Plant-based fish is now a thing and consumers are getting hooked

Plant-based fish is now a thing and consumers are getting hooked

By
Laura Robinson
February 11, 2020

The saying goes that if you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime. But with 90% of the world’s fish stocks in the red, it seems we might need a more future-focussed solution.

Until recently, if you’d have cast for plant-based fish, you’d have probably reeled in an empty line. But bolstered by conscious consumers’ changing preferences and the hefty returns on companies like Beyond Meat, investors are now flocking around this category like seagulls around an abandoned bag of fish and chips.

In fact, Barclays estimates that the plant-based food industry will be worth $140 billion in the next 10 years, capturing around 10 percent of the $1.4 trillion global meat industry. Given that “seafood” products only make up around 1.2 percent of these sales so far, the market opportunity is clear.

2019 saw a growing number of start-ups battling to gain market share, as reports indicated that the big fish were about to wade in and take over the pond. So let’s take a look at what’s on the menu in 2020 - and how we can get your customers hooked on this trend.

Trend drivers: healthy, conscious consumers and convenient protein

Traditionally, consumers have seen seafood as a healthier, lighter alternative to meat. But from mercury to microplastic, the industry has also faced its fair share of health crises over the last few years. Plant-based products are perfectly positioned to appeal to anxious consumers looking for “better-for-you”, allergen-free alternatives, which allow them to continue to enjoy all their fishy favourites.

Millennials and Generation Z in particular also care about the environmental and ethical impacts of the food they eat. They’re concerned about overfishing, its impact on local ecosystems and human rights violations in seafood supply chains. They want to make informed decisions, but they’re also confused by the myriad of labels that shout out at them from the fish aisle. So plant-based seafood feels like a safe shortcut.

And then there’s protein - the must-have micronutrient du jour. Many consumers want to adopt more plant-based diets, but don’t want to – or don’t feel able to – dive straight into dinners made of lentils and legumes. Plant-based seafood offers consumers in transition a convenient and familiar way to add variety to their new diet by treating them to a different taste and mouthfeel.

Products and distribution: from salmon and lobster to retail and restaurants  

Given that this product category is still in its infancy, the variety of plant-based seafood options is surprising. From salmon, shrimps and squid to lobster, sushi and caviar – products are just as varied as the ocean’s natural inhabitants. The same is true when it comes to primary ingredients, with research and development teams going beyond the usual suspects - soya, wheat, rice and legumes – and looking to carrots, fungi, aubergine and seaweed to create new taste and texture combinations.

In retail, the growing number of plant-based alternatives stocked shows to what extent these products are becoming mainstream. UK market leader Tesco, for example, launched an “affordable” plant-based battered fish to tempt the taste buds of flexitarians missing their chip shop fix. Swiss retailer Coop also added vegan fish - made by Dutch company Vivera - to their existing range of alternatives, recognising a rapid growth in consumer demand.  

Foodservice innovators are also playing an important role in responding to consumers’ changing needs. Vegan seafood is a boon to chefs who are looking to please foodie plant-lovers by offering them taste experiences that match their meat-munching fellow diners’ dishes. Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie, a family-run business that runs multiple restaurants in Switzerland, is eager to offer plant-based alternatives for the salmon, tuna and shrimp-based meals in their sushi concepts - Negishi Sushi Bar and Nooch Asian Kitchen. In a recent interview, Daniel Wiesner, COO at Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie stressed that this is not about replacing fish and seafood options – it’s about understanding what matters to conscious customers and providing them with a choice.

Case studies: Good Catch and Novish

US-based Good Catch was founded by two culinary ninja brothers – Chad and Derek Sarno. Passionate about plant-based eating since starting their blog Wicked Healthy, they spent eighteen months perfecting their seafood mouthfeel from a mix of six legumes. Their tuna and fish burgers have since gone on to win multiple awards. These accolades have certainly helped them reel in investment, closing a $32 million Series B funding round last month, led by American giant General Mills - the company behind Cheerios, Yoplait and Nature Valley.

Novish, the first European alternative fish company, is also gearing up to start distribution next month. Their products – including fish sticks, nuggets and burgers - were a huge success at the Horecava Expo in Amsterdam in January, with 95% of visitors giving them full marks for taste and texture. With big distribution plans, Novish is now looking for investment to bring new products – like sashimi-style salmon and tuna - to market over the next few months. Recognising that demand is driven by taste and trust, they’re also looking to partner with innovative restaurant chains to get their vegan seafood on the menu.

