The grocery delivery race is on 🚴‍♀️ Exploring the obsession of getting groceries delivered to your door (fast)

The grocery delivery race is on 🚴‍♀️ Exploring the obsession of getting groceries delivered to your door (fast)

By
Nicola Spalding
March 22, 2021

I want it all, and I want it now. And I want you to bring it to me, whilst I watch Netflix in my PJ's.

The above sums up consumer attitudes to groceries through the pandemic. Lockdown restrictions and covid concerns meant shoppers got used to the convenience of at-home delivery, fuelling the stratospheric rise in demand in the e-grocery space.

💸 Where there is demand, there is money. 

There’s a reason Delivery Hero launched its own venture capital fund in January. Instacart alone has raised $2.7B to date. Just last week, Fridge No More secured $15.4M, Stor.ai raised $21M, and Jiffy raised £2.6M. In the last few months we’ve seen funding rounds for Getir ($128M), Cortilia (€34M), Dija (£20M), Starship ($17M), Weezy (£14.6M) and Vembla (6M SEK), undoubtedly among others. All revolutionising the grocery delivery industry.


🏃‍♂️How fast:

Some services promise speed: alongside Fridge No More (15 minutes) and Jiffy (15 minutes), there are Gorillas(10 minutes), Weezy (15 minutes), Meituan (17 minutes), GoPuff (30 minutes), Stash (10 minutes) and Vembla (60 minutes). Some of these partner with local stores to provide a grab & go service, while others are doing things a little differently. 

🤷 Why:

We reached out to Dominique Locher former CEO of LeShop (supermarket eGrocery platform) and now an active foodtech investor on why he's just backed London-based Jiffy: 

"We're in the 2nd eFood revolution: where speed adds to convenience. Customers do not want to wait until next day to receive their groceries, or even same day or at best in a few hours. They want it now. Until today they had to run to the corner-store to quickly buy the missing milk, diapers, snacks and beer. Jiffy delivers hyperlocal within maximum 15 minutes."

Source: Jiffy

👀 Who

  • London-based Jiffy is a prime example. Instead of picking from corner shops or grocery stores, it has built its own 'dark stores'. These are hyper-local, delivery-only fulfilment centres, stocked with a limited range of SKUs. It staffs these with its own delivery personnel, giving it full visibility and control of inventory and logistics.
  • Starship makes delivery robots. Its self-driving cooler-sized vehicles carry food, groceries and more. It's raised $102M so far, and has completed one million autonomous deliveries. This video shows the robots in action.
  • Bother takes care of the 'boring basics'. Its AI-powered technology is designed to replenish household supplies before they run out. This saves energy by avoiding delivery via a refrigerated van. Its model encourages consumers to shop locally for fresh goods while bulk buying cupboard staples. It's cost-effective and environmentally-friendly. Win-win.

🔥The competition:

Startups like these are competing with the big boys. Like Walmart, which announced its partnership with smart box maker HomeValet earlier this year. It is piloting a temperature-controlled smart box for contact-free, 24/7 deliveries. Or Coca-Cola, which is delivering coffee-flavoured soda by drone to save on delivery costs. Even Singapore super app Grab has launched GrabSupermarket, its first dark grocery store. It’s focused on partnering with suppliers and farmers to deliver food products directly into the store so they can then be shipped out to customers within a 24 hour window, for maximum freshness.

🛍Takeaway:

One thing's for sure: the competition is fierce. And as the tech improves, the sky's the limit. Are there any other startups we should be tracking? Can anyone beat Gorilla's 10 minute delivery claim? Hit us up, we'd love to hear from you.

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I want it all, and I want it now. And I want you to bring it to me, whilst I watch Netflix in my PJ's.

The above sums up consumer attitudes to groceries through the pandemic. Lockdown restrictions and covid concerns meant shoppers got used to the convenience of at-home delivery, fuelling the stratospheric rise in demand in the e-grocery space.

💸 Where there is demand, there is money. 

There’s a reason Delivery Hero launched its own venture capital fund in January. Instacart alone has raised $2.7B to date. Just last week, Fridge No More secured $15.4M, Stor.ai raised $21M, and Jiffy raised £2.6M. In the last few months we’ve seen funding rounds for Getir ($128M), Cortilia (€34M), Dija (£20M), Starship ($17M), Weezy (£14.6M) and Vembla (6M SEK), undoubtedly among others. All revolutionising the grocery delivery industry.


