This Week In Food: Tonights Dinner Is Printed & Eating Away The Plastic Problem

This Week In Food: Tonights Dinner Is Printed & Eating Away The Plastic Problem

By
Arman Anatürk
July 3, 2020

In This Week In Food, imagine turning down $2.6B - Postmates did. I chat with Fengru Lin, co-founder and CEO of Turtle Tree Labs about their cell-based milk tech as they just close off a fresh round of seed funding. 
What are the food trends that will be accelerated post-COVID? I gave my predictions on a LinkedIn post and heard back from experts and enthusiasts across the board with popular responses including algae and fermentation to way-out-there ideas like this 🤷 

Also, has Coca Cola's product innovation team completely lost it with this range of coffee-cola products? You let me know ☕️

Tip: If you'd like to get your product featured on FoodHack Discovery and in front of our readers (it's free) Submit your product here and we'll include it into next week's newsletter if selected.

Tonights Dinner Is Printed 🥩

Source: France24

This week, Redefine Meat announced the launch of their trademark Alt-Steak, a plant-based 3D printed steak, with consumer testing to kick off in high-end restaurants this year.

How it works: Redefine Meat's plant-based steaks are printed from three different ingredient packs which the company calls ‘Alt-Fat’, ‘Alt-Muscle’ and ‘Alt-Blood.’ Here's a video with a scientist.

CEO Eshchar Ben-Shitrit said “By using separate formulations for muscle, fat and blood, we can focus on each individual aspect of creating the perfect Alt-Steak product,”  

Think that's impressive? The company also announced their high-production industrial-level 3D printing capabilities allowing them to print up to 50 steaks an hour 🖨 that put my office printer to shame.

The company will roll out its 3D printed steaks to select restaurants in Europe this fall for market tests as it prepares for a broader rollout of its industrial 3D meat printers to meat distributors in 2021.

As part of the announcement, the company also partnered with global flavor conglomerate Givaudan, who worked closely with the company in mapping the flavor components of the company’s Alt-Steak formulation.

If you haven't already, check out our podcast episode with Eschar where he shares with us his early life before founding Redefine Meat - it's one of our most popular episodes 🔥


If we can't beat it - eat it 🥄

Pre-corona reusable bags were becoming the norm, coffee cup's the cool thing to do, and re-fill stations set to be the next big thing.

But as the pandemic struck, single-use plastic bags, containers and utensils have been on the rise due to health concerns. The problem has been especially apparent in the restaurant industry due to its increased reliance on food delivery services.

Whilst takeout and delivery isn't likely to go away anytime soon, we take a quick look at companies out there working on solutions that can convert food byproducts into reusable packaging:

  • Ecoinno, makes compostable packaging from leftover bamboo and sugarcane pulp, recently raised $6m in funding.
  • Varden recently received $2.2m in funding from Horizons Ventures. Varden converts sugarcane byproducts to packaging and aims to replace the plastic coffee pod.
  • Pulpworks uses byproducts from sugarcane, bamboo, and rice to create sustainable packaging for all types of goods, from electronics to food to personal care and medical devices.
  • NOM makes flavored edible straws out of basic ingredients including as rice flour, wheat flour, refined oil, salt, sugar
  • Candy Cutlery uses sugar cane to make spoons and cups meant for desserts (and that can be eaten afterwards).
  • Ecoshell uses sugar cane and cornstarch-based inputs to make cutlery, bags, and containers.
  • Loliware uses seaweed for what it claims is the "first certified edible bioplastic" (e.g., edible straws).
  • Notpla creates seaweed and plant-based packaging that "disappears" in the environment.
  • Do Eat makes potato waste-based containers.


Whilst many of these companies still have a long way to go before commercializing their products and making them price-competitive to plastic, it's positive to see both the number of companies in this space rising and the amount of investment entering into this category growing.

