This Week In Food: Bezos Backs The Planet and Faux Meat Pushes To Mainstream

This Week In Food: Bezos Backs The Planet and Faux Meat Pushes To Mainstream

By
Arman Anatürk
June 26, 2020

In This Week In Food, Amazon aims to even out their CO2 emissions by backing cleantech innovators. I chat with Cuban-Korean-Swiss entrepreneur Jose Amado-Blanco, about how three 20-something childless men came up with the idea for their baby food business.

And are we really ready for cultured meats? The comments section in this video by the World Economic Forum highlights that lab-grown startups might have a way to go to win over mainstream consumers.

Thanks for all the interest in our FoodHack Discovery feature which we announced last week. We've gotten great submissions from across the globe (from India to Germany!). So keep 'em coming.


Bezos backs the planet 🌎

The world's richest man decided to do something good with his pocket change.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced a $2 billion venture fund to invest in cleantech. He even bought an arena in Seattle and named it after it - so you know he's serious. The Climate Pledge fund is intended to help the company meet its net-zero carbon goal by 2040 and investments will spread across industries, from transportation and logistics to food and agriculture.

Companies of all sizes and stages will be considered, from pre-product startups to well-established enterprises looking to scale.

With the food system accounting for 25% of total global greenhouse gas emissions, investment into startups and companies looking to decarbonize the food system is likely to be a strong pitch for the $2B fund.

But here's a tip. Bezos hates PowerPoints. So if you're looking for a slice of the dough - maybe try sending in a handwritten letter instead?

Battle of the billionaires. Amazon isn't the only multinational to show they care about the planet. Back in January, Microsoft pledged $1B to fund climate innovation. Bezos just 1-upped them by adding another billion..


Mainstreaming faux meat  🥩

106587820-15929120024701000x-1.jpg

We've written about plant-based meats extensively and interviewed some of the game changers and funders in this space - so it's easy to think that everyone from your neighbor to your furry four-legged friends is on a plant-based diet.

But now that the sun's out and it's BBQ season, the smell of real meat grilling on an open flame fills the air and you realize that plant-based might not yet be as mainstream as our newsletters led you to believe.

On the other hand, fueled by covid outbreaks in meat plants from Germany to the U.S. and meat shortages across the globe, the alt-meat gang has gained some fans. Sales of meat alternatives nearly tripled compared to the year before and plant-based companies are looking to capitalize and make the push to the mainstream by competing on price and offering convenience, two things consumers love.

Just this week Impossible Foods found their way onto Starbucks menus with their vegan sausage breakfast sandwich, only a few weeks after the launch of their direct to consumer products.

And Beyond Meat last week released the "Cookout Classic" a limited-time cookout-friendly range of their plant-based patties in hopes to win over more price-sensitive consumers and compete with big beef.

With companies like Bumble Bee Tuna committing $40M To Sustainability & Plant-Based Alternatives and Canada's PM Justin Trudeau announcing they'll be committing $100M into the plant-based food industry, it's clear this sector is only projected to go one way - and that's 📈


The Secret Sauce 🎙 Pioneering a baby food revolution: Jose Amado-Blanco, Co-Founder, Yamo 👶

When you think of three 20-something childless men, baby food perhaps isn’t the first business venture that would spring to mind. But for José and his co-founders Tobias and Luca, the opportunity was clear.

Everyone was talking about fresh, healthy, sustainable food - but still feeding the tiniest members of our families products that were older than they were, so instead these three guys got together and launched their own products offering organic, all-natural swiss made baby food.

Today, Yamo is a fast-growing team of 30+ people backed by the likes of Five Season Ventures, Ringier Digital, and Doodle founder, Myke Naf, amongst others.  

This episode is full of great advice for early-stage entrepreneurs, from the importance of building a building Minimum Lovable Products, not MVP to making quick decisions and moving fast. Plus José's not shy to reveal the startup low's and how launching too soon almost cost them their early customer base. Listen to the full episode.


