Top 3 Startups of the Week on FoodHack | December W3

Top 3 Startups of the Week on FoodHack | December W3

By
Nicola Spalding
December 18, 2020

We rolled into our last week of the year for our Discovery startups with nine on-trend ideas from innovative companies all over the world. You’ve been voting all week for everything from oat milk puddings to edible spoons, and here is your last top three of 2020. We can’t wait for 2021!

1. Moonshot Snacks | San Francisco, USA

Source: Moonshot Snacks

We talked a little bit in Monday’s email about some of the things companies are doing and consumers can do to reduce our carbon footprint and try and reverse the impact of the climate crisis on the planet. Over in San Francisco, Moonshot Snacks is doing its very best to create climate-friendly snacks through a rigorous program of sustainable sourcing, including using stone-milled Edison wheat from regenerative local farms. Plus, it’s building an online platform called Planet FWD which allows other food companies to access resources which may help them become more sustainable in their approach.

2Plantruption | Dublin, Irland

Source: Plantruption

The world’s fish stocks are in danger through years of overfishing and the fact that over a third of the seafood harvest is wasted each year. Irish startup Plantruption has come up with a sustainable solution for consumers who still want that delicious taste of fish, but without the guilt about the state of the oceans. It’s created burgers made from hand-harvested Irish seaweed, micro algae and tempeh, which are super nutritious and packed with protein. Seaweed is actually carbon negative because it absorbs dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon dioxide directly from the sea. Plus, the burger packaging is fully compostable and dissolves in the ocean in 12-14 weeks, so they really have thought of everything to limit their products’ impact on the planet.

3. Actual Veggies | New York, USA

Source: Actual Veggies

We all know that the plant-based space is on fire. The global plant-based burger market is set to grow by over $650M in the period 2020-24, but the majority of veggie burgers are a bit, well, beige, or made with long lists of chemicals and additives to mimic meat. Not so with New York’s Actual Veggies’ veggie burgers, which are chef-crafted with fresh vegetables so are naturally colourful. These burgers celebrate the concept of ‘eating the rainbow’, as they’re packed with natural nutrients, contain no nasties, and claim to have 50% less salt than plant-based meat burgers. Clean labels, just plants, and they look and taste like works of art.

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We rolled into our last week of the year for our Discovery startups with nine on-trend ideas from innovative companies all over the world. You’ve been voting all week for everything from oat milk puddings to edible spoons, and here is your last top three of 2020. We can’t wait for 2021!

1. Moonshot Snacks | San Francisco, USA

Source: Moonshot Snacks

We talked a little bit in Monday’s email about some of the things companies are doing and consumers can do to reduce our carbon footprint and try and reverse the impact of the climate crisis on the planet. Over in San Francisco, Moonshot Snacks is doing its very best to create climate-friendly snacks through a rigorous program of sustainable sourcing, including using stone-milled Edison wheat from regenerative local farms. Plus, it’s building an online platform called Planet FWD which allows other food companies to access resources which may help them become more sustainable in their approach.

2Plantruption | Dublin, Irland

Source: Plantruption

The world’s fish stocks are in danger through years of overfishing and the fact that over a third of the seafood harvest is wasted each year. Irish startup Plantruption has come up with a sustainable solution for consumers who still want that delicious taste of fish, but without the guilt about the state of the oceans. It’s created burgers made from hand-harvested Irish seaweed, micro algae and tempeh, which are super nutritious and packed with protein. Seaweed is actually carbon negative because it absorbs dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon dioxide directly from the sea. Plus, the burger packaging is fully compostable and dissolves in the ocean in 12-14 weeks, so they really have thought of everything to limit their products’ impact on the planet.

3. Actual Veggies | New York, USA

Source: Actual Veggies

We all know that the plant-based space is on fire. The global plant-based burger market is set to grow by over $650M in the period 2020-24, but the majority of veggie burgers are a bit, well, beige, or made with long lists of chemicals and additives to mimic meat. Not so with New York’s Actual Veggies’ veggie burgers, which are chef-crafted with fresh vegetables so are naturally colourful. These burgers celebrate the concept of ‘eating the rainbow’, as they’re packed with natural nutrients, contain no nasties, and claim to have 50% less salt than plant-based meat burgers. Clean labels, just plants, and they look and taste like works of art.