The Secret Sauce  From A Career In Tech To Making Cell-Based Milk: Fengru Lin, co-founder & CEO, Turtle Tree Labs

Imagine putting in half a million dollars of your own money into your startup.  

That’s exactly what co-founders, Fengru Lin, Max Rye and Rabail Toor did when they knew they had identified a novel approach to address the unsustainable dairy industry, a $716B global market.

Turtle Tree Labs are the first company in the world producing real, whole milk from cell cultivation — which opens the door for safer, healthier and customized dairy products that can be produced with far fewer natural resources and without the need for animals.

But Fengru’s journey didn’t start deep in the labs tinkering with cell-based technologies, instead, she was working in the offices of tech giants like Google and Salesforce.

During this time, Fengru picked up two things; her passion for cheese-making 🧀 and the insatiable 10x mentality instilled from her tech surroundings. So when the time came for her to launch her own business, she knew she had to aim for something big.

Dairy 2.0: will it be plants or microbes that put cows out of a job? 🐄

For many years, soya was the undisputed champion of the lactose intolerant and alt-milk junkies. Then almond, rice and coconut arrived on the scene and alternatives broke into, then dominated, mainstream supermarket aisles. But today, dairy 2.0 has risen to new heights.

As well as the established giants – like Alpro, Blue Diamond Growers and Oatly – global food brands like Danone have joined the party. A diverse start-up scene has seen ambitious entrepreneurs milking everything in sight and cooking up all sorts of product innovations – from hemp and pea milk to chickpea ice cream and cheese made of cauliflower.

Then there are those who want to skip agriculture altogether. Precision fermentation advocates claim that this new microbe-driven production technique will make dairy farming obsolete by 2035.

So it seems that putting cows out of a job is big business. Fuelled by growing consumer demand and investors turning up the heat on carbon reduction commitments, the global dairy alternatives market is set to grow to $41 billion by 2025.

Thinking of ditching dairy? This week, we explore how the dairy alternatives market is evolving in 2020 and take a look at how innovative food businesses can milk this growing trend.

New in Funding:

In other news:


Written by
Arman Anatürk

Lived across North America, Europe and Asia, leading to my questionable cooking style. Jumped two feet forward into the startup world in 2013, and haven't looked back since. Always on the hunt for the next story or inside scoop to cover - email me or connect on LinkedIn.

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
  • Get Event Discounts

In This Week In Food, imagine turning down $2.6B - Postmates did. I chat with Fengru Lin, co-founder and CEO of Turtle Tree Labs about their cell-based milk tech as they just close off a fresh round of seed funding. 
What are the food trends that will be accelerated post-COVID? I gave my predictions on a LinkedIn post and heard back from experts and enthusiasts across the board with popular responses including algae and fermentation to way-out-there ideas like this 🤷 

Also, has Coca Cola's product innovation team completely lost it with this range of coffee-cola products? You let me know ☕️

Tip: If you'd like to get your product featured on FoodHack Discovery and in front of our readers (it's free) Submit your product here and we'll include it into next week's newsletter if selected.

Tonights Dinner Is Printed 🥩

Source: France24

This week, Redefine Meat announced the launch of their trademark Alt-Steak, a plant-based 3D printed steak, with consumer testing to kick off in high-end restaurants this year.

How it works: Redefine Meat's plant-based steaks are printed from three different ingredient packs which the company calls ‘Alt-Fat’, ‘Alt-Muscle’ and ‘Alt-Blood.’ Here's a video with a scientist.

CEO Eshchar Ben-Shitrit said “By using separate formulations for muscle, fat and blood, we can focus on each individual aspect of creating the perfect Alt-Steak product,”  

Think that's impressive? The company also announced their high-production industrial-level 3D printing capabilities allowing them to print up to 50 steaks an hour 🖨 that put my office printer to shame.

The company will roll out its 3D printed steaks to select restaurants in Europe this fall for market tests as it prepares for a broader rollout of its industrial 3D meat printers to meat distributors in 2021.