Making protein from air 💨

01-FoodHackNewsletters-Trend-AirBased-Protein-2.jpg

Move over mushrooms. So long soya. Adieu algae. There’s a brand-new ingredient set to take over the plant-based protein scene. Air. Yes, you read that correctly. The very air we breathe.

While researching how to sustain astronauts on long-distance missions, scientists made a handy discovery: microorganisms could capture the carbon dioxide exhaled by crew members and transform it into nutritious food.

Today, many experts see air-based foods as a game changer for those of us back here on Earth too. In autumn last year, US-based start-up, Air Protein, introduced the world’s first air-based meat. This month, they were recognized by the World Economic Forum as one of the most promising technology pioneers of 2020. And after bagging €3.5 million in a Series A funding round last year, their European competitor, Solar Foods, is now on track for market launch in 2022.

But what exactly is air-based protein and how do the teams behind this innovative ingredient see it making its way into our favourite foods? Let’s delve a little deeper into how this space travel-inspired product could be one meaty step forward for the food industry but an even larger leap for mankind. Read the full report.


New in Funding:


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The Digest:

Written by
Arman Anatürk

Lived across North America, Europe and Asia, leading to my questionable cooking style. Jumped two feet forward into the startup world in 2013, and haven't looked back since. Always on the hunt for the next story or inside scoop to cover - email me or connect on LinkedIn.

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In This Week In Food, Amazon aims to even out their CO2 emissions by backing cleantech innovators. I chat with Cuban-Korean-Swiss entrepreneur Jose Amado-Blanco, about how three 20-something childless men came up with the idea for their baby food business.

And are we really ready for cultured meats? The comments section in this video by the World Economic Forum highlights that lab-grown startups might have a way to go to win over mainstream consumers.

Thanks for all the interest in our FoodHack Discovery feature which we announced last week. We've gotten great submissions from across the globe (from India to Germany!). So keep 'em coming.


Bezos backs the planet 🌎

The world's richest man decided to do something good with his pocket change.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced a $2 billion venture fund to invest in cleantech. He even bought an arena in Seattle and named it after it - so you know he's serious. The Climate Pledge fund is intended to help the company meet its net-zero carbon goal by 2040 and investments will spread across industries, from transportation and logistics to food and agriculture.

Companies of all sizes and stages will be considered, from pre-product startups to well-established enterprises looking to scale.

With the food system accounting for 25% of total global greenhouse gas emissions, investment into startups and companies looking to decarbonize the food system is likely to be a strong pitch for the $2B fund.

But here's a tip. Bezos hates PowerPoints. So if you're looking for a slice of the dough - maybe try sending in a handwritten letter instead?

Battle of the billionaires. Amazon isn't the only multinational to show they care about the planet. Back in January, Microsoft pledged $1B to fund climate innovation. Bezos just 1-upped them by adding another billion..


Mainstreaming faux meat  🥩

106587820-15929120024701000x-1.jpg

We've written about plant-based meats extensively and interviewed some of the game changers and funders in this space - so it's easy to think that everyone from your neighbor to your furry four-legged friends is on a plant-based diet.

But now that the sun's out and it's BBQ season, the smell of real meat grilling on an open flame fills the air and you realize that plant-based might not yet be as mainstream as our newsletters led you to believe.

On the other hand, fueled by covid outbreaks in meat plants from Germany to the U.S. and meat shortages across the globe, the alt-meat gang has gained some fans. Sales of meat alternatives nearly tripled compared to the year before and plant-based companies are looking to capitalize and make the push to the mainstream by competing on price and offering convenience, two things consumers love.

Just this week Impossible Foods found their way onto Starbucks menus with their vegan sausage breakfast sandwich, only a few weeks after the launch of their direct to consumer products.

And Beyond Meat last week released the "Cookout Classic" a limited-time cookout-friendly range of their plant-based patties in hopes to win over more price-sensitive consumers and compete with big beef.