A war of words: labelling and shelf space

But it hasn’t all been plain sailing for young vegan seafood companies. A 2017 EU court ruling, stating that only animal products could bear the label “milk”, opened the debate about broader meat-related terminology used on plant-based products. Critics claim that labelling a product as “plant-based/vegan shrimp” is misleading consumers, while marketers rightly point out that “imitation shrimp” is hardly likely to get consumers salivating.

The placement of products on supermarket shelves adds another layer of complexity. Some retailers, like Tesco, are looking to create dedicated plant-based aisles to help vegetarian or vegan customers benefit from their full range of products and reduce the risk of confusion. Whereas many brands are eager to get their products placed next to the animal-based originals to tempt consumers to make the switch and help them recognise how they fit into their go-to meals.

But, without these issues mudding the waters, it’s clear that our oceans won’t be able to meet the growing demand for seafood in the future. Consumers are hooked on plant-based alternatives and vegan seafood – or whatever name appeases the powers that be – looks set to become part of the solution.

Business opportunities

Manufacturers

  • Consider how you could include plant-based seafood into ready-made products, like fish pies or Asian stir-fries.
  • Fish and seafood are often served up on special occasions. A focus on festive favourites might appeal to consumers struggling to find simple solutions for guests with different dietary requirements.
  • Think beyond the product itself. Conscious consumers are looking for evidence of sustainable production methods and packaging too – so make sure you communicate your USP.

Food Service

  • Check out which plant-based seafood options are available through local distribution channels and consider how these might be integrated into your menus.
  • Think about trialling new products through your specials menu or organising a themed event with a guest chef to assess which products go down best with your customers.

Retail

  • Experiment by developing a dedicated zone for plant-based products or place alternatives next to the animal-based originals to help consumers understand how they could replace their go-to shopping basket items.
  • Try out some in-store tastings to help consumers recognise how alternatives could be integrated into locally popular seafood dishes.  

Written by
Laura Robinson

From policy geek to digital consultant, Laura has always enjoyed bringing people together through words or tools to drive positive change. She is most proud of finally taking the leap into entrepreneurship by founding Pink Pear Agency - a network of passionate specialists who help food businesses grow innovative projects and share their stories with the world. Laura is currently interested in project development and management, digital tools, content strategy and copywriting.

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  • Access Member Directory
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The saying goes that if you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime. But with 90% of the world’s fish stocks in the red, it seems we might need a more future-focussed solution.

Until recently, if you’d have cast for plant-based fish, you’d have probably reeled in an empty line. But bolstered by conscious consumers’ changing preferences and the hefty returns on companies like Beyond Meat, investors are now flocking around this category like seagulls around an abandoned bag of fish and chips.

In fact, Barclays estimates that the plant-based food industry will be worth $140 billion in the next 10 years, capturing around 10 percent of the $1.4 trillion global meat industry. Given that “seafood” products only make up around 1.2 percent of these sales so far, the market opportunity is clear.

2019 saw a growing number of start-ups battling to gain market share, as reports indicated that the big fish were about to wade in and take over the pond. So let’s take a look at what’s on the menu in 2020 - and how we can get your customers hooked on this trend.

Trend drivers: healthy, conscious consumers and convenient protein

Traditionally, consumers have seen seafood as a healthier, lighter alternative to meat. But from mercury to microplastic, the industry has also faced its fair share of health crises over the last few years. Plant-based products are perfectly positioned to appeal to anxious consumers looking for “better-for-you”, allergen-free alternatives, which allow them to continue to enjoy all their fishy favourites.

Millennials and Generation Z in particular also care about the environmental and ethical impacts of the food they eat. They’re concerned about overfishing, its impact on local ecosystems and human rights violations in seafood supply chains. They want to make informed decisions, but they’re also confused by the myriad of labels that shout out at them from the fish aisle. So plant-based seafood feels like a safe shortcut.

And then there’s protein - the must-have micronutrient du jour. Many consumers want to adopt more plant-based diets, but don’t want to – or don’t feel able to – dive straight into dinners made of lentils and legumes. Plant-based seafood offers consumers in transition a convenient and familiar way to add variety to their new diet by treating them to a different taste and mouthfeel.

Products and distribution: from salmon and lobster to retail and restaurants  

Given that this product category is still in its infancy, the variety of plant-based seafood options is surprising. From salmon, shrimps and squid to lobster, sushi and caviar – products are just as varied as the ocean’s natural inhabitants. The same is true when it comes to primary ingredients, with research and development teams going beyond the usual suspects - soya, wheat, rice and legumes – and looking to carrots, fungi, aubergine and seaweed to create new taste and texture combinations.

In retail, the growing number of plant-based alternatives stocked shows to what extent these products are becoming mainstream. UK market leader Tesco, for example, launched an “affordable” plant-based battered fish to tempt the taste buds of flexitarians missing their chip shop fix. Swiss retailer Coop also added vegan fish - made by Dutch company Vivera - to their existing range of alternatives, recognising a rapid growth in consumer demand.  

Foodservice innovators are also playing an important role in responding to consumers’ changing needs. Vegan seafood is a boon to chefs who are looking to please foodie plant-lovers by offering them taste experiences that match their meat-munching fellow diners’ dishes. Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie, a family-run business that runs multiple restaurants in Switzerland, is eager to offer plant-based alternatives for the salmon, tuna and shrimp-based meals in their sushi concepts - Negishi Sushi Bar and Nooch Asian Kitchen. In a recent interview, Daniel Wiesner, COO at Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie stressed that this is not about replacing fish and seafood options – it’s about understanding what matters to conscious customers and providing them with a choice.

Case studies: Good Catch and Novish

US-based Good Catch was founded by two culinary ninja brothers – Chad and Derek Sarno. Passionate about plant-based eating since starting their blog Wicked Healthy, they spent eighteen months perfecting their seafood mouthfeel from a mix of six legumes. Their tuna and fish burgers have since gone on to win multiple awards. These accolades have certainly helped them reel in investment, closing a $32 million Series B funding round last month, led by American giant General Mills - the company behind Cheerios, Yoplait and Nature Valley.

Novish, the first European alternative fish company, is also gearing up to start distribution next month. Their products – including fish sticks, nuggets and burgers - were a huge success at the Horecava Expo in Amsterdam in January, with 95% of visitors giving them full marks for taste and texture. With big distribution plans, Novish is now looking for investment to bring new products – like sashimi-style salmon and tuna - to market over the next few months. Recognising that demand is driven by taste and trust, they’re also looking to partner with innovative restaurant chains to get their vegan seafood on the menu.

A war of words: labelling and shelf space

But it hasn’t all been plain sailing for young vegan seafood companies. A 2017 EU court ruling, stating that only animal products could bear the label “milk”, opened the debate about broader meat-related terminology used on plant-based products. Critics claim that labelling a product as “plant-based/vegan shrimp” is misleading consumers, while marketers rightly point out that “imitation shrimp” is hardly likely to get consumers salivating.

The placement of products on supermarket shelves adds another layer of complexity. Some retailers, like Tesco, are looking to create dedicated plant-based aisles to help vegetarian or vegan customers benefit from their full range of products and reduce the risk of confusion. Whereas many brands are eager to get their products placed next to the animal-based originals to tempt consumers to make the switch and help them recognise how they fit into their go-to meals.

But, without these issues mudding the waters, it’s clear that our oceans won’t be able to meet the growing demand for seafood in the future. Consumers are hooked on plant-based alternatives and vegan seafood – or whatever name appeases the powers that be – looks set to become part of the solution.

Business opportunities

Manufacturers

  • Consider how you could include plant-based seafood into ready-made products, like fish pies or Asian stir-fries.
  • Fish and seafood are often served up on special occasions. A focus on festive favourites might appeal to consumers struggling to find simple solutions for guests with different dietary requirements.
  • Think beyond the product itself. Conscious consumers are looking for evidence of sustainable production methods and packaging too – so make sure you communicate your USP.

Food Service

  • Check out which plant-based seafood options are available through local distribution channels and consider how these might be integrated into your menus.
  • Think about trialling new products through your specials menu or organising a themed event with a guest chef to assess which products go down best with your customers.