As part of the announcement, the company also partnered with global flavor conglomerate Givaudan, who worked closely with the company in mapping the flavor components of the company’s Alt-Steak formulation.

If you haven't already, check out our podcast episode with Eschar where he shares with us his early life before founding Redefine Meat - it's one of our most popular episodes 🔥


If we can't beat it - eat it 🥄

Pre-corona reusable bags were becoming the norm, coffee cup's the cool thing to do, and re-fill stations set to be the next big thing.

But as the pandemic struck, single-use plastic bags, containers and utensils have been on the rise due to health concerns. The problem has been especially apparent in the restaurant industry due to its increased reliance on food delivery services.

Whilst takeout and delivery isn't likely to go away anytime soon, we take a quick look at companies out there working on solutions that can convert food byproducts into reusable packaging:

  • Ecoinno, makes compostable packaging from leftover bamboo and sugarcane pulp, recently raised $6m in funding.
  • Varden recently received $2.2m in funding from Horizons Ventures. Varden converts sugarcane byproducts to packaging and aims to replace the plastic coffee pod.
  • Pulpworks uses byproducts from sugarcane, bamboo, and rice to create sustainable packaging for all types of goods, from electronics to food to personal care and medical devices.
  • NOM makes flavored edible straws out of basic ingredients including as rice flour, wheat flour, refined oil, salt, sugar
  • Candy Cutlery uses sugar cane to make spoons and cups meant for desserts (and that can be eaten afterwards).
  • Ecoshell uses sugar cane and cornstarch-based inputs to make cutlery, bags, and containers.
  • Loliware uses seaweed for what it claims is the "first certified edible bioplastic" (e.g., edible straws).
  • Notpla creates seaweed and plant-based packaging that "disappears" in the environment.
  • Do Eat makes potato waste-based containers.


Whilst many of these companies still have a long way to go before commercializing their products and making them price-competitive to plastic, it's positive to see both the number of companies in this space rising and the amount of investment entering into this category growing.

The Secret Sauce  From A Career In Tech To Making Cell-Based Milk: Fengru Lin, co-founder & CEO, Turtle Tree Labs

Imagine putting in half a million dollars of your own money into your startup.  

That’s exactly what co-founders, Fengru Lin, Max Rye and Rabail Toor did when they knew they had identified a novel approach to address the unsustainable dairy industry, a $716B global market.

Turtle Tree Labs are the first company in the world producing real, whole milk from cell cultivation — which opens the door for safer, healthier and customized dairy products that can be produced with far fewer natural resources and without the need for animals.

But Fengru’s journey didn’t start deep in the labs tinkering with cell-based technologies, instead, she was working in the offices of tech giants like Google and Salesforce.

During this time, Fengru picked up two things; her passion for cheese-making 🧀 and the insatiable 10x mentality instilled from her tech surroundings. So when the time came for her to launch her own business, she knew she had to aim for something big.

Dairy 2.0: will it be plants or microbes that put cows out of a job? 🐄

For many years, soya was the undisputed champion of the lactose intolerant and alt-milk junkies. Then almond, rice and coconut arrived on the scene and alternatives broke into, then dominated, mainstream supermarket aisles. But today, dairy 2.0 has risen to new heights.

As well as the established giants – like Alpro, Blue Diamond Growers and Oatly – global food brands like Danone have joined the party. A diverse start-up scene has seen ambitious entrepreneurs milking everything in sight and cooking up all sorts of product innovations – from hemp and pea milk to chickpea ice cream and cheese made of cauliflower.

Then there are those who want to skip agriculture altogether. Precision fermentation advocates claim that this new microbe-driven production technique will make dairy farming obsolete by 2035.

So it seems that putting cows out of a job is big business. Fuelled by growing consumer demand and investors turning up the heat on carbon reduction commitments, the global dairy alternatives market is set to grow to $41 billion by 2025.