Become a FoodHack+ member to get unlimited access

  • Access premium publications
  • Get listed on our directory
  • Join a Global Community

We rolled into our last week of the year for our Discovery startups with nine on-trend ideas from innovative companies all over the world. You’ve been voting all week for everything from oat milk puddings to edible spoons, and here is your last top three of 2020. We can’t wait for 2021!

1. Moonshot Snacks | San Francisco, USA

Source: Moonshot Snacks

We talked a little bit in Monday’s email about some of the things companies are doing and consumers can do to reduce our carbon footprint and try and reverse the impact of the climate crisis on the planet. Over in San Francisco, Moonshot Snacks is doing its very best to create climate-friendly snacks through a rigorous program of sustainable sourcing, including using stone-milled Edison wheat from regenerative local farms. Plus, it’s building an online platform called Planet FWD which allows other food companies to access resources which may help them become more sustainable in their approach.

2Plantruption | Dublin, Irland

Source: Plantruption

The world’s fish stocks are in danger through years of overfishing and the fact that over a third of the seafood harvest is wasted each year. Irish startup Plantruption has come up with a sustainable solution for consumers who still want that delicious taste of fish, but without the guilt about the state of the oceans. It’s created burgers made from hand-harvested Irish seaweed, micro algae and tempeh, which are super nutritious and packed with protein. Seaweed is actually carbon negative because it absorbs dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon dioxide directly from the sea. Plus, the burger packaging is fully compostable and dissolves in the ocean in 12-14 weeks, so they really have thought of everything to limit their products’ impact on the planet.

3. Actual Veggies | New York, USA

Source: Actual Veggies

We all know that the plant-based space is on fire. The global plant-based burger market is set to grow by over $650M in the period 2020-24, but the majority of veggie burgers are a bit, well, beige, or made with long lists of chemicals and additives to mimic meat. Not so with New York’s Actual Veggies’ veggie burgers, which are chef-crafted with fresh vegetables so are naturally colourful. These burgers celebrate the concept of ‘eating the rainbow’, as they’re packed with natural nutrients, contain no nasties, and claim to have 50% less salt than plant-based meat burgers. Clean labels, just plants, and they look and taste like works of art.

We rolled into our last week of the year for our Discovery startups with nine on-trend ideas from innovative companies all over the world. You’ve been voting all week for everything from oat milk puddings to edible spoons, and here is your last top three of 2020. We can’t wait for 2021!

1. Moonshot Snacks | San Francisco, USA

Source: Moonshot Snacks

We talked a little bit in Monday’s email about some of the things companies are doing and consumers can do to reduce our carbon footprint and try and reverse the impact of the climate crisis on the planet. Over in San Francisco, Moonshot Snacks is doing its very best to create climate-friendly snacks through a rigorous program of sustainable sourcing, including using stone-milled Edison wheat from regenerative local farms. Plus, it’s building an online platform called Planet FWD which allows other food companies to access resources which may help them become more sustainable in their approach.

2Plantruption | Dublin, Irland

Source: Plantruption

The world’s fish stocks are in danger through years of overfishing and the fact that over a third of the seafood harvest is wasted each year. Irish startup Plantruption has come up with a sustainable solution for consumers who still want that delicious taste of fish, but without the guilt about the state of the oceans. It’s created burgers made from hand-harvested Irish seaweed, micro algae and tempeh, which are super nutritious and packed with protein. Seaweed is actually carbon negative because it absorbs dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon dioxide directly from the sea. Plus, the burger packaging is fully compostable and dissolves in the ocean in 12-14 weeks, so they really have thought of everything to limit their products’ impact on the planet.

3. Actual Veggies | New York, USA

Source: Actual Veggies

We all know that the plant-based space is on fire. The global plant-based burger market is set to grow by over $650M in the period 2020-24, but the majority of veggie burgers are a bit, well, beige, or made with long lists of chemicals and additives to mimic meat. Not so with New York’s Actual Veggies’ veggie burgers, which are chef-crafted with fresh vegetables so are naturally colourful. These burgers celebrate the concept of ‘eating the rainbow’, as they’re packed with natural nutrients, contain no nasties, and claim to have 50% less salt than plant-based meat burgers. Clean labels, just plants, and they look and taste like works of art.