🏃‍♂️How fast:

Some services promise speed: alongside Fridge No More (15 minutes) and Jiffy (15 minutes), there are Gorillas(10 minutes), Weezy (15 minutes), Meituan (17 minutes), GoPuff (30 minutes), Stash (10 minutes) and Vembla (60 minutes). Some of these partner with local stores to provide a grab & go service, while others are doing things a little differently. 

🤷 Why:

We reached out to Dominique Locher former CEO of LeShop (supermarket eGrocery platform) and now an active foodtech investor on why he's just backed London-based Jiffy: 

"We're in the 2nd eFood revolution: where speed adds to convenience. Customers do not want to wait until next day to receive their groceries, or even same day or at best in a few hours. They want it now. Until today they had to run to the corner-store to quickly buy the missing milk, diapers, snacks and beer. Jiffy delivers hyperlocal within maximum 15 minutes."

Source: Jiffy

👀 Who

  • London-based Jiffy is a prime example. Instead of picking from corner shops or grocery stores, it has built its own 'dark stores'. These are hyper-local, delivery-only fulfilment centres, stocked with a limited range of SKUs. It staffs these with its own delivery personnel, giving it full visibility and control of inventory and logistics.
  • Starship makes delivery robots. Its self-driving cooler-sized vehicles carry food, groceries and more. It's raised $102M so far, and has completed one million autonomous deliveries. This video shows the robots in action.
  • Bother takes care of the 'boring basics'. Its AI-powered technology is designed to replenish household supplies before they run out. This saves energy by avoiding delivery via a refrigerated van. Its model encourages consumers to shop locally for fresh goods while bulk buying cupboard staples. It's cost-effective and environmentally-friendly. Win-win.

🔥The competition:

Startups like these are competing with the big boys. Like Walmart, which announced its partnership with smart box maker HomeValet earlier this year. It is piloting a temperature-controlled smart box for contact-free, 24/7 deliveries. Or Coca-Cola, which is delivering coffee-flavoured soda by drone to save on delivery costs. Even Singapore super app Grab has launched GrabSupermarket, its first dark grocery store. It’s focused on partnering with suppliers and farmers to deliver food products directly into the store so they can then be shipped out to customers within a 24 hour window, for maximum freshness.

🛍Takeaway:

One thing's for sure: the competition is fierce. And as the tech improves, the sky's the limit. Are there any other startups we should be tracking? Can anyone beat Gorilla's 10 minute delivery claim? Hit us up, we'd love to hear from you.

I want it all, and I want it now. And I want you to bring it to me, whilst I watch Netflix in my PJ's.

The above sums up consumer attitudes to groceries through the pandemic. Lockdown restrictions and covid concerns meant shoppers got used to the convenience of at-home delivery, fuelling the stratospheric rise in demand in the e-grocery space.

💸 Where there is demand, there is money. 

There’s a reason Delivery Hero launched its own venture capital fund in January. Instacart alone has raised $2.7B to date. Just last week, Fridge No More secured $15.4M, Stor.ai raised $21M, and Jiffy raised £2.6M. In the last few months we’ve seen funding rounds for Getir ($128M), Cortilia (€34M), Dija (£20M), Starship ($17M), Weezy (£14.6M) and Vembla (6M SEK), undoubtedly among others. All revolutionising the grocery delivery industry.


🏃‍♂️How fast:

Some services promise speed: alongside Fridge No More (15 minutes) and Jiffy (15 minutes), there are Gorillas(10 minutes), Weezy (15 minutes), Meituan (17 minutes), GoPuff (30 minutes), Stash (10 minutes) and Vembla (60 minutes). Some of these partner with local stores to provide a grab & go service, while others are doing things a little differently. 

🤷 Why:

We reached out to Dominique Locher former CEO of LeShop (supermarket eGrocery platform) and now an active foodtech investor on why he's just backed London-based Jiffy: 

"We're in the 2nd eFood revolution: where speed adds to convenience. Customers do not want to wait until next day to receive their groceries, or even same day or at best in a few hours. They want it now. Until today they had to run to the corner-store to quickly buy the missing milk, diapers, snacks and beer. Jiffy delivers hyperlocal within maximum 15 minutes."

Source: Jiffy

👀 Who

  • London-based Jiffy is a prime example. Instead of picking from corner shops or grocery stores, it has built its own 'dark stores'. These are hyper-local, delivery-only fulfilment centres, stocked with a limited range of SKUs. It staffs these with its own delivery personnel, giving it full visibility and control of inventory and logistics.
  • Starship makes delivery robots. Its self-driving cooler-sized vehicles carry food, groceries and more. It's raised $102M so far, and has completed one million autonomous deliveries. This video shows the robots in action.
  • Bother takes care of the 'boring basics'. Its AI-powered technology is designed to replenish household supplies before they run out. This saves energy by avoiding delivery via a refrigerated van. Its model encourages consumers to shop locally for fresh goods while bulk buying cupboard staples. It's cost-effective and environmentally-friendly. Win-win.

🔥The competition:

Startups like these are competing with the big boys. Like Walmart, which announced its partnership with smart box maker HomeValet earlier this year. It is piloting a temperature-controlled smart box for contact-free, 24/7 deliveries. Or Coca-Cola, which is delivering coffee-flavoured soda by drone to save on delivery costs. Even Singapore super app Grab has launched GrabSupermarket, its first dark grocery store. It’s focused on partnering with suppliers and farmers to deliver food products directly into the store so they can then be shipped out to customers within a 24 hour window, for maximum freshness.

🛍Takeaway:

One thing's for sure: the competition is fierce. And as the tech improves, the sky's the limit. Are there any other startups we should be tracking? Can anyone beat Gorilla's 10 minute delivery claim? Hit us up, we'd love to hear from you.

I want it all, and I want it now. And I want you to bring it to me, whilst I watch Netflix in my PJ's.

The above sums up consumer attitudes to groceries through the pandemic. Lockdown restrictions and covid concerns meant shoppers got used to the convenience of at-home delivery, fuelling the stratospheric rise in demand in the e-grocery space.

💸 Where there is demand, there is money. 

There’s a reason Delivery Hero launched its own venture capital fund in January. Instacart alone has raised $2.7B to date. Just last week, Fridge No More secured $15.4M, Stor.ai raised $21M, and Jiffy raised £2.6M. In the last few months we’ve seen funding rounds for Getir ($128M), Cortilia (€34M), Dija (£20M), Starship ($17M), Weezy (£14.6M) and Vembla (6M SEK), undoubtedly among others. All revolutionising the grocery delivery industry.


🏃‍♂️How fast:

Some services promise speed: alongside Fridge No More (15 minutes) and Jiffy (15 minutes), there are Gorillas(10 minutes), Weezy (15 minutes), Meituan (17 minutes), GoPuff (30 minutes), Stash (10 minutes) and Vembla (60 minutes). Some of these partner with local stores to provide a grab & go service, while others are doing things a little differently. 

🤷 Why:

We reached out to Dominique Locher former CEO of LeShop (supermarket eGrocery platform) and now an active foodtech investor on why he's just backed London-based Jiffy: 

"We're in the 2nd eFood revolution: where speed adds to convenience. Customers do not want to wait until next day to receive their groceries, or even same day or at best in a few hours. They want it now. Until today they had to run to the corner-store to quickly buy the missing milk, diapers, snacks and beer. Jiffy delivers hyperlocal within maximum 15 minutes."

Source: Jiffy

👀 Who

  • London-based Jiffy is a prime example. Instead of picking from corner shops or grocery stores, it has built its own 'dark stores'. These are hyper-local, delivery-only fulfilment centres, stocked with a limited range of SKUs. It staffs these with its own delivery personnel, giving it full visibility and control of inventory and logistics.
  • Starship makes delivery robots. Its self-driving cooler-sized vehicles carry food, groceries and more. It's raised $102M so far, and has completed one million autonomous deliveries. This video shows the robots in action.
  • Bother takes care of the 'boring basics'. Its AI-powered technology is designed to replenish household supplies before they run out. This saves energy by avoiding delivery via a refrigerated van. Its model encourages consumers to shop locally for fresh goods while bulk buying cupboard staples. It's cost-effective and environmentally-friendly. Win-win.

🔥The competition:

Startups like these are competing with the big boys. Like Walmart, which announced its partnership with smart box maker HomeValet earlier this year. It is piloting a temperature-controlled smart box for contact-free, 24/7 deliveries. Or Coca-Cola, which is delivering coffee-flavoured soda by drone to save on delivery costs. Even Singapore super app Grab has launched GrabSupermarket, its first dark grocery store. It’s focused on partnering with suppliers and farmers to deliver food products directly into the store so they can then be shipped out to customers within a 24 hour window, for maximum freshness.

🛍Takeaway:

One thing's for sure: the competition is fierce. And as the tech improves, the sky's the limit. Are there any other startups we should be tracking? Can anyone beat Gorilla's 10 minute delivery claim? Hit us up, we'd love to hear from you.

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