Thinking of ditching dairy? This week, we explore how the dairy alternatives market is evolving in 2020 and take a look at how innovative food businesses can milk this growing trend.

New in Funding:

In other news:


Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Read Unlimited Articles
  • Access Member Directory
  • Join a Global Community
UPGRADE NOW
Cancel anytime

In This Week In Food, imagine turning down $2.6B - Postmates did. I chat with Fengru Lin, co-founder and CEO of Turtle Tree Labs about their cell-based milk tech as they just close off a fresh round of seed funding. 
What are the food trends that will be accelerated post-COVID? I gave my predictions on a LinkedIn post and heard back from experts and enthusiasts across the board with popular responses including algae and fermentation to way-out-there ideas like this 🤷 

Also, has Coca Cola's product innovation team completely lost it with this range of coffee-cola products? You let me know ☕️

Tip: If you'd like to get your product featured on FoodHack Discovery and in front of our readers (it's free) Submit your product here and we'll include it into next week's newsletter if selected.

Tonights Dinner Is Printed 🥩

Source: France24

This week, Redefine Meat announced the launch of their trademark Alt-Steak, a plant-based 3D printed steak, with consumer testing to kick off in high-end restaurants this year.

How it works: Redefine Meat's plant-based steaks are printed from three different ingredient packs which the company calls ‘Alt-Fat’, ‘Alt-Muscle’ and ‘Alt-Blood.’ Here's a video with a scientist.

CEO Eshchar Ben-Shitrit said “By using separate formulations for muscle, fat and blood, we can focus on each individual aspect of creating the perfect Alt-Steak product,”  

Think that's impressive? The company also announced their high-production industrial-level 3D printing capabilities allowing them to print up to 50 steaks an hour 🖨 that put my office printer to shame.

The company will roll out its 3D printed steaks to select restaurants in Europe this fall for market tests as it prepares for a broader rollout of its industrial 3D meat printers to meat distributors in 2021.

As part of the announcement, the company also partnered with global flavor conglomerate Givaudan, who worked closely with the company in mapping the flavor components of the company’s Alt-Steak formulation.

If you haven't already, check out our podcast episode with Eschar where he shares with us his early life before founding Redefine Meat - it's one of our most popular episodes 🔥


If we can't beat it - eat it 🥄

Pre-corona reusable bags were becoming the norm, coffee cup's the cool thing to do, and re-fill stations set to be the next big thing.

But as the pandemic struck, single-use plastic bags, containers and utensils have been on the rise due to health concerns. The problem has been especially apparent in the restaurant industry due to its increased reliance on food delivery services.

Whilst takeout and delivery isn't likely to go away anytime soon, we take a quick look at companies out there working on solutions that can convert food byproducts into reusable packaging:

  • Ecoinno, makes compostable packaging from leftover bamboo and sugarcane pulp, recently raised $6m in funding.
  • Varden recently received $2.2m in funding from Horizons Ventures. Varden converts sugarcane byproducts to packaging and aims to replace the plastic coffee pod.
  • Pulpworks uses byproducts from sugarcane, bamboo, and rice to create sustainable packaging for all types of goods, from electronics to food to personal care and medical devices.
  • NOM makes flavored edible straws out of basic ingredients including as rice flour, wheat flour, refined oil, salt, sugar
  • Candy Cutlery uses sugar cane to make spoons and cups meant for desserts (and that can be eaten afterwards).
  • Ecoshell uses sugar cane and cornstarch-based inputs to make cutlery, bags, and containers.
  • Loliware uses seaweed for what it claims is the "first certified edible bioplastic" (e.g., edible straws).
  • Notpla creates seaweed and plant-based packaging that "disappears" in the environment.
  • Do Eat makes potato waste-based containers.


Whilst many of these companies still have a long way to go before commercializing their products and making them price-competitive to plastic, it's positive to see both the number of companies in this space rising and the amount of investment entering into this category growing.