With companies like Bumble Bee Tuna committing $40M To Sustainability & Plant-Based Alternatives and Canada's PM Justin Trudeau announcing they'll be committing $100M into the plant-based food industry, it's clear this sector is only projected to go one way - and that's 📈


The Secret Sauce 🎙 Pioneering a baby food revolution: Jose Amado-Blanco, Co-Founder, Yamo 👶

When you think of three 20-something childless men, baby food perhaps isn’t the first business venture that would spring to mind. But for José and his co-founders Tobias and Luca, the opportunity was clear.

Everyone was talking about fresh, healthy, sustainable food - but still feeding the tiniest members of our families products that were older than they were, so instead these three guys got together and launched their own products offering organic, all-natural swiss made baby food.

Today, Yamo is a fast-growing team of 30+ people backed by the likes of Five Season Ventures, Ringier Digital, and Doodle founder, Myke Naf, amongst others.  

This episode is full of great advice for early-stage entrepreneurs, from the importance of building a building Minimum Lovable Products, not MVP to making quick decisions and moving fast. Plus José's not shy to reveal the startup low's and how launching too soon almost cost them their early customer base. Listen to the full episode.


Making protein from air 💨

01-FoodHackNewsletters-Trend-AirBased-Protein-2.jpg

Move over mushrooms. So long soya. Adieu algae. There’s a brand-new ingredient set to take over the plant-based protein scene. Air. Yes, you read that correctly. The very air we breathe.

While researching how to sustain astronauts on long-distance missions, scientists made a handy discovery: microorganisms could capture the carbon dioxide exhaled by crew members and transform it into nutritious food.

Today, many experts see air-based foods as a game changer for those of us back here on Earth too. In autumn last year, US-based start-up, Air Protein, introduced the world’s first air-based meat. This month, they were recognized by the World Economic Forum as one of the most promising technology pioneers of 2020. And after bagging €3.5 million in a Series A funding round last year, their European competitor, Solar Foods, is now on track for market launch in 2022.

But what exactly is air-based protein and how do the teams behind this innovative ingredient see it making its way into our favourite foods? Let’s delve a little deeper into how this space travel-inspired product could be one meaty step forward for the food industry but an even larger leap for mankind. Read the full report.


New in Funding:


<hr style="border-top: 1px dashed #d3d3d3;">

The Digest:

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In This Week In Food, Amazon aims to even out their CO2 emissions by backing cleantech innovators. I chat with Cuban-Korean-Swiss entrepreneur Jose Amado-Blanco, about how three 20-something childless men came up with the idea for their baby food business.

And are we really ready for cultured meats? The comments section in this video by the World Economic Forum highlights that lab-grown startups might have a way to go to win over mainstream consumers.

Thanks for all the interest in our FoodHack Discovery feature which we announced last week. We've gotten great submissions from across the globe (from India to Germany!). So keep 'em coming.


Bezos backs the planet 🌎

The world's richest man decided to do something good with his pocket change.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced a $2 billion venture fund to invest in cleantech. He even bought an arena in Seattle and named it after it - so you know he's serious. The Climate Pledge fund is intended to help the company meet its net-zero carbon goal by 2040 and investments will spread across industries, from transportation and logistics to food and agriculture.

Companies of all sizes and stages will be considered, from pre-product startups to well-established enterprises looking to scale.

With the food system accounting for 25% of total global greenhouse gas emissions, investment into startups and companies looking to decarbonize the food system is likely to be a strong pitch for the $2B fund.

But here's a tip. Bezos hates PowerPoints. So if you're looking for a slice of the dough - maybe try sending in a handwritten letter instead?

Battle of the billionaires. Amazon isn't the only multinational to show they care about the planet. Back in January, Microsoft pledged $1B to fund climate innovation. Bezos just 1-upped them by adding another billion..


Mainstreaming faux meat  🥩

106587820-15929120024701000x-1.jpg

We've written about plant-based meats extensively and interviewed some of the game changers and funders in this space - so it's easy to think that everyone from your neighbor to your furry four-legged friends is on a plant-based diet.

But now that the sun's out and it's BBQ season, the smell of real meat grilling on an open flame fills the air and you realize that plant-based might not yet be as mainstream as our newsletters led you to believe.

On the other hand, fueled by covid outbreaks in meat plants from Germany to the U.S. and meat shortages across the globe, the alt-meat gang has gained some fans. Sales of meat alternatives nearly tripled compared to the year before and plant-based companies are looking to capitalize and make the push to the mainstream by competing on price and offering convenience, two things consumers love.

Just this week Impossible Foods found their way onto Starbucks menus with their vegan sausage breakfast sandwich, only a few weeks after the launch of their direct to consumer products.

And Beyond Meat last week released the "Cookout Classic" a limited-time cookout-friendly range of their plant-based patties in hopes to win over more price-sensitive consumers and compete with big beef.

With companies like Bumble Bee Tuna committing $40M To Sustainability & Plant-Based Alternatives and Canada's PM Justin Trudeau announcing they'll be committing $100M into the plant-based food industry, it's clear this sector is only projected to go one way - and that's 📈


The Secret Sauce 🎙 Pioneering a baby food revolution: Jose Amado-Blanco, Co-Founder, Yamo 👶

When you think of three 20-something childless men, baby food perhaps isn’t the first business venture that would spring to mind. But for José and his co-founders Tobias and Luca, the opportunity was clear.

Everyone was talking about fresh, healthy, sustainable food - but still feeding the tiniest members of our families products that were older than they were, so instead these three guys got together and launched their own products offering organic, all-natural swiss made baby food.

Today, Yamo is a fast-growing team of 30+ people backed by the likes of Five Season Ventures, Ringier Digital, and Doodle founder, Myke Naf, amongst others.  

This episode is full of great advice for early-stage entrepreneurs, from the importance of building a building Minimum Lovable Products, not MVP to making quick decisions and moving fast. Plus José's not shy to reveal the startup low's and how launching too soon almost cost them their early customer base. Listen to the full episode.


Making protein from air 💨

01-FoodHackNewsletters-Trend-AirBased-Protein-2.jpg

Move over mushrooms. So long soya. Adieu algae. There’s a brand-new ingredient set to take over the plant-based protein scene. Air. Yes, you read that correctly. The very air we breathe.

While researching how to sustain astronauts on long-distance missions, scientists made a handy discovery: microorganisms could capture the carbon dioxide exhaled by crew members and transform it into nutritious food.

Today, many experts see air-based foods as a game changer for those of us back here on Earth too. In autumn last year, US-based start-up, Air Protein, introduced the world’s first air-based meat. This month, they were recognized by the World Economic Forum as one of the most promising technology pioneers of 2020. And after bagging €3.5 million in a Series A funding round last year, their European competitor, Solar Foods, is now on track for market launch in 2022.

But what exactly is air-based protein and how do the teams behind this innovative ingredient see it making its way into our favourite foods? Let’s delve a little deeper into how this space travel-inspired product could be one meaty step forward for the food industry but an even larger leap for mankind. Read the full report.


New in Funding:


<hr style="border-top: 1px dashed #d3d3d3;">

The Digest:

In This Week In Food, Amazon aims to even out their CO2 emissions by backing cleantech innovators. I chat with Cuban-Korean-Swiss entrepreneur Jose Amado-Blanco, about how three 20-something childless men came up with the idea for their baby food business.

And are we really ready for cultured meats? The comments section in this video by the World Economic Forum highlights that lab-grown startups might have a way to go to win over mainstream consumers.

Thanks for all the interest in our FoodHack Discovery feature which we announced last week. We've gotten great submissions from across the globe (from India to Germany!). So keep 'em coming.


Bezos backs the planet 🌎

The world's richest man decided to do something good with his pocket change.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced a $2 billion venture fund to invest in cleantech. He even bought an arena in Seattle and named it after it - so you know he's serious. The Climate Pledge fund is intended to help the company meet its net-zero carbon goal by 2040 and investments will spread across industries, from transportation and logistics to food and agriculture.

Companies of all sizes and stages will be considered, from pre-product startups to well-established enterprises looking to scale.

With the food system accounting for 25% of total global greenhouse gas emissions, investment into startups and companies looking to decarbonize the food system is likely to be a strong pitch for the $2B fund.

But here's a tip. Bezos hates PowerPoints. So if you're looking for a slice of the dough - maybe try sending in a handwritten letter instead?

Battle of the billionaires. Amazon isn't the only multinational to show they care about the planet. Back in January, Microsoft pledged $1B to fund climate innovation. Bezos just 1-upped them by adding another billion..


Mainstreaming faux meat  🥩

106587820-15929120024701000x-1.jpg

We've written about plant-based meats extensively and interviewed some of the game changers and funders in this space - so it's easy to think that everyone from your neighbor to your furry four-legged friends is on a plant-based diet.

But now that the sun's out and it's BBQ season, the smell of real meat grilling on an open flame fills the air and you realize that plant-based might not yet be as mainstream as our newsletters led you to believe.

On the other hand, fueled by covid outbreaks in meat plants from Germany to the U.S. and meat shortages across the globe, the alt-meat gang has gained some fans. Sales of meat alternatives nearly tripled compared to the year before and plant-based companies are looking to capitalize and make the push to the mainstream by competing on price and offering convenience, two things consumers love.

Just this week Impossible Foods found their way onto Starbucks menus with their vegan sausage breakfast sandwich, only a few weeks after the launch of their direct to consumer products.

And Beyond Meat last week released the "Cookout Classic" a limited-time cookout-friendly range of their plant-based patties in hopes to win over more price-sensitive consumers and compete with big beef.

With companies like Bumble Bee Tuna committing $40M To Sustainability & Plant-Based Alternatives and Canada's PM Justin Trudeau announcing they'll be committing $100M into the plant-based food industry, it's clear this sector is only projected to go one way - and that's 📈


The Secret Sauce 🎙 Pioneering a baby food revolution: Jose Amado-Blanco, Co-Founder, Yamo 👶

When you think of three 20-something childless men, baby food perhaps isn’t the first business venture that would spring to mind. But for José and his co-founders Tobias and Luca, the opportunity was clear.

Everyone was talking about fresh, healthy, sustainable food - but still feeding the tiniest members of our families products that were older than they were, so instead these three guys got together and launched their own products offering organic, all-natural swiss made baby food.

Today, Yamo is a fast-growing team of 30+ people backed by the likes of Five Season Ventures, Ringier Digital, and Doodle founder, Myke Naf, amongst others.  

This episode is full of great advice for early-stage entrepreneurs, from the importance of building a building Minimum Lovable Products, not MVP to making quick decisions and moving fast. Plus José's not shy to reveal the startup low's and how launching too soon almost cost them their early customer base. Listen to the full episode.


Making protein from air 💨

01-FoodHackNewsletters-Trend-AirBased-Protein-2.jpg

Move over mushrooms. So long soya. Adieu algae. There’s a brand-new ingredient set to take over the plant-based protein scene. Air. Yes, you read that correctly. The very air we breathe.

While researching how to sustain astronauts on long-distance missions, scientists made a handy discovery: microorganisms could capture the carbon dioxide exhaled by crew members and transform it into nutritious food.

Today, many experts see air-based foods as a game changer for those of us back here on Earth too. In autumn last year, US-based start-up, Air Protein, introduced the world’s first air-based meat. This month, they were recognized by the World Economic Forum as one of the most promising technology pioneers of 2020. And after bagging €3.5 million in a Series A funding round last year, their European competitor, Solar Foods, is now on track for market launch in 2022.

But what exactly is air-based protein and how do the teams behind this innovative ingredient see it making its way into our favourite foods? Let’s delve a little deeper into how this space travel-inspired product could be one meaty step forward for the food industry but an even larger leap for mankind. Read the full report.


New in Funding:


<hr style="border-top: 1px dashed #d3d3d3;">

The Digest: