 2016, but the same team produced the first ever cultured burger back in 2013. Early taste testers struggled with its texture and appearance, so Mosa Meat’s focus since has been on improving the product to suit consumer tastes and addressing scalability. Their next goal is regulatory approval and opening their new pilot plant facility, which should allow them to launch their first products by 2022. Recognising that a high-quality end product and competitive pricing are key, they are aiming for a small-scale introduction in high-end settings before expanding to supermarkets and restaurants. Just last week, the team announced that they'd now achieved an 80x reduction in the cost of the growth medium for their product, bringing them another step closer to being able to compete with the animal-based original. 

On the other side of the pond, Memphis Meats is reaching for the sky, with the ambitious goal of feeding 10 billion people their cultured chicken, meatballs and duck by 2050. The company’s innovators are working on a flexible production method that can be applied to various animal species. They are currently planning to launch their products stateside as soon as 2021, aiming to reduce costs so they can scale up to other countries soon after. And with $161 million raised in 2020 and high-profile investors including Bill Gates and Richard Branson, it looks like their goal of streamlining the science to achieve an affordable, scalable product could soon be in reach.

Jumping the final hurdles: taste, cost and ethics 

Though the science is pretty solid, there are still a few reasons why cultured meat isn’t yet a staple. The first in-vitro burger cost $325,000, all in. As the technology has progressed, costs have reduced and are now expected to hit $10 per burger this decade. Nonetheless, lab-reared meat is still costly – especially as many consumers are used to paying bargain prices. The good news is that a study in the Netherlands found that 37% of consumers would pay more for cruelty-free meat. 

Another factor that has stalled the expansion of cultured meat until recently has been that animal cells in the lab require protein. This meant administering fetal bovine serum (FBS), taken from unborn calves, which made it a no-hoper for the pioneers trying to remove animal products from the picture. But, as of this year, several companies – including Mosa Meat and Memphis Meats – no longer use FBS in their cell culture medium and others are expected to follow their lead.

A taste and texture as close as possible to the real thing are also non-negotiables. So scientists are hard at work improving the flavour, colour and consistency to address the “dry and tasteless” criticisms levelled at early prototypes. All of the companies in the arena are working on adding just the right amounts of fats and aromas to make the juiciest cultured meat out there – because only a truly realistic lab-grown product will be able to win over die-hard meat lovers.

Business opportunities 

  • High-end restaurant looking to diversify your offer? Consider teaming up with a cultured meat company to make sure you’re first to plate up the products when they hit the market.
  • Customisable nutrition nerd? Cell-based meat could allow for expanded personalisation of the nutrients in meat. In gloomy northern European countries, for example, that might mean adding a dose of vitamin D to your cultured burgers. 
  • Are you a forward-looking retailer or manufacturer? Widely available commercial cultured meat is still a few years away, so there’s still time to contact one of the start-ups beavering away to discuss future distribution opportunities.

Read More