The Secret Sauce  From A Career In Tech To Making Cell-Based Milk: Fengru Lin, co-founder & CEO, Turtle Tree Labs

Imagine putting in half a million dollars of your own money into your startup.  

That’s exactly what co-founders, Fengru Lin, Max Rye and Rabail Toor did when they knew they had identified a novel approach to address the unsustainable dairy industry, a $716B global market.

Turtle Tree Labs are the first company in the world producing real, whole milk from cell cultivation — which opens the door for safer, healthier and customized dairy products that can be produced with far fewer natural resources and without the need for animals.

But Fengru’s journey didn’t start deep in the labs tinkering with cell-based technologies, instead, she was working in the offices of tech giants like Google and Salesforce.

During this time, Fengru picked up two things; her passion for cheese-making 🧀 and the insatiable 10x mentality instilled from her tech surroundings. So when the time came for her to launch her own business, she knew she had to aim for something big.

Dairy 2.0: will it be plants or microbes that put cows out of a job? 🐄

For many years, soya was the undisputed champion of the lactose intolerant and alt-milk junkies. Then almond, rice and coconut arrived on the scene and alternatives broke into, then dominated, mainstream supermarket aisles. But today, dairy 2.0 has risen to new heights.

As well as the established giants – like Alpro, Blue Diamond Growers and Oatly – global food brands like Danone have joined the party. A diverse start-up scene has seen ambitious entrepreneurs milking everything in sight and cooking up all sorts of product innovations – from hemp and pea milk to chickpea ice cream and cheese made of cauliflower.

Then there are those who want to skip agriculture altogether. Precision fermentation advocates claim that this new microbe-driven production technique will make dairy farming obsolete by 2035.

So it seems that putting cows out of a job is big business. Fuelled by growing consumer demand and investors turning up the heat on carbon reduction commitments, the global dairy alternatives market is set to grow to $41 billion by 2025.

Thinking of ditching dairy? This week, we explore how the dairy alternatives market is evolving in 2020 and take a look at how innovative food businesses can milk this growing trend.

New in Funding:

In other news:


In This Week In Food, imagine turning down $2.6B - Postmates did. I chat with Fengru Lin, co-founder and CEO of Turtle Tree Labs about their cell-based milk tech as they just close off a fresh round of seed funding. 
What are the food trends that will be accelerated post-COVID? I gave my predictions on a LinkedIn post and heard back from experts and enthusiasts across the board with popular responses including algae and fermentation to way-out-there ideas like this 🤷 

Also, has Coca Cola's product innovation team completely lost it with this range of coffee-cola products? You let me know ☕️

Tip: If you'd like to get your product featured on FoodHack Discovery and in front of our readers (it's free) Submit your product here and we'll include it into next week's newsletter if selected.

Tonights Dinner Is Printed 🥩

Source: France24

This week, Redefine Meat announced the launch of their trademark Alt-Steak, a plant-based 3D printed steak, with consumer testing to kick off in high-end restaurants this year.

How it works: Redefine Meat's plant-based steaks are printed from three different ingredient packs which the company calls ‘Alt-Fat’, ‘Alt-Muscle’ and ‘Alt-Blood.’ Here's a video with a scientist.

CEO Eshchar Ben-Shitrit said “By using separate formulations for muscle, fat and blood, we can focus on each individual aspect of creating the perfect Alt-Steak product,”  

Think that's impressive? The company also announced their high-production industrial-level 3D printing capabilities allowing them to print up to 50 steaks an hour 🖨 that put my office printer to shame.

The company will roll out its 3D printed steaks to select restaurants in Europe this fall for market tests as it prepares for a broader rollout of its industrial 3D meat printers to meat distributors in 2021.

As part of the announcement, the company also partnered with global flavor conglomerate Givaudan, who worked closely with the company in mapping the flavor components of the company’s Alt-Steak formulation.