Retail

  • Experiment by developing a dedicated zone for plant-based products or place alternatives next to the animal-based originals to help consumers understand how they could replace their go-to shopping basket items.
  • Try out some in-store tastings to help consumers recognise how alternatives could be integrated into locally popular seafood dishes.  

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  • Access Member Directory
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The saying goes that if you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime. But with 90% of the world’s fish stocks in the red, it seems we might need a more future-focussed solution.

Until recently, if you’d have cast for plant-based fish, you’d have probably reeled in an empty line. But bolstered by conscious consumers’ changing preferences and the hefty returns on companies like Beyond Meat, investors are now flocking around this category like seagulls around an abandoned bag of fish and chips.

In fact, Barclays estimates that the plant-based food industry will be worth $140 billion in the next 10 years, capturing around 10 percent of the $1.4 trillion global meat industry. Given that “seafood” products only make up around 1.2 percent of these sales so far, the market opportunity is clear.

2019 saw a growing number of start-ups battling to gain market share, as reports indicated that the big fish were about to wade in and take over the pond. So let’s take a look at what’s on the menu in 2020 - and how we can get your customers hooked on this trend.

Trend drivers: healthy, conscious consumers and convenient protein

Traditionally, consumers have seen seafood as a healthier, lighter alternative to meat. But from mercury to microplastic, the industry has also faced its fair share of health crises over the last few years. Plant-based products are perfectly positioned to appeal to anxious consumers looking for “better-for-you”, allergen-free alternatives, which allow them to continue to enjoy all their fishy favourites.

Millennials and Generation Z in particular also care about the environmental and ethical impacts of the food they eat. They’re concerned about overfishing, its impact on local ecosystems and human rights violations in seafood supply chains. They want to make informed decisions, but they’re also confused by the myriad of labels that shout out at them from the fish aisle. So plant-based seafood feels like a safe shortcut.

And then there’s protein - the must-have micronutrient du jour. Many consumers want to adopt more plant-based diets, but don’t want to – or don’t feel able to – dive straight into dinners made of lentils and legumes. Plant-based seafood offers consumers in transition a convenient and familiar way to add variety to their new diet by treating them to a different taste and mouthfeel.

Products and distribution: from salmon and lobster to retail and restaurants  

Given that this product category is still in its infancy, the variety of plant-based seafood options is surprising. From salmon, shrimps and squid to lobster, sushi and caviar – products are just as varied as the ocean’s natural inhabitants. The same is true when it comes to primary ingredients, with research and development teams going beyond the usual suspects - soya, wheat, rice and legumes – and looking to carrots, fungi, aubergine and seaweed to create new taste and texture combinations.

In retail, the growing number of plant-based alternatives stocked shows to what extent these products are becoming mainstream. UK market leader Tesco, for example, launched an “affordable” plant-based battered fish to tempt the taste buds of flexitarians missing their chip shop fix. Swiss retailer Coop also added vegan fish - made by Dutch company Vivera - to their existing range of alternatives, recognising a rapid growth in consumer demand.  

Foodservice innovators are also playing an important role in responding to consumers’ changing needs. Vegan seafood is a boon to chefs who are looking to please foodie plant-lovers by offering them taste experiences that match their meat-munching fellow diners’ dishes. Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie, a family-run business that runs multiple restaurants in Switzerland, is eager to offer plant-based alternatives for the salmon, tuna and shrimp-based meals in their sushi concepts - Negishi Sushi Bar and Nooch Asian Kitchen. In a recent interview, Daniel Wiesner, COO at Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie stressed that this is not about replacing fish and seafood options – it’s about understanding what matters to conscious customers and providing them with a choice.

Case studies: Good Catch and Novish

US-based Good Catch was founded by two culinary ninja brothers – Chad and Derek Sarno. Passionate about plant-based eating since starting their blog Wicked Healthy, they spent eighteen months perfecting their seafood mouthfeel from a mix of six legumes. Their tuna and fish burgers have since gone on to win multiple awards. These accolades have certainly helped them reel in investment, closing a $32 million Series B funding round last month, led by American giant General Mills - the company behind Cheerios, Yoplait and Nature Valley.

Novish, the first European alternative fish company, is also gearing up to start distribution next month. Their products – including fish sticks, nuggets and burgers - were a huge success at the Horecava Expo in Amsterdam in January, with 95% of visitors giving them full marks for taste and texture. With big distribution plans, Novish is now looking for investment to bring new products – like sashimi-style salmon and tuna - to market over the next few months. Recognising that demand is driven by taste and trust, they’re also looking to partner with innovative restaurant chains to get their vegan seafood on the menu.

A war of words: labelling and shelf space

But it hasn’t all been plain sailing for young vegan seafood companies. A 2017 EU court ruling, stating that only animal products could bear the label “milk”, opened the debate about broader meat-related terminology used on plant-based products. Critics claim that labelling a product as “plant-based/vegan shrimp” is misleading consumers, while marketers rightly point out that “imitation shrimp” is hardly likely to get consumers salivating.

The placement of products on supermarket shelves adds another layer of complexity. Some retailers, like Tesco, are looking to create dedicated plant-based aisles to help vegetarian or vegan customers benefit from their full range of products and reduce the risk of confusion. Whereas many brands are eager to get their products placed next to the animal-based originals to tempt consumers to make the switch and help them recognise how they fit into their go-to meals.

But, without these issues mudding the waters, it’s clear that our oceans won’t be able to meet the growing demand for seafood in the future. Consumers are hooked on plant-based alternatives and vegan seafood – or whatever name appeases the powers that be – looks set to become part of the solution.

Business opportunities

Manufacturers

  • Consider how you could include plant-based seafood into ready-made products, like fish pies or Asian stir-fries.
  • Fish and seafood are often served up on special occasions. A focus on festive favourites might appeal to consumers struggling to find simple solutions for guests with different dietary requirements.
  • Think beyond the product itself. Conscious consumers are looking for evidence of sustainable production methods and packaging too – so make sure you communicate your USP.

Food Service

  • Check out which plant-based seafood options are available through local distribution channels and consider how these might be integrated into your menus.
  • Think about trialling new products through your specials menu or organising a themed event with a guest chef to assess which products go down best with your customers.

Retail

  • Experiment by developing a dedicated zone for plant-based products or place alternatives next to the animal-based originals to help consumers understand how they could replace their go-to shopping basket items.
  • Try out some in-store tastings to help consumers recognise how alternatives could be integrated into locally popular seafood dishes.  

The saying goes that if you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime. But with 90% of the world’s fish stocks in the red, it seems we might need a more future-focussed solution.

Until recently, if you’d have cast for plant-based fish, you’d have probably reeled in an empty line. But bolstered by conscious consumers’ changing preferences and the hefty returns on companies like Beyond Meat, investors are now flocking around this category like seagulls around an abandoned bag of fish and chips.

In fact, Barclays estimates that the plant-based food industry will be worth $140 billion in the next 10 years, capturing around 10 percent of the $1.4 trillion global meat industry. Given that “seafood” products only make up around 1.2 percent of these sales so far, the market opportunity is clear.

2019 saw a growing number of start-ups battling to gain market share, as reports indicated that the big fish were about to wade in and take over the pond. So let’s take a look at what’s on the menu in 2020 - and how we can get your customers hooked on this trend.

Trend drivers: healthy, conscious consumers and convenient protein

Traditionally, consumers have seen seafood as a healthier, lighter alternative to meat. But from mercury to microplastic, the industry has also faced its fair share of health crises over the last few years. Plant-based products are perfectly positioned to appeal to anxious consumers looking for “better-for-you”, allergen-free alternatives, which allow them to continue to enjoy all their fishy favourites.

Millennials and Generation Z in particular also care about the environmental and ethical impacts of the food they eat. They’re concerned about overfishing, its impact on local ecosystems and human rights violations in seafood supply chains. They want to make informed decisions, but they’re also confused by the myriad of labels that shout out at them from the fish aisle. So plant-based seafood feels like a safe shortcut.

And then there’s protein - the must-have micronutrient du jour. Many consumers want to adopt more plant-based diets, but don’t want to – or don’t feel able to – dive straight into dinners made of lentils and legumes. Plant-based seafood offers consumers in transition a convenient and familiar way to add variety to their new diet by treating them to a different taste and mouthfeel.

Products and distribution: from salmon and lobster to retail and restaurants  

Given that this product category is still in its infancy, the variety of plant-based seafood options is surprising. From salmon, shrimps and squid to lobster, sushi and caviar – products are just as varied as the ocean’s natural inhabitants. The same is true when it comes to primary ingredients, with research and development teams going beyond the usual suspects - soya, wheat, rice and legumes – and looking to carrots, fungi, aubergine and seaweed to create new taste and texture combinations.

In retail, the growing number of plant-based alternatives stocked shows to what extent these products are becoming mainstream. UK market leader Tesco, for example, launched an “affordable” plant-based battered fish to tempt the taste buds of flexitarians missing their chip shop fix. Swiss retailer Coop also added vegan fish - made by Dutch company Vivera - to their existing range of alternatives, recognising a rapid growth in consumer demand.  

Foodservice innovators are also playing an important role in responding to consumers’ changing needs. Vegan seafood is a boon to chefs who are looking to please foodie plant-lovers by offering them taste experiences that match their meat-munching fellow diners’ dishes. Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie, a family-run business that runs multiple restaurants in Switzerland, is eager to offer plant-based alternatives for the salmon, tuna and shrimp-based meals in their sushi concepts - Negishi Sushi Bar and Nooch Asian Kitchen. In a recent interview, Daniel Wiesner, COO at Fredy Wiesner Gastronomie stressed that this is not about replacing fish and seafood options – it’s about understanding what matters to conscious customers and providing them with a choice.

Case studies: Good Catch and Novish

US-based Good Catch was founded by two culinary ninja brothers – Chad and Derek Sarno. Passionate about plant-based eating since starting their blog Wicked Healthy, they spent eighteen months perfecting their seafood mouthfeel from a mix of six legumes. Their tuna and fish burgers have since gone on to win multiple awards. These accolades have certainly helped them reel in investment, closing a $32 million Series B funding round last month, led by American giant General Mills - the company behind Cheerios, Yoplait and Nature Valley.

Novish, the first European alternative fish company, is also gearing up to start distribution next month. Their products – including fish sticks, nuggets and burgers - were a huge success at the Horecava Expo in Amsterdam in January, with 95% of visitors giving them full marks for taste and texture. With big distribution plans, Novish is now looking for investment to bring new products – like sashimi-style salmon and tuna - to market over the next few months. Recognising that demand is driven by taste and trust, they’re also looking to partner with innovative restaurant chains to get their vegan seafood on the menu.

A war of words: labelling and shelf space

But it hasn’t all been plain sailing for young vegan seafood companies. A 2017 EU court ruling, stating that only animal products could bear the label “milk”, opened the debate about broader meat-related terminology used on plant-based products. Critics claim that labelling a product as “plant-based/vegan shrimp” is misleading consumers, while marketers rightly point out that “imitation shrimp” is hardly likely to get consumers salivating.

The placement of products on supermarket shelves adds another layer of complexity. Some retailers, like Tesco, are looking to create dedicated plant-based aisles to help vegetarian or vegan customers benefit from their full range of products and reduce the risk of confusion. Whereas many brands are eager to get their products placed next to the animal-based originals to tempt consumers to make the switch and help them recognise how they fit into their go-to meals.

But, without these issues mudding the waters, it’s clear that our oceans won’t be able to meet the growing demand for seafood in the future. Consumers are hooked on plant-based alternatives and vegan seafood – or whatever name appeases the powers that be – looks set to become part of the solution.

Business opportunities

Manufacturers

  • Consider how you could include plant-based seafood into ready-made products, like fish pies or Asian stir-fries.
  • Fish and seafood are often served up on special occasions. A focus on festive favourites might appeal to consumers struggling to find simple solutions for guests with different dietary requirements.
  • Think beyond the product itself. Conscious consumers are looking for evidence of sustainable production methods and packaging too – so make sure you communicate your USP.

Food Service

  • Check out which plant-based seafood options are available through local distribution channels and consider how these might be integrated into your menus.
  • Think about trialling new products through your specials menu or organising a themed event with a guest chef to assess which products go down best with your customers.

Retail

  • Experiment by developing a dedicated zone for plant-based products or place alternatives next to the animal-based originals to help consumers understand how they could replace their go-to shopping basket items.
  • Try out some in-store tastings to help consumers recognise how alternatives could be integrated into locally popular seafood dishes.