Top 3 Startups of the Week on FoodHack | October W3

Top 3 Startups of the Week on FoodHack | October W3

By
Nicola Spalding
October 23, 2020

Here at FoodHack we find and showcase inspiring, futuristic products made by some of the most innovative startups from across the globe on our Discovery board. Every week sees nine new concepts, and you vote for your favourites to feature in our top three summary.

This week we had low-cal cocktails, CBD drinks and dairy-free cashew cheese sauces, but here are your winners: 

1. Turtle | Brussels, Belgium

The global organic cereals market is projected to reach $49.34Bn by the end of 2024, and Turtle, based in Belgium, is getting in on the action. Cereals may be a speedy breakfast choice but they are rich in vitamins and fibre, and Turtle’s versions are vegan, unprocessed and have no added sugars, plus there are some gluten free options to cater to all dietary needs. While health is a huge consumer trend, clean labelling and consumer awareness of environmental impact are on the rise, so Turtle’s organic production processes, much less damaging than traditional agricultural processes, are right on the money. 

2. Everipe | New-York, United-States

New-York based Everipe makes superfood smoothie kits. The US smoothie market is estimated at $5.5Bn in 2020, and is only set to grow, as smoothies are the perfect balance of nutrition and convenience. What faster way to get great nutrients than by blending and drinking them? The difference between Everipe’s offer and the rest of the market is that these are made with fruits and superfoods picked at their very best, then naturally freeze dried to lock in the goodness. This means they can be stored in the pantry, so gone are the punnets of slightly past-it fruit in your fridge, and they come in a variety of delicious pre-mixed flavours, so no more forcing down questionable concoctions and hoping for the best.

3. Rubies in the Rubble | London, United-Kingdom

A few weeks ago, we celebrated the International Day of Awareness of Food Loss and Waste, set up to raise awareness of the fact that, globally, around 14% of food produced is lost between harvest and retail, a topic very close to Rubies in the Rubble’s founder Jenny’s heart. She started by rescuing imperfect produce, which would otherwise have been wasted, from New Covent Garden market and turned it into delectable condiments, which also extended the produce’s shelf life. Eight years on, the brand is one of the pioneering voices in food sustainability, and its award-winning range is made with wonky fruits and vegetables sourced directly from farms.


Written by
Nicola Spalding

Nicola is a trends analyst and content writer based in West Yorkshire. She has ten years' experience in UK and international retail, including a stint as a trend and innovation specialist for Morrisons supermarkets. A born foodie who loves words, it made sense for her to start writing about all the exciting things happening in food.

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Here at FoodHack we find and showcase inspiring, futuristic products made by some of the most innovative startups from across the globe on our Discovery board. Every week sees nine new concepts, and you vote for your favourites to feature in our top three summary.

This week we had low-cal cocktails, CBD drinks and dairy-free cashew cheese sauces, but here are your winners: 

1. Turtle | Brussels, Belgium

The global organic cereals market is projected to reach $49.34Bn by the end of 2024, and Turtle, based in Belgium, is getting in on the action. Cereals may be a speedy breakfast choice but they are rich in vitamins and fibre, and Turtle’s versions are vegan, unprocessed and have no added sugars, plus there are some gluten free options to cater to all dietary needs. While health is a huge consumer trend, clean labelling and consumer awareness of environmental impact are on the rise, so Turtle’s organic production processes, much less damaging than traditional agricultural processes, are right on the money. 

2. Everipe | New-York, United-States

New-York based Everipe makes superfood smoothie kits. The US smoothie market is estimated at $5.5Bn in 2020, and is only set to grow, as smoothies are the perfect balance of nutrition and convenience. What faster way to get great nutrients than by blending and drinking them? The difference between Everipe’s offer and the rest of the market is that these are made with fruits and superfoods picked at their very best, then naturally freeze dried to lock in the goodness. This means they can be stored in the pantry, so gone are the punnets of slightly past-it fruit in your fridge, and they come in a variety of delicious pre-mixed flavours, so no more forcing down questionable concoctions and hoping for the best.

3. Rubies in the Rubble | London, United-Kingdom

A few weeks ago, we celebrated the International Day of Awareness of Food Loss and Waste, set up to raise awareness of the fact that, globally, around 14% of food produced is lost between harvest and retail, a topic very close to Rubies in the Rubble’s founder Jenny’s heart. She started by rescuing imperfect produce, which would otherwise have been wasted, from New Covent Garden market and turned it into delectable condiments, which also extended the produce’s shelf life. Eight years on, the brand is one of the pioneering voices in food sustainability, and its award-winning range is made with wonky fruits and vegetables sourced directly from farms.


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  • Get listed on our directory
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Here at FoodHack we find and showcase inspiring, futuristic products made by some of the most innovative startups from across the globe on our Discovery board. Every week sees nine new concepts, and you vote for your favourites to feature in our top three summary.

This week we had low-cal cocktails, CBD drinks and dairy-free cashew cheese sauces, but here are your winners: 

1. Turtle | Brussels, Belgium

The global organic cereals market is projected to reach $49.34Bn by the end of 2024, and Turtle, based in Belgium, is getting in on the action. Cereals may be a speedy breakfast choice but they are rich in vitamins and fibre, and Turtle’s versions are vegan, unprocessed and have no added sugars, plus there are some gluten free options to cater to all dietary needs. While health is a huge consumer trend, clean labelling and consumer awareness of environmental impact are on the rise, so Turtle’s organic production processes, much less damaging than traditional agricultural processes, are right on the money. 

2. Everipe | New-York, United-States

New-York based Everipe makes superfood smoothie kits. The US smoothie market is estimated at $5.5Bn in 2020, and is only set to grow, as smoothies are the perfect balance of nutrition and convenience. What faster way to get great nutrients than by blending and drinking them? The difference between Everipe’s offer and the rest of the market is that these are made with fruits and superfoods picked at their very best, then naturally freeze dried to lock in the goodness. This means they can be stored in the pantry, so gone are the punnets of slightly past-it fruit in your fridge, and they come in a variety of delicious pre-mixed flavours, so no more forcing down questionable concoctions and hoping for the best.

3. Rubies in the Rubble | London, United-Kingdom

A few weeks ago, we celebrated the International Day of Awareness of Food Loss and Waste, set up to raise awareness of the fact that, globally, around 14% of food produced is lost between harvest and retail, a topic very close to Rubies in the Rubble’s founder Jenny’s heart. She started by rescuing imperfect produce, which would otherwise have been wasted, from New Covent Garden market and turned it into delectable condiments, which also extended the produce’s shelf life. Eight years on, the brand is one of the pioneering voices in food sustainability, and its award-winning range is made with wonky fruits and vegetables sourced directly from farms.


Here at FoodHack we find and showcase inspiring, futuristic products made by some of the most innovative startups from across the globe on our Discovery board. Every week sees nine new concepts, and you vote for your favourites to feature in our top three summary.

This week we had low-cal cocktails, CBD drinks and dairy-free cashew cheese sauces, but here are your winners: 

1. Turtle | Brussels, Belgium

The global organic cereals market is projected to reach $49.34Bn by the end of 2024, and Turtle, based in Belgium, is getting in on the action. Cereals may be a speedy breakfast choice but they are rich in vitamins and fibre, and Turtle’s versions are vegan, unprocessed and have no added sugars, plus there are some gluten free options to cater to all dietary needs. While health is a huge consumer trend, clean labelling and consumer awareness of environmental impact are on the rise, so Turtle’s organic production processes, much less damaging than traditional agricultural processes, are right on the money. 

2. Everipe | New-York, United-States

New-York based Everipe makes superfood smoothie kits. The US smoothie market is estimated at $5.5Bn in 2020, and is only set to grow, as smoothies are the perfect balance of nutrition and convenience. What faster way to get great nutrients than by blending and drinking them? The difference between Everipe’s offer and the rest of the market is that these are made with fruits and superfoods picked at their very best, then naturally freeze dried to lock in the goodness. This means they can be stored in the pantry, so gone are the punnets of slightly past-it fruit in your fridge, and they come in a variety of delicious pre-mixed flavours, so no more forcing down questionable concoctions and hoping for the best.

3. Rubies in the Rubble | London, United-Kingdom

A few weeks ago, we celebrated the International Day of Awareness of Food Loss and Waste, set up to raise awareness of the fact that, globally, around 14% of food produced is lost between harvest and retail, a topic very close to Rubies in the Rubble’s founder Jenny’s heart. She started by rescuing imperfect produce, which would otherwise have been wasted, from New Covent Garden market and turned it into delectable condiments, which also extended the produce’s shelf life. Eight years on, the brand is one of the pioneering voices in food sustainability, and its award-winning range is made with wonky fruits and vegetables sourced directly from farms.