If you haven't already, check out our podcast episode with Eschar where he shares with us his early life before founding Redefine Meat - it's one of our most popular episodes 🔥


If we can't beat it - eat it 🥄

Pre-corona reusable bags were becoming the norm, coffee cup's the cool thing to do, and re-fill stations set to be the next big thing.

But as the pandemic struck, single-use plastic bags, containers and utensils have been on the rise due to health concerns. The problem has been especially apparent in the restaurant industry due to its increased reliance on food delivery services.

Whilst takeout and delivery isn't likely to go away anytime soon, we take a quick look at companies out there working on solutions that can convert food byproducts into reusable packaging:

  • Ecoinno, makes compostable packaging from leftover bamboo and sugarcane pulp, recently raised $6m in funding.
  • Varden recently received $2.2m in funding from Horizons Ventures. Varden converts sugarcane byproducts to packaging and aims to replace the plastic coffee pod.
  • Pulpworks uses byproducts from sugarcane, bamboo, and rice to create sustainable packaging for all types of goods, from electronics to food to personal care and medical devices.
  • NOM makes flavored edible straws out of basic ingredients including as rice flour, wheat flour, refined oil, salt, sugar
  • Candy Cutlery uses sugar cane to make spoons and cups meant for desserts (and that can be eaten afterwards).
  • Ecoshell uses sugar cane and cornstarch-based inputs to make cutlery, bags, and containers.
  • Loliware uses seaweed for what it claims is the "first certified edible bioplastic" (e.g., edible straws).
  • Notpla creates seaweed and plant-based packaging that "disappears" in the environment.
  • Do Eat makes potato waste-based containers.


Whilst many of these companies still have a long way to go before commercializing their products and making them price-competitive to plastic, it's positive to see both the number of companies in this space rising and the amount of investment entering into this category growing.

The Secret Sauce  From A Career In Tech To Making Cell-Based Milk: Fengru Lin, co-founder & CEO, Turtle Tree Labs

Imagine putting in half a million dollars of your own money into your startup.  

That’s exactly what co-founders, Fengru Lin, Max Rye and Rabail Toor did when they knew they had identified a novel approach to address the unsustainable dairy industry, a $716B global market.

Turtle Tree Labs are the first company in the world producing real, whole milk from cell cultivation — which opens the door for safer, healthier and customized dairy products that can be produced with far fewer natural resources and without the need for animals.

But Fengru’s journey didn’t start deep in the labs tinkering with cell-based technologies, instead, she was working in the offices of tech giants like Google and Salesforce.

During this time, Fengru picked up two things; her passion for cheese-making 🧀 and the insatiable 10x mentality instilled from her tech surroundings. So when the time came for her to launch her own business, she knew she had to aim for something big.

Dairy 2.0: will it be plants or microbes that put cows out of a job? 🐄

For many years, soya was the undisputed champion of the lactose intolerant and alt-milk junkies. Then almond, rice and coconut arrived on the scene and alternatives broke into, then dominated, mainstream supermarket aisles. But today, dairy 2.0 has risen to new heights.

As well as the established giants – like Alpro, Blue Diamond Growers and Oatly – global food brands like Danone have joined the party. A diverse start-up scene has seen ambitious entrepreneurs milking everything in sight and cooking up all sorts of product innovations – from hemp and pea milk to chickpea ice cream and cheese made of cauliflower.

Then there are those who want to skip agriculture altogether. Precision fermentation advocates claim that this new microbe-driven production technique will make dairy farming obsolete by 2035.

So it seems that putting cows out of a job is big business. Fuelled by growing consumer demand and investors turning up the heat on carbon reduction commitments, the global dairy alternatives market is set to grow to $41 billion by 2025.

Thinking of ditching dairy? This week, we explore how the dairy alternatives market is evolving in 2020 and take a look at how innovative food businesses can milk this growing trend.

New in Funding:

In other news: